Search results for “National Martini Day

June 19th is National Martini Day

Posted on June 19, 2017

High-res version

Five Food Finds about the Martini:

  1. A classic martini is gin or vodka, a splash of dry vermouth (French-white) and an olive or a lemon twist garnish.
  2. Italian immigrant bartender Martini di Arma di Taggia in New York City is said to have invent the drink around World War I
  3. If a Martini is shaken it is said to be ‘bruised’ or watered down. Many say stirring the ice will help chill without adding water to the mixture.
  4. Many think the martini is derived from a British-made rifle called a Martini & Henry used by the English army 1870’s because of its ‘kick’.
  5. It is said that John D. Rockefeller ‘brought the Martini to Wall Street’ thus establishing the ‘3 martini lunch’

Today’s Food History

  • 1912 The United States government adopted an 8-hour work day. (I’m still waiting!)
  • 1931 The first commercial doors operated by a photoelectric cell were installed on the swinging doors between the kitchen and dining room of Wilcox’s Pier Restaurant in West Haven, Connecticut.
  • 1941 General Mills introduced ‘Cheerioats.’ The name was changed to ‘Cheerios’ in 1945.
  • 1978 Garfield, the lasagna eating cat was born. He was brought into this world by cartoonist Jim Davis.
  • 1987 Ben & Jerry Ice Cream introduced a new Ice Cream flavor, Cherry Garcia.
  • 1993 English author William Golding died. His first novel was ‘Lord of the Flies’ (1954).

June 19th is National Martini Day

Posted on June 19, 2016

High-res version

Five Food Finds about the Martini:

  1. A classic martini is gin or vodka, a splash of dry vermouth (French-white) and an olive or a lemon twist garnish.
  2. Italian immigrant bartender Martini di Arma di Taggia in New York City is said to have invent the drink around World War I
  3. If a Martini is shaken it is said to be ‘bruised’ or watered down. Many say stirring the ice will help chill without adding water to the mixture.
  4. Many think the martini is derived from a British-made rifle called a Martini & Henry used by the English army 1870’s because of its ‘kick’.
  5. It is said that John D. Rockefeller ‘brought the Martini to Wall Street’ thus establishing the ‘3 martini lunch’

Today’s Food History

  • 1912 The United States government adopted an 8-hour work day. (I’m still waiting!)
  • 1931 The first commercial doors operated by a photoelectric cell were installed on the swinging doors between the kitchen and dining room of Wilcox’s Pier Restaurant in West Haven, Connecticut.
  • 1941 General Mills introduced ‘Cherioats.’ The name was changed to ‘Cherrios’ in 1945.
  • 1978 Garfield, the lasagna eating cat was born. He was brought into this world by cartoonist Jim Davis.
  • 1987 Ben & Jerry Ice Cream introduced a new Ice Cream flavor, Cherry Garcia.
  • 1993 English author William Golding died. His first novel was ‘Lord of the Flies’ (1954).

June 19 is National Martini Day

Posted on June 19, 2015

MartiniFeatureBox.com

MartiniFeatureBox.com

Let’s celebrate the cocktail that helped define the 20th century!

A little Martini trivia:

  1. A classic martini is gin or vodka, a splash of dry vermouth (French-white) and an olive or a lemon twist garnish.
  2. Italian immigrant bartender Martini di Arma di Taggia in New York City is said to have invent the drink around World War I
  3. If a Martini is shaken it is said to be ‘bruised’ or watered down. Many say stirring the ice will help chill without adding water to the mixture.
  4. Many think the martini is derived from a British-made rifle called a Martini & Henry used by the English army 1870’s because of its ‘kick’.
  5. It is said that John D. Rockefeller ‘brought the Martini to Wall Street’ thus establishing the ‘3 martini lunch’

Today’s Food History

  • 1912 The United States government adopted an 8-hour work day. (I’m still waiting!)
  • 1931 The first commercial doors operated by a photoelectric cell were installed on the swinging doors between the kitchen and dining room of Wilcox’s Pier Restaurant in West Haven, Connecticut.
  • 1941 General Mills introduced ‘Cherioats.’ The name was changed to ‘Cherrios’ in 1945.
  • 1978 Garfield, the lasagna eating cat was born. He was brought into this world by cartoonist Jim Davis.
  • 1987 Ben & Jerry Ice Cream introduced a new Ice Cream flavor, Cherry Garcia.
  • 1993 English author William Golding died. His first novel was ‘Lord of the Flies’ (1954).

National Martini Day

Posted on June 19, 2013

National Martini Day

Five Food Finds about Martinis

  • The Martini, gin and vermouth, is probably the most popular and widely consumed cocktail. Its origin is in dispute, but it dates back to about 1862.
  • The Martini’s popularity has waxed and waned, and its recipe has changed considerably over the years.
  • Going from an original mixture that contained more Vermouth than Gin garnished with a lemon twist, to 2 to 1 gin and vermouth, to a 15 to 1 mixture, and finally straight chilled Gin.
  • There is also the Vodka Martini.
  • Standard Martini garnish is an olive, garnish it with a pearl onion and it is called a Gibson.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1912 The United States government adopted an 8-hour work day. (I’m still waiting!)

