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November 5th is National Chinese Take-Out Day! 🍲🥟🥠

Posted on November 5, 2018

High-res version

Here are today’s five thing to know about Chinese take-out:

The foundations for what we know as Chinese food were laid in the mid-1800s, when a huge influx of Chinese immigrants came to California during the Gold Rush.

rb03643-01

When American Chinese restaurants first stepped out into mainstream culture, restaurants offered two menus: a Chinese menu and an American menu. The American  menu soon became the only menu due to the crowds of young Americans hungry for savory sauces found in the American Chinese dishes.

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The folded paper boxes that have now become a staple of American Chinese food were traditionally used to transport oysters.

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Despite their popularity in American Chinese dishes, broccoli, tomatoes, carrots, and yellow onions aren’t typically found in actual Chinese restaurants because they aren’t vegetables native to China.


Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary


Today’s Food History

  • 1714 Bernardino Ramazzini died. An Italian physician, he was the first to note the relationship between worker’s illnesses and their work environment. Considered the founder of occupational medicine.
  • 1854 Paul Sabatier was born. Organic chemist who researched catalytic organic synthesis. The margarine, oil hydrogenation and methanol industries grew out of his research.
  • 1893 Raymond Loewy was born. An American design engineer, he designed the Coca Cola bottle, the 1934 Sears Coldspot refrigerator, toothbrushes, etc.
  • 1946 Musician Gram Parsons was born. Member of the Byrds and the Flying Burrito Brothers.
  • 1963 Viking ruins were found by archaeologists in Newfoundland, dated to about the year 1,000. Leif Ericson had landed at ‘Vinland’ – 500 years before Columbus ‘discovered’ the New World.
  • 2000 David Ross Brower died. Brower was the founder of many environmental organizations including the Friends of the Earth and Earth Island Institute.

Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4


April 9th is National Chinese Almond Cookie Day!

Posted on April 9, 2018

High-res version

Happy National Chinese Almond Cookie Day!

The Cookie of Good Luck.

Here are today’s five food facts to know about Chinese Almond Cookies:

 

  • In Mandarin Chinese, these are more literally called “Almond Cakes.”
  • The Chinese Almond Cookie is native to southern and southeast China.
  • There is no record of these cookies before the 1900’s.

 

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  • The Chinese commonly prepared Almond milk and Almond tea.
  • An American variation exists using pecans.

 

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Fun Fact:

Typical to southern and southeastern China, these almond cookies are usually enjoyed around Chinese New Year, and are given as gifts to family and friends.

In some Chinese restaurants, they are served to cleanse the palate after several courses, rather than being regarded as a dessert.

Yuan-Shan Chi declared these cookies “as Chinese as blueberry pie.”

 

Today’s Food History

o    1626 R.I.P. Sir Francis Bacon. An English statesman, philosopher and author of ‘Novum Organum’, a work on scientific inquiry. Some also claim he wrote the plays attributed to Shakespeare. He died after having stuffed a dressed chicken with snow to see how long the flesh could be preserved by the extreme cold. He caught cold and died from complications about a month later.

o    1682 Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle discovered the mouth of the Mississippi River and claimed the whole Mississippi Basin for France. He named it Louisiana, in honor of Louis XIV of France.

o    1770 Capt. James Cook discovered Botany Bay on the Australian continent.

o    1850 R.I.P William Prout.  An English chemist, he was the first to classify food components into 3 main divisions – carbohydrates, fats and proteins.

o    1872 Samuel R. Percy of New York received a patent for dried milk.

o    1965 The entire cast of the comic strip ‘Peanuts’ was featured on the cover of TIME magazine


Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4


November 5th is National Chinese Take-Out Day!

Posted on November 5, 2017

High-res version

Here are today’s five thing to know about Chinese take-out:

The foundations for what we know as Chinese food were laid in the mid-1800s, when a huge influx of Chinese immigrants came to California during the Gold Rush.

rb03643-01

When American Chinese restaurants first stepped out into mainstream culture, restaurants offered two menus: a Chinese menu and an American menu. The American  menu soon became the only menu due to the crowds of young Americans hungry for savory sauces found in the American Chinese dishes.

giphy

The folded paper boxes that have now become a staple of American Chinese food were traditionally used to transport oysters.

giphy1

Despite their popularity in American Chinese dishes, broccoli, tomatoes, carrots, and yellow onions aren’t typically found in actual Chinese restaurants because they aren’t vegetables native to China.


Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary


Today’s Food History

  • 1714 Bernardino Ramazzini died. An Italian physician, he was the first to note the relationship between worker’s illnesses and their work environment. Considered the founder of occupational medicine.
  • 1854 Paul Sabatier was born. Organic chemist who researched catalytic organic synthesis. The margarine, oil hydrogenation and methanol industries grew out of his research.
  • 1893 Raymond Loewy was born. An American design engineer, he designed the Coca Cola bottle, the 1934 Sears Coldspot refrigerator, toothbrushes, etc.
  • 1946 Musician Gram Parsons was born. Member of the Byrds and the Flying Burrito Brothers.
  • 1963 Viking ruins were found by archaeologists in Newfoundland, dated to about the year 1,000. Leif Ericson had landed at ‘Vinland’ – 500 years before Columbus ‘discovered’ the New World.
  • 2000 David Ross Brower died. Brower was the founder of many environmental organizations including the Friends of the Earth and Earth Island Institute.

Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4


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