Posts tagged “breakfast

September 14 is National Cream-Filled Doughnut Day

Posted on September 14, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Doughnuts :

  1. In the U.S. alone, more than 10 billion donuts are made every year.
  2. Between our 27 locations, LaMar’s Donuts produces 344,700 donuts per week, which is 17.9 million donuts per year.
  3. A Ray’s Original Glazed Donut has only 220 calories, while a bagel and cream cheese averages 450 calories.
  4. Per capita, Canada has more donuts shops than any other country.
  5. The Dutch are often credited with bringing donuts to the U.S. with their olykoeks, or oily cakes in the 1800s.

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Today’s Pinterest Board :  Doughnut

Today’s Food History

  • 1752 Yesterday was September 2, 1752. No, really!
  • 1849 Ivan Petrovich Pavlov was born. Pavlov’s work with dogs actually started as a study of digestion. He theorized that digestion was controlled in part by sensory inputs of sight, smell and taste – and as he discovered, sound; ‘conditioned reflex.’
  • 1976 ‘Play That Funky Music’ by Wild Cherry is #1 on the charts
  • 2006 The U.S. FDA reported an outbreak of E. coli 0157:H7. Fresh spinach is the suspected cause of the outbreak and consumers nationwide were advised not to eat bagged spinach.  Eventually more than 200 people were sickened in 22 states and several deaths were reported.

September 2 is National “Grits for Breakfast” Day

Posted on September 2, 2015

Celebrate the Southern breakfast of champions.

Here are today’s five thing to know about Grits:

  1. Grits (also sometimes called sofkee or sofkey from the Muskogee word) are a food of Native American origin common in the Southern United States and usually eaten at breakfast.
  2. They consist of coarsely ground corn, or sometimes alkali-treated corn.
  3. Grits are similar to other thick maize-based porridges from around the world, such as polenta, or the thinner farina.
  4. Grits are usually prepared by adding one part grits to two-to-three parts boiling water, sometimes seasoned with salt or sugar.
  5. They are usually cooked for 5–10 minutes for “quick” grits or 20 or more minutes for whole kernel grits, or until the water is absorbed and the grits become a porridge-like consistency.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Grits

Today’s Food History

  • 1666 The Great Fire of London began in the shop of the King’s baker. After burning for four days, more than 13,000 buildings had been destroyed.
  • 1752 Tomorrow was September 14. The Gregorian Calendar went into effect in Great Britain and its colonies, to correct an accumulated 11 day discrepancy. Most of the rest of the world had switched from the Julian Calendar to the Gregorian Calendar in 1582.
  • 1935 The Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 hit the Florida Keys. Over 400 were killed and the Railroad to Key West was destroyed. It was the most powerful hurricane to ever hit the U.S., with winds estimated at 200 mph.
  • 1969 The first ATM is installed at the Chemical Bank in  Rockville Centre, New York.
  • 1985 The wreckage of the British luxury liner ‘Titanic’ was located 73 years after it sank. This inspired a new interest in the menu and last meals that were served on the ship.

National Oatmeal Cookie Day

Posted on March 19, 2013

National Oatmeal Cookie Day

Five Food Finds about Oatmeal

  • Oats were one of the earliest cereals cultivated by man. They were known in ancient China as long ago as 7,000 B.C. The ancient Greeks were the first people known to have made a recognizable porridge (cereal) from oats
  • Oatmeal cookies are the #1 non-cereal usage for oatmeal, followed by meatloaf and fruit crisp
  • .Seventy-five percent of U.S. households have oatmeal in their cupboard
  • The portrait of the Quaker man on the Quaker® Oats package has been updated just three times since its creation in 1877, once in 1946, again in 1957 and, most recently, in 1972.
  • Quaker Oats was the first U.S. breakfast cereal to receive a registered trademark, the first to offer a recipe and a premium on its package, and the first to offer trial-size samples.

Daily Quote

“There’s an oatmeal cookie in there? I see no reason for the existence of oatmeal, particularly in cookies.”

~Oscar the Grouch

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1936 Canned beer is sold to the public in Britain for the first time, by Felinfoel Brewery in Wales.