1931 The first commercial doors operated by a photoelectric cell were installed on the swinging doors between the kitchen and dining room of Wilcox’s Pier Restaurant in West Haven, Connecticut.

1941 General Mills introduced ‘Cherioats.’ The name was changed to ‘Cherrios’ in 1945.

1978 Garfield, the lasagna eating cat was born. He was brought into this world by cartoonist Jim Davis.

1987 Ben & Jerry Ice Cream introduced a new Ice Cream flavor, Cherry Garcia.

1993 English author William Golding died. His first novel was ‘Lord of the Flies’ (1954).

June 19 – National Martini Day

Posted on June 19, 2012

National Martini Day

Five Food Finds about Martinis

  • The Martini, gin and vermouth, is probably the most popular and widely consumed cocktail. Its origin is in dispute, but it dates back to about 1862.
  • The Martini’s popularity has waxed and waned, and its recipe has changed considerably over the years.
  • Going from an original mixture that contained more Vermouth than Gin garnished with a lemon twist, to 2 to 1 gin and vermouth, to a 15 to 1 mixture, and finally straight chilled Gin.
  • There is also the Vodka Martini.
  • Standard Martini garnish is an olive, garnish it with a pearl onion and it is called a Gibson.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1912 The United States government adopted an 8-hour work day. (I’m still waiting!)

1931 The first commercial doors operated by a photoelectric cell were installed on the swinging doors between the kitchen and dining room of Wilcox’s Pier Restaurant in West Haven, Connecticut.

1941 General Mills introduced ‘Cherioats.’ The name was changed to ‘Cherrios’ in 1945.

1978 Garfield, the lasagna eating cat was born. He was brought into this world by cartoonist Jim Davis.

1987 Ben & Jerry Ice Cream introduced a new Ice Cream flavor, Cherry Garcia.

1993 English author William Golding died. His first novel was ‘Lord of the Flies’ (1954).

November 9th is National Greek Yogurt Day / #NationalGreekYogurtDay

Posted on November 9, 2018

High-res version

Here are your five food facts about greek yogurt:

It’s actually Turkish.

giphy6

It happened on accident: primitive milk storage created yogurt.

nomad-north-africa

Yogurt contains high amounts of lactic acid which is good for your skin!

lactic_acid

It’s gaining in popularity: more than a third of the yogurt carried by grocery stores is greek yogurt.


Yogurt contains “good bacteria” which promotes healthy digestion and supports your immune system!


Today’s Food History

  • 1801 Gail Borden born. Inventor of process for making condensed milk, and founder of New York Condensed Milk Co. (later renamed Borden Co).
  • 1857 The first issue of the Atlantic Monthly was published. It contained the first installment of Oliver Wendell Holmes’ ‘The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table.’
  • 1891 George A. Hormel opened his packinghouse in Austin, Minnesota.
  • 1911 George Claude applied for a patent for an electric neon sign. It was issued on January 19, 1915.
  • 1938 Edward Murray East died. An American botanist and chemist he helped with the development of hybrid corn. Specifically, he concentrated on controlling the protein and fat content of possible hybrids.
  • 1948‘More Beer’ is recorded by the Ames Brothers.
  • 1953 Dylan Thomas, Welsh poet, died at the Chelsea Hotel in New York. He had consumed 18 straight martinis.
  • 1961 During lunchtime, Brian Epstein heard the Beatles for the first time at The Cavern in Liverpool.
  • 1963 The enigmatic ‘Louie Louie’ was released by the Kingsmen.
  • 1965 At 5:15 p.m. a 13 hour blackout of the northeastern U.S. and parts of Canada began when the electric grid failed.

Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4


October 1st is National Pumpkin Spice Day! / #NationalPumpkinSpiceDay #October1st

Posted on October 1, 2018

High-res version

Here are today’s 5 thing to know about Pumpkins:

  1. The largest pumpkin pie ever made was over five feet in diameter and weighed over 350 pounds. It used 80 pounds of cooked pumpkin, 36 pounds of sugar, 12 dozen eggs and took six hours to bake.
  2. In early colonial times, pumpkins were used as an ingredient for the crust of pies, not the filling.
  3. Pumpkins were once recommended for removing freckles and curing snake bites.
  4. The largest pumpkin ever grown weighed 1,140 pounds.
  5. The Connecticut field variety is the traditional American pumpkin.

