Posts from the “October Food Holidays” Category

The official 2019 ‘Food Holiday’ list

Posted on February 26, 2019

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January 7th is National Tempura Day!

Posted on January 7, 2019

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Did you know?

Tempura is actually a Portuguese form of cooking. Introduced to Japan in the 1500’s by Jesuit Priests.


Today’s 5 facts about Tempura:


  1. Tempura was considered a local delicacy in Nagasaki, Japan for well over 100 years.
  2. Tokugawa Ieyasu, considered the first Shogun of Japan, reportedly loved tempura.
  3. The word “tempura” comes from the word “tempora”, a Latin word meaning “times.”
  4. Outside Japan there are many nontraditional uses of tempura. Chefs over the world include tempura dishes on their menus, and a wide variety of different batters and ingredients are used, including the nontraditional broccoli, zucchini, sliced sweet potatoes, and asparagus.
  5. No Panko or Breadcrumbs are used in Tempura, as this method of using breadcrumbs is called Furai.


Today’s Food History

  • 1618 Francis Bacon became Lord Chancellor of England.
  • 1827 Sir Sanford Fleming was born. He devised the present system of time zones while working for the Canadian Pacific Railway.
  • 1896 The ‘Fannie Farmer Cookbook’ was published.
    1901 Alfred Packer is released from prison. He served 18 years for cannibalism after being stranded in the Rocky Mountains. (Actually he was convicted of murder, since cannibalism was not against the law).
  • 1958 Ant Farms go on sale. Milton Levine had the idea at a July 4th family picnic. I wonder if he had dreams of fencing them in so they would not bother him at picnics?
    1972 “American Pie” by Don McLean is #1 on the charts.

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The official 2019 ‘Food Holiday’ list

Posted on January 1, 2019

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October 31st is National Caramel Apple Day! / #Halloween

Posted on October 31, 2018

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Here are today’s five things to know about the caramel apple:

Candy Apples were first introduced in Arabian cuisine. The reason was that fruit was candied to preserve it.

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Americans have over the years turned that practice into gigantic apples covered everything from red candy and caramel to chocolate, peanuts, popcorn, and more chocolate.

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Soldiers in World War I slanged them “toffee apples.”  Candy Apples are popular all over the world.

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England celebrates Guy Fawkes Day with caramel apples on November 5.

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Everything from a Kool-Aid flavor to a nail-polish shade has been named candy apple red.


Today’s Food History

  • 1826 Noah Cushing was issued a patent for a threshing and winnowing machine.
  • 1831 Carl von Voit was born. German physiologist whose work on metabolism helped establish modern nutritional science.
  • 1888 Scottish inventor John Boyd Dunlop was issued a patent for pneumatic bicycle tires.
  • 1917 Patience Gray, British cookery writer, was born. ’Plats Du Jour’ (1957), ‘Honey From A Weed’(1986)
  • 1920 Justice Oliver Wendell Homes handed down the decision of the Supreme Court, which upheld trademark violations for The ‘Coca- Cola Company’ against ‘The Koke Company of America’.
  • 1950 John Candy was born. Canadian comedian and actor, member of ‘The Second City’ comedy troupe.
  • 1981 Dunkin’ Donuts opened its first store in Thailand.
  • 1982 Waverley Root, cookbook and food author died in Paris at age 79.
  • 2007 David Tallichet, founder of Specialty Restaurants Corp, died. A former WW II pilot, most of the restaurants have aviation themes, or are located on prime waterfront or hilltop properties.

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October 30th is National Candy Corn Day!

Posted on October 30, 2018

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Happy National Candy Corn Day

Did you know candy corn started as a gimmick to prove the goodness of corn sugar?

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Here are today’s facts to know about Candy Corn:

  • One serving of candy corn contains only about 140 calories.
  • Candy corn has 3.57 calories per kernel.
  • More than 35 million pounds of candy corn will be produced this year. That equates to nearly 9 billion pieces — enough to circle the moon nearly four times if laid end-to-end.
  • Halloween accounts for 75% of the annual candy corn production.
  • A cup of candy corn has fewer calories than a cup of raisins.

