Posts from the “101 – lessons in food” Category

February 17 is Café au Lait Day

Posted on February 17, 2015

myvirtualcoffeehouse.com

myvirtualcoffeehouse.com

Here are today’s five thing to know about Café au Lait:

  1. In Europe, “café au lait” stems from the same continental tradition as “café con leche” in Spain,
  2. In Poland it is referred to as “kawa biała” (“white coffee”)
  3. In Germany it is referred to as “Milchkaffee” (“milk coffee”)
  4. In The Netherlands “koffie verkeerd” (“incorrect coffee”)
  5. In the French-speaking areas of Switzerland, a popular variation is the “café renversé” (“reverse coffee”), made by using the milk as a base and adding espresso, in reversal of the normal method of making a “café au lait”.

Daily Quote:

“True Love is a hard nut to crack, but it has the sweetest kernel.”~Spanish Proverb

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1665 Rudolph Jacob Camerarius was born. A German botanist, he showed the existence of sexes in plants, and identified the stamen and pistil as the male and female organs.
  • 1876 Canned sardines went on sale in the U.S. for the first time. They were packed in oil.
  • (Some sources say 1873).
  • 1889 H.L. Hunt, the pioneering Texas oil millionaire (Hunt Oil Company) was born. He carried a brown bag lunch to his office each day and considered himself as ‘just plain folks.’
  • 1958‘Sugartime’ by the McGuire Sister topped the charts.
  • 2002 New regulations to go into effect this year require German pig farmers to spend at least 20 seconds every day with each pig, 10 seconds in the morning and 10 seconds in the afternoon. I do not know about what regulations there might be for spending time with German cows, sheep, chickens and other farm animals.
  • 2008 The USDA announced the largest beef recall of 143 million pounds of frozen beef from a California slaughterhouse.

 

Origins of the Margarita

Posted on February 22, 2014

 

 Origins of the Margarita
 
 
  The following are perhaps the most commonly repeated tales of the creator of the margarita cocktail:
 
1.Sammy Cruz, 1948
According to the promotional flyer for the legendary Balinese Room in Galveston, Texas, head bartender Santos Cruz created the Margarita for singer Peggy (Margaret) Lee in 1948.
 
2. The Balinese Room was opened in 1941 and was Texas’s finest nightclub with A/C, casino gambling, superb food and drinks, and stellar entertainment until the Texas Rangers finally shut it down in 1957.
 
3. Barman “Willie” from Mexico City, 1934 in the employ of the Melguizo Family Marguerite Hemery lived in the Rio Grande Valley since the 1930s and went to a restaurant in Matamoros called Los Dos Republicas. She was friends with the owner and, as the story goes, his bartender composed a special drink for her.
Danny Negrete, 1936
 
4. According to Salvador Negrete, the son of Daniel Negrete, the family story goes that Daniel opened a bar at the Garci Crispo hotel with his brother, David. The day before David’s marriage, Daniel presented the margarita as a wedding present to Margarita, his sister-in-law. It was a combination of one-third Triple Sec, one-third tequila and one-third squeezed Mexican lime juice. The drink was not blended and was served with hand-crushed ice.
 
5. Enrique Bastate Gutierrez, early 1940s
Gutierrez, who lived in Tijuana, Mexico, boasted to have created the Margarita as a homage to actress Rita Hayworth, whose real name was Margarita Cansino. Other versions of the story claim the Margarita was indeed named after the actress, but in the 1930s, before she adopted her screen name. As a teenager, Margarita Cansino worked as a dancer at the Foreign Club, in Tijuana, where she supposedly inspired a bartender.
 
 
 
 
 

Mysteries of the Raisin

Posted on April 30, 2012

Did you know? Raisins are typically sun-dried, but may also be water-dipped, or dehydrated. “Golden raisins” are made from sultanas, treated with sulfur dioxide (SO2), and flame-dried to give them their characteristic color. Raisin varieties depend on the type of grape used, and are made in a variety of sizes and colors including green, black, blue, purple, and yellow. Seedless varieties include the sultana (also known as Thompson Seedless in the USA) and Flame grapes. A particular variety of seedless grape, the Black Corinth, is also sun-dried to produce Zante currants, miniature raisins that are much darker in color and have a tart, tangy flavor. Several varieties of raisins are produced in Asia and, in the West, are only available at ethnic specialty grocers.…

Know your shrimp!

Posted on April 29, 2012

Did you know?  All shrimp were not created equal.  Here are a few tips on telling the good from the bad. Shrimp are marketed and commercialised with several issues in mind. Most shrimp are sold frozen and marketed based on their categorisation of presentation, grading, color, and uniformity. The main forms of presentation are head on shell on (HOSO), shell on (SO or “green headless shrimp”), peeled tail on (PTO), peeled undeveined (PUD), peeled and deveined (P&D), and butterfly tail on (BTTY-TO). Sometimes a letter ‘F’ is placed in front of these abbreviation for the presentation in order to state that the shrimp comes from a farm (example: FSO – farmed, shell on). European and Asian markets prefer the HOSO presentation (which is a…

Everything You Need to Know about Blueberries

Posted on April 28, 2012

Did you know that blueberries are one of the only natural foods that are truly blue in color?  You won’t find many others! Maine is the blueberry production capital of North America and produces almost 100 percent of all berries harvested in the country. America’s favorite muffin is blueberry. July is national blueberry month because that is the peak of the harvest season. The pale, powder-like protective coating on the skin of blueberries is called “bloom.” The annual harvest of North American blueberries would cover a four lane highway from Chicago to New York if spread out in a single layer. The anthocyanin present in blueberries is good for eyesight. Blueberries contain more antioxidants than most other fruits or vegetables and may help prevent…

Origins of the Pretzel

Posted on April 26, 2012

Did you know that pretzels got their start in the early church?  As early as 610AD at a monastery somewhere in Southern France or Northern Italy, where monks used scraps of dough and formed them into strips to represent a child’s arms folded in prayer. The three empty holes represented the Christian Trinity. As with a lot of foods, the exact origin of the pretzel is unknown. The monks offered the warm, doughy bribe to children who had memorized their Bible verses and prayers. The monks called it a Pretiola, Latin for little reward. From there, the pretzel transformed into the Italian word, Brachiola, which means little arms. The Pretiola journeyed beyond the French and Italian wine regions, hiked the Alps, wandered through Austria,…

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