Today’s Food History

  • 1795 Robert Bakewell died (born, May 23, 1725).  Bakewell was an agriculturalist who helped revolutionize cattle and sheep breeding in England. He obtained the best animals he could find and then worked with a closed herd, inbreeding only superior animals.
  • 1908 The Model T Ford was introduced at a price of $825. Due to efficient mass production, by 1925 the price of a 2 door Model T was only $260.
  • 1913 A monument to honor sea gulls was erected in Salt Lake City. The gulls had eaten the plague of grasshoppers that threatened the Mormon settlers crops in 1848.
  • 1924 James Earl (Jimmy) Carter was born. He was a peanut farmer, and 39th president of the U.S. (He also claimed to have been attacked by a rabbit while canoeing. He beat the rabbit off with a paddle).
  • 1943 Jerry Martini of the music group ‘Sly & The Family Stone’ was born.
  • 1968 Flesh eating Zombies are on the loose as George Romero’s horror film ‘Night of the Living Dead’ is released.
  • 1971 Disney World opened at Orlando, Florida.
  • 1972 Louis Leakey died. Anthropologist largely responsible for convincing scientists that Africa was the place to search for human origins, not Java or China. Together with his wife Mary, they made many significant fossil discoveries.
  • 1974 The first McDonald’s restaurant opened in London.
  • 1980 European Community countries banned the use of hormones in cattle feed.
  • 2006 Sometime during October 2006 the population of the U.S. will reach 300 million.
  • 2006 The New Orleans  landmark restaurant, Commander’s Palace, reopened. It had been closed since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in August, 2005.
  • 2009 McDonald’s closed its 3 locations in Iceland this month due to the ‘complex operational environment.’
  • 2011 World population is expected to hit 7 billion this month.

 


Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4

 

Cheers! June 19th is National 🍸🍸Martini Day🍸🍸

Posted on June 19, 2018

High-res version

Happy National Martini Day!🍸

Five Food Finds about the Martini:

  1. A classic martini is gin or vodka, a splash of dry vermouth (French-white) and an olive or a lemon twist garnish.
  2. Italian immigrant bartender Martini di Arma di Taggia in New York City is said to have invent the drink around World War I
  3. If a Martini is shaken it is said to be ‘bruised’ or watered down. Many say stirring the ice will help chill without adding water to the mixture.
  4. Many think the martini is derived from a British-made rifle called a Martini & Henry used by the English army 1870’s because of its ‘kick’.
  5. It is said that John D. Rockefeller ‘brought the Martini to Wall Street’ thus establishing the ‘3 martini lunch’

Today’s Food History

  • 1912 The United States government adopted an 8-hour work day. (I’m still waiting!)
  • 1931 The first commercial doors operated by a photoelectric cell were installed on the swinging doors between the kitchen and dining room of Wilcox’s Pier Restaurant in West Haven, Connecticut.
  • 1941 General Mills introduced ‘Cheerioats.’ The name was changed to ‘Cheerios’ in 1945.
  • 1978 Garfield, the lasagna eating cat was born. He was brought into this world by cartoonist Jim Davis.
  • 1987 Ben & Jerry Ice Cream introduced a new Ice Cream flavor, Cherry Garcia.
  • 1993 English author William Golding died. His first novel was ‘Lord of the Flies’ (1954).

November 9th is National Greek Yogurt Day!

Posted on November 9, 2017

High-res version

Here are your five food facts about greek yogurt:

It’s actually Turkish.

giphy6

It happened on accident: primitive milk storage created yogurt.

nomad-north-africa

Yogurt contains high amounts of lactic acid which is good for your skin!

lactic_acid

It’s gaining in popularity: more than a third of the yogurt carried by grocery stores is greek yogurt.


Yogurt contains “good bacteria” which promotes healthy digestion and supports your immune system!


Today’s Food History

  • 1801 Gail Borden born. Inventor of process for making condensed milk, and founder of New York Condensed Milk Co. (later renamed Borden Co).
  • 1857 The first issue of the Atlantic Monthly was published. It contained the first installment of Oliver Wendell Holmes’ ‘The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table.’
  • 1891 George A. Hormel opened his packinghouse in Austin, Minnesota.
  • 1911 George Claude applied for a patent for an electric neon sign. It was issued on January 19, 1915.
  • 1938 Edward Murray East died. An American botanist and chemist he helped with the development of hybrid corn. Specifically, he concentrated on controlling the protein and fat content of possible hybrids.
  • 1948‘More Beer’ is recorded by the Ames Brothers.
  • 1953 Dylan Thomas, Welsh poet, died at the Chelsea Hotel in New York. He had consumed 18 straight martinis.
  • 1961 During lunchtime, Brian Epstein heard the Beatles for the first time at The Cavern in Liverpool.
  • 1963 The enigmatic ‘Louie Louie’ was released by the Kingsmen.
  • 1965 At 5:15 p.m. a 13 hour blackout of the northeastern U.S. and parts of Canada began when the electric grid failed.

Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4


 

October 1st is National Pumpkin Spice Day!