1942 Clinton Hart Merriam died. A biologist, he studied the effects of using birds to control agricultural pests. He also helped found the National Geographic Society, and what is now known as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service


March 10 – National Blueberry Popover Day

Posted on March 10, 2012

National Blueberry Popover Day

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1845 RIP John Chapman, ‘Johnny Appleseed’ ,an American pioneer and legend, he planted apple seeds in the Ohio River valley area (Ohio, Indiana, Illinois)

1867 Lillian D. Wald was born. She was a scientist and nurse, and among her activities, she helped initiate the enactment of pure food laws in the U.S.

1873 RIP John Torrey, he was the first professional botanist in the New World.

1914 At the National Gallery in London, a suffragette slashed Diego Velázquez’s ‘Rokeby Venus’ with a meat cleaver.

March 7 – National Cereal Day

Posted on March 7, 2012

National Cereal Day

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1804 John Wedgwood, the son of Josiah Wedgwood of pottery fame, founded the Royal Horticultural Society.

1849 Luther Burbank was born. American horticulturist, he developed many new varieties of fruits and vegetables, including the Burbank Potato (1873), the Shasta Daisy, over 100 varieties of plums and prunes and 10 varieties of berries.

1897 Dr. John Kellogg served corn flakes for the first time to his patients at his hospital in Battle Creek, Michigan. They wouldn’t be sold commercially until 1906.

1914 The Coca Cola Bottler’s Association was formed.

What kind of biscuit do you like?

Posted on March 1, 2012

I am a life-long Southerner, and I have to say that biscuits are breakfast staple!

I like a warm, fresh buttermilk biscuit with a spicy sausage patty and a shot of hot sauce.  I want my biscuit crisp on the top and bottom and tender in the middle.

Now you can have a bad biscuit:  They can be too dry, doughy and under cooked, or — worst of all — burned on the bottom.

I’ll never forget a visit to my Yankee aunt’s house.  Bless her heart, she decided to cook me a “Southern” breakfast.

The biscuits were starchy and burned on the bottom.  Someone forgot to tell her how to season her iron skillet.  The sausage patty was like biting into a greasy hockey puck.  I won’t even tell you what the grits were like.  I try to block it out.  It was bad.

Being the true Southerner that I am (you fellow Southerners know what I’m talking about) I just smiled and chewed and tried my best to look like I was eating manna from Heaven.  There was no dog to slip the biscuit to.  I don’t think a dog would have been interested.

There are all kinds of biscuit combinations:

You can put jelly on them, bacon on them, gravy on them, ham on them, eggs on them, sausage on them, chicken on them, steak on them… I feel like Bubba Blue! I don’t think “scrimps” and biscuits mix for breakfast though.

So what kind of biscuit do YOU like for breakfast?

Heck, down here we can have them any time!

You can have biscuits on the side with fried chicken, with vegetable soup, use them as dumplings… Stop me!

Biscuit

Posted on May 7, 2010

A biscuit (pronounced /ˈbɪskɨt/) is a baked edible product. The word applies to two distinctly different products in American and British English. The need for nutritious, easy to store, easy to carry, and long-lasting foods on long journeys, particularly at sea, was initially solved by taking live food along with a butcher/cook. However, this took up additional space on what were either horse-powered treks or small ships, reducing the time of travel before additional food was required. This resulted in early armies adopting the style of hunter-foraging. The introduction of the baking of processed cereals including the creation of flour, provided a more reliable source of food. Egyptian sailors carried a flat brittle loaf of millet bread called dhourra cake, while the Romans had…

Pigs in Blankets

Posted on April 30, 2010

Pigs in blankets (also known as pigs in the blanket, pigs in blankets, devils on horsebacks, wiener winks, worstjes in deeg, kilted sausages, wild willies) refers to a few different sausage-based foods in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, Germany, the Netherlands, Russia, Canada, and Japan. They are often different from sausage rolls. In the United Kingdom, “pigs in blankets” refers to small sausages (usually chipolatas) wrapped in bacon. Usually served at Christmas lunch or with roast dinners, pigs in blankets are now considered a traditional part of the Christmas meal. Pigs in blankets can be accompanied with devils on horseback, an appetizer of prunes, or less commonly dates, wrapped in bacon. Pigs in blankets can also refer to chipolata sausages wrapped in pastry.…

