Posts tagged “delicious

Escargot

Posted on May 10, 2010

Escargot is a dish of cooked land snails, usually served as an appetizer. The word is also sometimes applied to the living snails of those species which are commonly eaten. Escargot, IPA: [ɛskaʁɡo], is the French word for snail. It is related to Occitan escaragol and Catalan cargol, which, in turn, may derive from a pre-Roman word *karakauseli. Not all species of snail are edible, but many are. Even among the edible species, the palatability of the flesh varies from species to species. In France, the species Helix pomatia is most often eaten. The “petit-gris” Helix aspersa is also eaten, as is Helix lucorum. Several additional species are popular in Europe; see heliciculture. Snail shells have been found in archaeological Texas, an indication that…

Quiche Lorraine

Posted on May 10, 2010

In French cuisine, a quiche (English pronunciation: /ˈkiːʃ/) is a baked dish that is based on a custard made from eggs and milk or cream in a pastry crust. Usually, the pastry shell is blind baked before the other ingredients are added for a secondary baking period. Other ingredients such as cooked chopped meat, vegetables, or cheese are often added to the egg mixture before the quiche is baked. Quiche is generally an open pie (i.e. does not contain a pastry covering), but may include an arrangement of tomato slices or pastry off-cuts for a decorative finish. Quiche is predominantly a breakfast dish, however it is acceptable to eat it for lunch or dinner. There is no one recipe known as a “breakfast quiche”…

Soufflé

Posted on May 7, 2010

A soufflé is a light, fluffy, baked cake made with egg yolks and beaten egg whites combined with various other ingredients and served as a savory main dish or sweetened as a dessert. The word soufflé is the past participle of the French verb souffler which means “to blow up” or more loosely “puff up” — an apt description of what happens to this combination of custard and egg whites. Every soufflé is made from 2 basic components: a French Creme patissiere base/flavored cream sauce or purée egg whites beaten to a soft peak meringue The base provides the flavour and the whites provide the “lift”. Foods commonly used for the base in a soufflé include jam, fruits, berries, chocolate, banana and lemon (the…

Dessert

Posted on May 7, 2010

In Western culture, Dessert is a course that typically comes at the end of a meal, usually consisting of sweet food. The word comes from the French language as dessert and this from Old French desservir, “to clear the table” and “to serve.” Common desserts include cakes, cookies, pastries, ice cream, and candies, fruit may also be eaten with the dessert. In Russia, breakfast foods such as Bliny,Oladi, and Syrniki served with honey and jam are also popular as desserts. The word dessert is most commonly used for this course in U.S., Canada, Australia, and Ireland, while sweet, pudding or afters may be alternative terms used in the UK and some other Commonwealth countries, including India. In England, the term pudding might be used…

Empanada

Posted on March 30, 2010

An empanada is a Spanish and Portuguese stuffed bread or pastry, also known as “impanada” in Italy. The name comes from the verb empanar, meaning to wrap or coat in bread. Empanada is made by folding a dough or bread patty around the stuffing. In Spain, empanadas are usually large and circular in shape and are cut into smaller portions for consumption, whereas in Portugal and South America empanadas are normally small and semi-circular (this type of empanada is commonly known as empanadilla in Spain). Empanadas are also known by a wide variety of regional names (see the entries for the individual countries below). In Spain the dish is known as Galician empanada or simply empanada, whereas in Portugal it is only known as…

Chocolate Mousse

Posted on March 30, 2010

Mousse (pronounced /ˈmus/) is derived from the French word mousse which means “lather” or “foam”. A mousse is a stable prepared food that incorporates air bubbles to give it a light and airy texture. Depending on how it is prepared, it can range from light and fluffy to creamy and thick.A dessert mousse is a form of dessert typically made from egg and cream (classically no cream, only egg yolks, egg whites, sugar, and chocolate or other flavorings), usually in combination with other flavors such as chocolate or puréed fruit, although recipes with chicken liver or other savory ingredients also exist. Once only a specialty of French restaurants, chocolate mousse entered into American and English home cuisine in the 1960s.

Chocolate and Caramel

Posted on March 29, 2010

Caramel (pronounced /ˈkærəˌmɛl/ or /ˈkɑrməl/) is a beige to dark brown confection made by heating any of a variety of sugars. It is used as a flavor in puddings and desserts, a filling in candies and chocolates, and a topping for ice cream and custards. The process of caramelization consists of heating sugar slowly to around 170 °C (340 °F). As the sugar melts, the molecules break down and re-form into compounds with a characteristic color and flavor. A variety of candies, confections, and desserts are made with caramel and its products: caramel apples, caramel with nuts (such as praline, nougat, or brittle), and caramel with custard (such as crème caramel or crème brûlée).