Posted on October 1, 2017

High-res version

Here are today’s 5 thing to know about Pumpkins:

  1. The largest pumpkin pie ever made was over five feet in diameter and weighed over 350 pounds. It used 80 pounds of cooked pumpkin, 36 pounds of sugar, 12 dozen eggs and took six hours to bake.
  2. In early colonial times, pumpkins were used as an ingredient for the crust of pies, not the filling.
  3. Pumpkins were once recommended for removing freckles and curing snake bites.
  4. The largest pumpkin ever grown weighed 1,140 pounds.
  5. The Connecticut field variety is the traditional American pumpkin.

Today’s Food History

  • 1795 Robert Bakewell died (born, May 23, 1725).  Bakewell was an agriculturalist who helped revolutionize cattle and sheep breeding in England. He obtained the best animals he could find and then worked with a closed herd, inbreeding only superior animals.
  • 1908 The Model T Ford was introduced at a price of $825. Due to efficient mass production, by 1925 the price of a 2 door Model T was only $260.
  • 1913 A monument to honor sea gulls was erected in Salt Lake City. The gulls had eaten the plague of grasshoppers that threatened the Mormon settlers crops in 1848.
  • 1924 James Earl (Jimmy) Carter was born. He was a peanut farmer, and 39th president of the U.S. (He also claimed to have been attacked by a rabbit while canoeing. He beat the rabbit off with a paddle).
  • 1943 Jerry Martini of the music group ‘Sly & The Family Stone’ was born.
  • 1968 Flesh eating Zombies are on the loose as George Romero’s horror film ‘Night of the Living Dead’ is released.
  • 1971 Disney World opened at Orlando, Florida.
  • 1972 Louis Leakey died. Anthropologist largely responsible for convincing scientists that Africa was the place to search for human origins, not Java or China. Together with his wife Mary, they made many significant fossil discoveries.
  • 1974 The first McDonald’s restaurant opened in London.
  • 1980 European Community countries banned the use of hormones in cattle feed.
  • 2006 Sometime during October 2006 the population of the U.S. will reach 300 million.
  • 2006 The New Orleans  landmark restaurant, Commander’s Palace, reopened. It had been closed since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in August, 2005.
  • 2009 McDonald’s closed its 3 locations in Iceland this month due to the ‘complex operational environment.’
  • 2011 World population is expected to hit 7 billion this month.

 


Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4

 

November 9th is National Greek Yogurt Day!

Posted on November 9, 2016

High-res version

Here are your five food facts about greek yogurt:

 

It’s actually Turkish.

giphy6

It happened on accident: primitive milk storage created yogurt.

nomad-north-africa

Yogurt contains high amounts of lactic acid which is good for your skin!

lactic_acid

It’s gaining in popularity: more than a third of the yogurt carried by grocery stores is greek yogurt.


Yogurt contains “good bacteria” which promotes healthy digestion and supports your immune system!


Today’s Food History

  • 1801 Gail Borden born. Inventor of process for making condensed milk, and founder of New York Condensed Milk Co. (later renamed Borden Co).
  • 1857 The first issue of the Atlantic Monthly was published. It contained the first installment of Oliver Wendell Holmes’ ‘The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table.’
  • 1891 George A. Hormel opened his packinghouse in Austin, Minnesota.
  • 1911 George Claude applied for a patent for an electric neon sign. It was issued on January 19, 1915.
  • 1938 Edward Murray East died. An American botanist and chemist he helped with the development of hybrid corn. Specifically, he concentrated on controlling the protein and fat content of possible hybrids.
  • 1948‘More Beer’ is recorded by the Ames Brothers.
  • 1953 Dylan Thomas, Welsh poet, died at the Chelsea Hotel in New York. He had consumed 18 straight martinis.
  • 1961 During lunchtime, Brian Epstein heard the Beatles for the first time at The Cavern in Liverpool.
  • 1963 The enigmatic ‘Louie Louie’ was released by the Kingsmen.
  • 1965 At 5:15 p.m. a 13 hour blackout of the northeastern U.S. and parts of Canada began when the electric grid failed.

 


Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4


October 26th is National Pumpkin Day!

Posted on October 26, 2016

High-res version

Here are today’s five thing to know about Pumpkins:

giphy1

The largest pumpkin pie ever made was over five feet in diameter and weighed over 350 pounds. It used 80 pounds of cooked pumpkin, 36 pounds of sugar, 12 dozen eggs and took six hours to bake.

giphy2

In early colonial times, pumpkins were used as an ingredient for the crust of pies, not the filling.

giphy3

Pumpkins were once recommended for removing freckles and curing snake bites.

giphy4

The largest pumpkin ever grown weighed 1,140 pounds.

giphy-downsized-large

The Connecticut field variety is the traditional American pumpkin.

giphy5

 

 

Celebrate #NationalPumpkinDay with a White Chocolate Chili Pumpkin Martini recipe! Brought to you by our friends at SpicedUP: 

  1. Pour vanilla flavored vodka, Irish cream liqueur, and pumpkin flavored liqueur into a cocktail shaker over ice.
  2. Cover, and shake until the outside of the shaker has frosted.
  3. Strain into a chilled martini glass, and garnish with a sprinkle of ground cinnamon and ground nutmeg to serve.
  4. Rim a martini glass with our Chocolate Chili Sugar to kick up the heat.
WCCS Martini.jpg

October 1st is National Pumpkin Spice Day!