Today’s Food History

  • 1815 Andrew Jackson Downing was born. American horticulturist, author of ‘The Fruits and Fruit Trees of America’ (1845) and editor of the ‘Horticulturist’ periodical.
  • 1894 The first U.S. patent for a time clock was issued to Daniel Cooper of Rochester, New York.
  • 1990 ‘Ice Ice Baby’ by Vanilla Ice is #1 on the charts.

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October 28th is National Chocolate Day! / #NationalChocolateDay

Posted on October 28, 2018

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Happy National Chocolate Day!

Did you know the smell of chocolate is a natural calming agent?

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Here’s a Foodimentary look at he history of Chocolate 


Here are today’s five thing to know about Chocolate:

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  • White chocolate originates from the cocoa (cacao) plant, but it is not ‘chocolate.’
  • Switzerland is one of the top countries for chocolate consumption. The Swiss consume about 22 lbs of chocolate, per person, per year.giphy24
  • Most cocoa comes from West Africa.
  • Allowing chocolate to melt in your mouth produces the same or even stronger reactions as passionately kissing.
  •  Cocoa beans were used as currency by the Mayan and Aztec cultures. Perhaps this is where they saying “Money grows on trees” came from.

Today in Food History

  • 1846 (Georges-) Auguste Escoffier was born. Escoffier was called “the emperor of chefs” and “emperor of the world’s kitchens” by Emperor William II of Germany. He modernized and codified the elaborate haute cuisine created by Marie-Antoine Carême, and developed the ‘brigade de cuisine,’ system of kitchen organization. Escoffier was chef at the Carlton Hotel in London, the Grande National Hotel in Lucerne, Switzerland, the Grand Hotel in Monte Carlo, the Savoy in London and the Ritz hotels in Paris and New York City. His books include ‘Guide culinaire’ and ‘Ma Cuisine.’
  • 1886 The Statue of Liberty (‘Liberty Enlightening the World’) was officially unveiled and dedicated in New York Harbor.
  • 1916 Cleveland Abbe died. Abbe was an astronomer and meteorologist, and is considered the “father of the U.S. Weather Bureau.” The Weather Bureau (National Weather Service) was authorized by Congress in 1870.
  • 1919 The Volstead Act was passed, which enforced the 18th amendment, prohibiting the sale of alcoholic beverages. It went into effect on January 16, 1920.

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Cheers! October 27th is National American Beer Day!

Posted on October 27, 2018

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Todays five food facts about beer:

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The bittering agent in beer, Hops, is closely related to marijuana.

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Brown bottles are designed to keep beer fresh.

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The average American consumes nearly 23 gallons of beer annually.

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According to broadcasting regulations, American beer commercials are not allowed to show anyone consuming alcohol.

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Obama is the first American President to brew his own beer.

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Today’s Food History

1728 Captain James Cook was born. British explorer who charted and named many Pacific Islands, including the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii).

1806 Alphonse Pyrame de Candolle was born. A Swiss botanist, author of ‘Origin of Cultivated Plants.’

1872 Emily Post was born. (or on October 3, 1873). Etiquette expert, newspaper columnist, author of ‘Etiquette in Society, in Business, in Politics, and at Home’ (1922); ‘The Emily Post Cook Book’(1949); ‘Motor Manners’ (1950).

1873 Joseph F. Glidden applied for a patent for barbed wire.

1904 The first subway (underground) rail system in New York City began operating.  The Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT) line was 21 miles long.

1930 ‘Gorgonzola’ was recorded by Jack Hylton & His Orchestra with Leslie Sarony

1975 Rex Stout, American crime writer died. More than 70 of his novels and stories feature the fictional gourmand/gourmet detective, Nero Wolfe. Archie Goodwin, the detective’s assistant, described him as weighing “one seventh of a ton” (about 286 pounds). Shad Roe and Duck were two of Wolfe’s favorites, and he also consumed copious amounts of beer. Stout also published ‘The Nero Wolfe Cookbook’ in 1973.


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