Lemon Chiffon Cake

Posted on March 25, 2010

Chiffon cake is considered the original filling for wedding cakes, stating in the 1800’s.

This is a delicious treat, just look at that moist goodness! I found it difficult to find the exact origins of this dish, but in both presentation and flavor, it’s tough to top. This is a sweet and moist citrus dish that makes us all glad to celebrate today’s food holiday!

Black Forest Cake

Posted on March 24, 2010

Foodimetary
Black Forest cake (American English) and Black Forest gateau (British English) are the English names for the southern German dessert Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte, correctly spelled Schwarzwälder-Kirsch-Torte (literally “Black Forest cherry liqueur torte”).

Typically, Black Forest cake consists of several layers of chocolate cake, with whipped cream and cherries between each layer. Then the cake is decorated with additional whipped cream, maraschino cherries, and chocolate shavings. In some European traditions sour cherries are used both between the layers and for decorating the top. Traditionally, Kirschwasser (a clear liquor distilled from tart cherries) is added to the cake, although other liquors are also used (such as rum, which is common in Austrian recipes). In the United States, Black Forest cake is most often prepared without alcohol.

The cake is not named after the mountain range in south-western Germany but the local specialty liquor distilled from tart cherries called Schwarzwälder Kirschwasser, or abbreviated Schwarzwälder Kirsch, the ingredient that gives the cake a special kick, due to the distinctive cherry pit flavor and the alcoholic content. In the earliest combination cherries, cream and Kirschwasser was combined probably not in the form of a cake but instead as a dessert. Cooked cherries would be served with cream and perhaps Kirschwasser. A cake combining cherries, biscuit and cream (but without Kirschwasser) probably originated in Germany. Today, the Canton of Zug is world-renowned for its Zuger Kirschtorte, a biscuit-based cake which formerly contained no Kirschwasser. A version from the Canton of Basle also exists. The confectioner Josef Keller (1887-1981) claimed having invented Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte in its present form in 1915 in the then prominent Café Agner in Bad Godesberg, now a suburb of Bonn about 500 km north of the Black Forest. This claim, however, has never been substantiated.

Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte was first mentioned in writing in 1934. At this time it was known especially in Berlin as well as at good confectioners in German, Austrian and Swiss cities. In 1949 it took 13th place in the list of best-known German cakes. From this time onwards, Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte became world-renowned.

Spanish Paella

Posted on March 24, 2010

Paella (Spanish pronunciation: [paˈeʎa]) is a Valencian rice dish that originated in its modern form in the mid-19th century near lake Albufera, a lagoon in Valencia, on the east coast of Spain. Many non-Spaniards view paella as Spain’s national dish. However, most Spaniards consider it to be a regional Valencian dish. Valencians, in turn, regard paella as one of their identity symbols. There are three widely known types of paella: Valencian paella (Spanish: paella valenciana), seafood paella (Spanish: paella de marisco) and mixed paella (Spanish: paella mixta); but there are many others as well. Valencian paella consists of white rice, green vegetables, meat (rabbit, chicken, duck), snails, beans and seasoning. Seafood paella replaces meat and snails with seafood and omits beans and green vegetables.…

Nougat

Posted on March 24, 2010

Nougat (pronounced /ˈnuːɡɪt/ NUH-gət or /ˈnuːɡɑː/ NOO-gah (Commonwealth) or /ˈnuːˌɡət/ NOO-ɡət (US)) is a term used to describe a variety of similar traditional confectioneries made with sugar or honey, roasted nuts (almonds, walnuts, pistachios, or hazelnuts are common), and sometimes chopped candied fruit. The consistency of nougat can range from chewy to hard depending on its composition, and it is used in a variety of candy bars and chocolates. There are two basic kinds of nougat: white and brown. White nougat (which appeared in Montélimar, France, in the 18th century) is made with beaten egg whites and is soft, whereas brown nougat (called nougatine in French) is made with caramelized sugar and has a firmer, often crunchy texture. In southern Europe, where it is…

Lobster Newburg

Posted on March 24, 2010

Lobster Newburg is an American seafood dish made from lobster, butter, cream, cognac, sherry, eggs and Cayenne pepper. The dish was invented by Ben Wenberg, a sea captain in the fruit trade. He demonstrated the dish at Delmonico’s Restaurant in New York City to the manager, Charles Delmonico, in 1876. After refinements by the chef, Charles Ranhofer, the creation was added to the restaurant’s menu as Lobster à la Wenberg and it soon became very popular. An argument between Wenberg and Charles Delmonico caused the dish to be removed from the menu. To satisfy patrons’ continued requests for it, the name was rendered in anagram Lobster à la Newburg or Lobster Newburg. It is still quite popular and is found in French cookbooks, where…

  

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