Posted on October 1, 2016

High-res version

Here are today’s 5 thing to know about Pumpkins:

  1. The largest pumpkin pie ever made was over five feet in diameter and weighed over 350 pounds. It used 80 pounds of cooked pumpkin, 36 pounds of sugar, 12 dozen eggs and took six hours to bake.
  2. In early colonial times, pumpkins were used as an ingredient for the crust of pies, not the filling.
  3. Pumpkins were once recommended for removing freckles and curing snake bites.
  4. The largest pumpkin ever grown weighed 1,140 pounds.
  5. The Connecticut field variety is the traditional American pumpkin.

Today’s Food History

  • 1795 Robert Bakewell died (born, May 23, 1725).  Bakewell was an agriculturalist who helped revolutionize cattle and sheep breeding in England. He obtained the best animals he could find and then worked with a closed herd, inbreeding only superior animals.
  • 1908 The Model T Ford was introduced at a price of $825. Due to efficient mass production, by 1925 the price of a 2 door Model T was only $260.
  • 1913 A monument to honor sea gulls was erected in Salt Lake City. The gulls had eaten the plague of grasshoppers that threatened the Mormon settlers crops in 1848.
  • 1924 James Earl (Jimmy) Carter was born. He was a peanut farmer, and 39th president of the U.S. (He also claimed to have been attacked by a rabbit while canoeing. He beat the rabbit off with a paddle).
  • 1943 Jerry Martini of the music group ‘Sly & The Family Stone’ was born.
  • 1968 Flesh eating Zombies are on the loose as George Romero’s horror film ‘Night of the Living Dead’ is released.
  • 1971 Disney World opened at Orlando, Florida.
  • 1972 Louis Leakey died. Anthropologist largely responsible for convincing scientists that Africa was the place to search for human origins, not Java or China. Together with his wife Mary, they made many significant fossil discoveries.
  • 1974 The first McDonald’s restaurant opened in London.
  • 1980 European Community countries banned the use of hormones in cattle feed.
  • 2006 Sometime during October 2006 the population of the U.S. will reach 300 million.
  • 2006 The New Orleans  landmark restaurant, Commander’s Palace, reopened. It had been closed since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in August, 2005.
  • 2009 McDonald’s closed its 3 locations in Iceland this month due to the ‘complex operational environment.’
  • 2011 World population is expected to hit 7 billion this month.

 


Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4

 

November 9th is National Greek Yogurt Day

Posted on November 9, 2015

High-res version

Happy National Greek Yogurt Day


Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

Today’s Food History

  • 1801 Gail Borden born. Inventor of process for making condensed milk, and founder of New York Condensed Milk Co. (later renamed Borden Co).
  • 1857 The first issue of the Atlantic Monthly was published. It contained the first installment of Oliver Wendell Holmes’ ‘The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table.’
  • 1891 George A. Hormel opened his packinghouse in Austin, Minnesota.
  • 1911 George Claude applied for a patent for an electric neon sign. It was issued on January 19, 1915.
  • 1938 Edward Murray East died. An American botanist and chemist he helped with the development of hybrid corn. Specifically, he concentrated on controlling the protein and fat content of possible hybrids.
  • 1948‘More Beer’ is recorded by the Ames Brothers.
  • 1953 Dylan Thomas, Welsh poet, died at the Chelsea Hotel in New York. He had consumed 18 straight martinis.
  • 1961 During lunchtime, Brian Epstein heard the Beatles for the first time at The Cavern in Liverpool.
  • 1963 The enigmatic ‘Louie Louie’ was released by the Kingsmen.
  • 1965 At 5:15 p.m. a 13 hour blackout of the northeastern U.S. and parts of Canada began when the electric grid failed.

Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4


 

October 2 is National World Farm Animals Day

Posted on October 2, 2015


Here are today’s five things to know about farm animals :

  1. Pig insulin is used to control diabetes.
  2. Goats and sheep don’t have teeth on their upper jaw. They have a hard palate that helps them grind their food.
  3. The chicken is the closest living relative to the T-Rex.
  4. Geese are faithful, mate for life, and mourn when their partner dies.
  5. Cows have a memory of about three years.