Eggs Benedict

Posted on April 17, 2010

There are differing accounts as to the origin of eggs Benedict. In an interview in the “Talk of the Town” column of The New Yorker in 1942, the year before his death,[1] Lemuel Benedict, a retired Wall Street stock broker, claimed that he had wandered into the Waldorf Hotel in 1894 and, hoping to find a cure for his morning hangover, ordered “buttered toast, poached eggs, crisp bacon and a hooker of hollandaise.” Oscar Tschirky, the famed maître d’hôtel, was so impressed with the dish that he put it on the breakfast and luncheon menus but substituted ham and a toasted English muffin for the bacon and toast.[2] Craig Claiborne, in September 1967, wrote a column in The New York Times Magazine about a…

Eggs Benedict History

Posted on April 17, 2010

There are differing accounts as to the origin of eggs Benedict. In an interview in the “Talk of the Town” column of The New Yorker in 1942, the year before his death, Lemuel Benedict, a retired Wall Street stock broker, claimed that he had wandered into the Waldorf Hotel in 1894 and, hoping to find a cure for his morning hangover, ordered “buttered toast, poached eggs, crisp bacon and a hooker of hollandaise.” Oscar Tschirky, the famed maître d’hôtel, was so impressed with the dish that he put it on the breakfast and luncheon menus but substituted ham and a toasted English muffin for the bacon and toast.

Craig Claiborne, in September 1967, wrote a column in The New York Times Magazine about a letter he had received from Edward P. Montgomery, an American then residing in France. In it, Montgomery related that the dish was created by Commodore E.C. Benedict, a banker and yachtsman, who died in 1920 at the age of 86. Montgomery also included a recipe for eggs Benedict, stating that the recipe had been given to him by his mother, who had received it from her brother, who was a friend of the Commodore.

Mabel C. Butler of Vineyard Haven, Massachusetts in a November 1967 letter printed in The New York Times Magazine responded to Montgomery’s claim by correcting that the “true story, well known to the relations of Mrs. Le Grand Benedict”, of whom she was one, was:

Mr. and Mrs. Benedict, when they lived in New York around the turn of the century, dined every Saturday at Delmonico’s. One day Mrs. Benedict said to the maitre d’hotel, “Haven’t you anything new or different to suggest?” On his reply that he would like to hear something from her, she suggested poached eggs on toasted English muffins with a thin slice of ham, hollandaise sauce and a truffle on top.

Another origin of the dish is suggested in Elizabeth David’s French Provincial Cooking, where she describes a traditional French dish named œufs bénédictine, consisting of brandade (a puree of refreshed salt cod and potatoes), spread on triangles of fried bread. A poached egg is then set on top and napped with hollandaise. This story would also explain the distinctly French syntax, where the adjective follows, rather than precedes, the noun (although Oysters Rockefeller has the same syntax without needing a Romance-language origin). Still, it is not clear how this dish would have migrated to America, where it became popular. The combination of cod and eggs suggests it was a Lenten or meatless dish, and the use of salt cod suggests it could be as old as the Renaissance, when salt cod became more plentiful.

Mrs. Isabella Beeton’s Household Management had recipes in the first edition (1861) for “Dutch sauce, for benedict” (p. 405) and its variant on the following page, “Green sauce, or Hollandaise verte”, so it undoubtedly precedes the 20th century claimants above.

Oatmeal Nut Waffles

Posted on March 30, 2010

The modern waffle has its origins in the wafers—very light thin crisp cakes baked between wafer irons—of the Middle Ages. Wafer irons consisted of two metal plates connected by a hinge, with each plate connected to an arm with a wooden handle. The iron was placed over a fire and flipped to cook both sides of the wafer. The irons were used to produce a variety of different flat, unleavened cakes, usually from a mixture of barley and oats, not the white flour used today. In 14th-century England, wafers were sold by street vendors called waferers. The modern waffle is a leavened form of wafer. Medieval waffle law: In medieval Europe, vendors were permitted to sell their waffles outside of churches on saints’ days…

  

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