Today’s Food History

  • 1795 Robert Bakewell died. Bakewell was an agriculturalist who helped revolutionize cattle and sheep breeding in England. He obtained the best animals he could find and then worked with a closed herd, inbreeding only superior animals.
  • 1908 The Model T Ford was introduced at a price of $825. Due to efficient mass production, by 1925 the price of a 2 door Model T was only $260.
  • 1913 A monument to honor sea gulls was erected in Salt Lake City. The gulls had eaten the plague of grasshoppers that threatened the Mormon settlers crops in 1848.
  • 1916 The first Piggly-Wiggly supermarket opened.
  • 1924 James Earl (Jimmy) Carter was born. He was a peanut farmer, and 39th president of the U.S. (He also claimed to have been attacked by a rabbit while canoeing. He beat the rabbit off with a paddle).
  • 1943 Jerry Martini of the music group ‘Sly & The Family Stone’ was born.
  • 1971 Disney World opened at Orlando, Florida.
  • 1972 Louis Leakey died. Anthropologist largely responsible for convincing scientists that Africa was the place to search for human origins, not Java or China. Together with his wife Mary, they made many significant fossil discoveries.
  • 1974 The first McDonald’s restaurant opened in London.
  • 1980 European Community countries banned the use of hormones in cattle feed.
  • 2006 Sometime during October 2006 the population of the U.S. will reach 300 million.
  • 2006 The New Orleans  landmark restaurant, Commander’s Palace, reopened. It had been closed since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in August, 2005.
  • 2009 McDonald’s closed its 3 locations in Iceland this month due to the ‘complex operational environment.’

Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4

 

October 1 is National Pumpkin Spice Day

Posted on October 1, 2015

pumpkinspiceday

Here are today’s five thing to know about Pumpkins:

  1. The largest pumpkin pie ever made was over five feet in diameter and weighed over 350 pounds. It used 80 pounds of cooked pumpkin, 36 pounds of sugar, 12 dozen eggs and took six hours to bake.
  2. In early colonial times, pumpkins were used as an ingredient for the crust of pies, not the filling.
  3. Pumpkins were once recommended for removing freckles and curing snake bites.
  4. The largest pumpkin ever grown weighed 1,140 pounds.
  5. The Connecticut field variety is the traditional American pumpkin.

Today’s Food History

  • 1795 Robert Bakewell died (born, May 23, 1725).  Bakewell was an agriculturalist who helped revolutionize cattle and sheep breeding in England. He obtained the best animals he could find and then worked with a closed herd, inbreeding only superior animals.
  • 1908 The Model T Ford was introduced at a price of $825. Due to efficient mass production, by 1925 the price of a 2 door Model T was only $260.
  • 1913 A monument to honor sea gulls was erected in Salt Lake City. The gulls had eaten the plague of grasshoppers that threatened the Mormon settlers crops in 1848.
  • 1924 James Earl (Jimmy) Carter was born. He was a peanut farmer, and 39th president of the U.S. (He also claimed to have been attacked by a rabbit while canoeing. He beat the rabbit off with a paddle).
  • 1943 Jerry Martini of the music group ‘Sly & The Family Stone’ was born.
  • 1968 Flesh eating Zombies are on the loose as George Romero’s horror film ‘Night of the Living Dead’ is released.
  • 1971 Disney World opened at Orlando, Florida.
  • 1972 Louis Leakey died. Anthropologist largely responsible for convincing scientists that Africa was the place to search for human origins, not Java or China. Together with his wife Mary, they made many significant fossil discoveries.
  • 1974 The first McDonald’s restaurant opened in London.
  • 1980 European Community countries banned the use of hormones in cattle feed.
  • 2006 Sometime during October 2006 the population of the U.S. will reach 300 million.
  • 2006 The New Orleans  landmark restaurant, Commander’s Palace, reopened. It had been closed since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in August, 2005.
  • 2009 McDonald’s closed its 3 locations in Iceland this month due to the ‘complex operational environment.’
  • 2011 World population is expected to hit 7 billion this month.

November 9 is National Chocolate Cupcake Day

Posted on November 9, 2014

Here are today’s five thing to know about Chocolate Cupcake:

  1.  Cupcake liners do more than make it easy to remove them from the pan. Traditionally, sides of tins are greased for easy removal, but also floured because the batter needs to have something to cling to. A cupcake liner takes care of both.
  2. On August 15, 2009 GourmetGiftBaskets.com broke the world record for largest cupcake ever made. The cupcake was 1,224 pounds, 4 foot tall by 10 foot wide, and had 2 million calories.
  3. One of the most popular cupcake bakery’s in the U.S. is Crumbs in New York City. They have reported $23.5 million in cupcake revenue last year alone!
  4. The first mention of a cupcake recipe goes as far back as 1796. Amelia Simms wrote a recipe in “American Cookery” which referenced, “a cake to be baked in small cups”.
  5.  However, it wasn’t until 1828 that the actual word cupcake was used by Eliza Leslie in her cookbook “Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats”.

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1801 Gail Borden born. Inventor of process for making condensed milk, and founder of New York Condensed Milk Co. (later renamed Borden Co).
  • 1857 The first issue of the Atlantic Monthly was published. It contained the first installment of Oliver Wendell Holmes’ ‘The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table.’
  • 1891 George A. Hormel opened his packinghouse in Austin, Minnesota.
  • 1911 George Claude applied for a patent for an electric neon sign. It was issued on January 19, 1915.
  • 1938 Edward Murray East died. An American botanist and chemist he helped with the development of hybrid corn. Specifically, he concentrated on controlling the protein and fat content of possible hybrids.
  • 1948‘More Beer’ is recorded by the Ames Brothers.
  • 1953 Dylan Thomas, Welsh poet, died at the Chelsea Hotel in New York. He had consumed 18 straight martinis.
  • 1961 During lunchtime, Brian Epstein heard the Beatles for the first time at The Cavern in Liverpool.
  • 1963 The enigmatic ‘Louie Louie’ was released by the Kingsmen.
  • 1965 At 5:15 p.m. a 13 hour blackout of the northeastern U.S. and parts of Canada began when the electric grid failed.

Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4


 

National Chocolate Cupcake Day

Posted on November 9, 2013

5 Star Recipe from MyRecipes.com

National Chocolate Cupcake Day

Five Food Finds about Cupcakes

  •  Cupcake liners do more than make it easy to remove them from the pan. Traditionally, sides of tins are greased for easy removal, but also floured because the batter needs to have something to cling to. A cupcake liner takes care of both.
  • On August 15, 2009 GourmetGiftBaskets.com broke the world record for largest cupcake ever made. The cupcake was 1,224 pounds, 4 foot tall by 10 foot wide, and had 2 million calories.
  • One of the most popular cupcake bakery’s in the U.S. is Crumbs in New York City. They have reported $23.5 million in cupcake revenue last year alone!
  • The first mention of a cupcake recipe goes as far back as 1796. Amelia Simms wrote a recipe in “American Cookery” which referenced, “a cake to be baked in small cups”.
  •  However, it wasn’t until 1828 that the actual word cupcake was used by Eliza Leslie in her cookbook “Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats”.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1801 Gail Borden born. Inventor of process for making condensed milk, and founder of New York Condensed Milk Co. (later renamed Borden Co).
1857 The first issue of the Atlantic Monthly was published. It contained the first installment of Oliver Wendell Holmes’ ‘The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table.’
1891 George A. Hormel opened his packinghouse in Austin, Minnesota.
1911 George Claude applied for a patent for an electric neon sign. It was issued on January 19, 1915.
1938 Edward Murray East died. An American botanist and chemist he helped with the development of hybrid corn. Specifically, he concentrated on controlling the protein and fat content of possible hybrids.
1948‘More Beer’ is recorded by the Ames Brothers.
1953 Dylan Thomas, Welsh poet, died at the Chelsea Hotel in New York. He had consumed 18 straight martinis.
1961 During lunchtime, Brian Epstein heard the Beatles for the first time at The Cavern in Liverpool.
1963 The enigmatic ‘Louie Louie’ was released by the Kingsmen.
1965 At 5:15 p.m. a 13 hour blackout of the northeastern U.S. and parts of Canada began when the electric grid failed.

November 9 – National Chocolate Cupcake Day

Posted on November 9, 2012

5 Star Recipe from MyRecipes.com

National Chocolate Cupcake Day

Five Food Finds about Cupcakes

  •  Cupcake liners do more than make it easy to remove them from the pan. Traditionally, sides of tins are greased for easy removal, but also floured because the batter needs to have something to cling to. A cupcake liner takes care of both.
  • On August 15, 2009 GourmetGiftBaskets.com broke the world record for largest cupcake ever made. The cupcake was 1,224 pounds, 4 foot tall by 10 foot wide, and had 2 million calories.
  • One of the most popular cupcake bakery’s in the U.S. is Crumbs in New York City. They have reported $23.5 million in cupcake revenue last year alone!
  • The first mention of a cupcake recipe goes as far back as 1796. Amelia Simms wrote a recipe in “American Cookery” which referenced, “a cake to be baked in small cups”.
  •  However, it wasn’t until 1828 that the actual word cupcake was used by Eliza Leslie in her cookbook “Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats”.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1801 Gail Borden born. Inventor of process for making condensed milk, and founder of New York Condensed Milk Co. (later renamed Borden Co).
1857 The first issue of the Atlantic Monthly was published. It contained the first installment of Oliver Wendell Holmes’ ‘The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table.’
1891 George A. Hormel opened his packinghouse in Austin, Minnesota.
1911 George Claude applied for a patent for an electric neon sign. It was issued on January 19, 1915.
1938 Edward Murray East died. An American botanist and chemist he helped with the development of hybrid corn. Specifically, he concentrated on controlling the protein and fat content of possible hybrids.
1948‘More Beer’ is recorded by the Ames Brothers.
1953 Dylan Thomas, Welsh poet, died at the Chelsea Hotel in New York. He had consumed 18 straight martinis.
1961 During lunchtime, Brian Epstein heard the Beatles for the first time at The Cavern in Liverpool.
1963 The enigmatic ‘Louie Louie’ was released by the Kingsmen.
1965 At 5:15 p.m. a 13 hour blackout of the northeastern U.S. and parts of Canada began when the electric grid failed.

October 2 – National World Farm Animals Day

Posted on October 2, 2012

National Wild Farm Animals Day

Five Food Finds about Pigs

  • Pig insulin is used to control diabetes.
  • They are lean by nature, but are commonly overfed by their owners.
  • Pigs are the 5th most intelligent animal on earth behind man, monkeys, dolphins, and whales.  They can even problem solve!
  • They are the only mammal found in every part of the world.
  • Pigs are easier to train than dogs.  They can fetch your paper and even be potty trained.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1795 Robert Bakewell died. Bakewell was an agriculturalist who helped revolutionize cattle and sheep breeding in England. He obtained the best animals he could find and then worked with a closed herd, inbreeding only superior animals.

1908 The Model T Ford was introduced at a price of $825. Due to efficient mass production, by 1925 the price of a 2 door Model T was only $260.

1913 A monument to honor sea gulls was erected in Salt Lake City. The gulls had eaten the plague of grasshoppers that threatened the Mormon settlers crops in 1848.

1916 The first Piggly-Wiggly supermarket opened.

1924 James Earl (Jimmy) Carter was born. He was a peanut farmer, and 39th president of the U.S. (He also claimed to have been attacked by a rabbit while canoeing. He beat the rabbit off with a paddle).

1943 Jerry Martini of the music group ‘Sly & The Family Stone’ was born.

1971 Disney World opened at Orlando, Florida.

1972 Louis Leakey died. Anthropologist largely responsible for convincing scientists that Africa was the place to search for human origins, not Java or China. Together with his wife Mary, they made many significant fossil discoveries.

1974 The first McDonald’s restaurant opened in London.

1980 European Community countries banned the use of hormones in cattle feed.

2006 Sometime during October 2006 the population of the U.S. will reach 300 million.

2006 The New Orleans  landmark restaurant, Commander’s Palace, reopened. It had been closed since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in August, 2005.

2009 McDonald’s closed its 3 locations in Iceland this month due to the ‘complex operational environment.’

November 9 – Today’s Food History

Posted on November 9, 2011

 National Chocolate Cupcake Day

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

  • 1801 Gail Borden born. Inventor of process for making condensed milk, and founder of New York Condensed Milk Co. (later renamed Borden Co).
  • 1857 The first issue of the Atlantic Monthly was published. It contained the first installment of Oliver Wendell Holmes’ ‘The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table.’
  • 1891 George A. Hormel opened his packinghouse in Austin, Minnesota.
  • 1911 George Claude applied for a patent for an electric neon sign. It was issued on January 19, 1915.
  • 1938 Edward Murray East died. An American botanist and chemist he helped with the development of hybrid corn. Specifically, he concentrated on controlling the protein and fat content of possible hybrids.
  • 1948‘More Beer’ is recorded by the Ames Brothers.
  • 1953 Dylan Thomas, Welsh poet, died at the Chelsea Hotel in New York. He had consumed 18 straight martinis.
  • 1961 During lunchtime, Brian Epstein heard the Beatles for the first time at The Cavern in Liverpool.
  • 1963 The enigmatic ‘Louie Louie’ was released by the Kingsmen.
  • 1965 At 5:15 p.m. a 13 hour blackout of the northeastern U.S. and parts of Canada began when the electric grid failed.

June Holidays

Posted on November 10, 2009

National Candy Month National Dairy Month National Fresh Fruit and Vegetables Month National Iced Tea Month National Papaya Month First Friday in June: National Donut Day Daily Holidays June 1 National Hazelnut Cake Day June 2 National Rocky Road Day National Rotisserie Chicken Day June 3 National Chocolate Macaroon Day National Egg Day June 4 National Cheese Day June 5 National Ketchup / Catsup Day June 6 National Gingerbread Day June 7 National Chocolate Ice Cream Day June 8 National Jelly-Filled Doughnut Day June 9 National Strawberry-Rhubarb Pie Day June 10 National Iced-Tea Day   June 11 National German Chocolate Cake Day June 12 National Peanut Butter Cookie Day International Falafel Day June 13 Cupcake Lover’s Day June 14 National Strawberry Shortcake Day June…

Pfeffernusse

Posted on January 5, 2011

Pfeffernüsse (also spelled pfeffernuesse in English, in Danish: pebernødder (plural) and pepernoten in Dutch; singular Pfeffernuss) are small, hard, round biscuits with ground nuts. The name translates to pepper nuts in German, Danish and Dutch, describing their spicy taste as well as the fact that many recipes actually call for almonds or walnuts and a small amount of black pepper to be used. Pepernoten are originally a Dutch treat[citation needed], baked during ‘Sinterklaas’, a feast on 5 December (6 December in Belgium and Germany) on which little children receive gifts from the holy St. Nicholas, the original of and the inspiration for Santa Claus. In Germany, Pfeffernüsse are traditionally made during the Christmas season. Recipes often call for the dough to be rounded into…

  

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