Posts tagged “delicious

Chocolate and Caramel

Posted on March 29, 2010

Caramel (pronounced /ˈkærəˌmɛl/ or /ˈkɑrməl/) is a beige to dark brown confection made by heating any of a variety of sugars. It is used as a flavor in puddings and desserts, a filling in candies and chocolates, and a topping for ice cream and custards. The process of caramelization consists of heating sugar slowly to around 170 °C (340 °F). As the sugar melts, the molecules break down and re-form into compounds with a characteristic color and flavor. A variety of candies, confections, and desserts are made with caramel and its products: caramel apples, caramel with nuts (such as praline, nougat, or brittle), and caramel with custard (such as crème caramel or crème brûlée).

Lemon Chiffon Cake

Posted on March 25, 2010

Chiffon cake is considered the original filling for wedding cakes, stating in the 1800’s.

This is a delicious treat, just look at that moist goodness! I found it difficult to find the exact origins of this dish, but in both presentation and flavor, it’s tough to top. This is a sweet and moist citrus dish that makes us all glad to celebrate today’s food holiday!

Black Forest Cake

Posted on March 24, 2010

Foodimetary
Black Forest cake (American English) and Black Forest gateau (British English) are the English names for the southern German dessert Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte, correctly spelled Schwarzwälder-Kirsch-Torte (literally “Black Forest cherry liqueur torte”).

Typically, Black Forest cake consists of several layers of chocolate cake, with whipped cream and cherries between each layer. Then the cake is decorated with additional whipped cream, maraschino cherries, and chocolate shavings. In some European traditions sour cherries are used both between the layers and for decorating the top. Traditionally, Kirschwasser (a clear liquor distilled from tart cherries) is added to the cake, although other liquors are also used (such as rum, which is common in Austrian recipes). In the United States, Black Forest cake is most often prepared without alcohol.

The cake is not named after the mountain range in south-western Germany but the local specialty liquor distilled from tart cherries called Schwarzwälder Kirschwasser, or abbreviated Schwarzwälder Kirsch, the ingredient that gives the cake a special kick, due to the distinctive cherry pit flavor and the alcoholic content. In the earliest combination cherries, cream and Kirschwasser was combined probably not in the form of a cake but instead as a dessert. Cooked cherries would be served with cream and perhaps Kirschwasser. A cake combining cherries, biscuit and cream (but without Kirschwasser) probably originated in Germany. Today, the Canton of Zug is world-renowned for its Zuger Kirschtorte, a biscuit-based cake which formerly contained no Kirschwasser. A version from the Canton of Basle also exists. The confectioner Josef Keller (1887-1981) claimed having invented Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte in its present form in 1915 in the then prominent Café Agner in Bad Godesberg, now a suburb of Bonn about 500 km north of the Black Forest. This claim, however, has never been substantiated.

Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte was first mentioned in writing in 1934. At this time it was known especially in Berlin as well as at good confectioners in German, Austrian and Swiss cities. In 1949 it took 13th place in the list of best-known German cakes. From this time onwards, Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte became world-renowned.

Spanish Paella

Posted on March 24, 2010

Paella (Spanish pronunciation: [paˈeʎa]) is a Valencian rice dish that originated in its modern form in the mid-19th century near lake Albufera, a lagoon in Valencia, on the east coast of Spain. Many non-Spaniards view paella as Spain’s national dish. However, most Spaniards consider it to be a regional Valencian dish. Valencians, in turn, regard paella as one of their identity symbols. There are three widely known types of paella: Valencian paella (Spanish: paella valenciana), seafood paella (Spanish: paella de marisco) and mixed paella (Spanish: paella mixta); but there are many others as well. Valencian paella consists of white rice, green vegetables, meat (rabbit, chicken, duck), snails, beans and seasoning. Seafood paella replaces meat and snails with seafood and omits beans and green vegetables.…

Nougat

Posted on March 24, 2010

Nougat (pronounced /ˈnuːɡɪt/ NUH-gət or /ˈnuːɡɑː/ NOO-gah (Commonwealth) or /ˈnuːˌɡət/ NOO-ɡət (US)) is a term used to describe a variety of similar traditional confectioneries made with sugar or honey, roasted nuts (almonds, walnuts, pistachios, or hazelnuts are common), and sometimes chopped candied fruit. The consistency of nougat can range from chewy to hard depending on its composition, and it is used in a variety of candy bars and chocolates. There are two basic kinds of nougat: white and brown. White nougat (which appeared in Montélimar, France, in the 18th century) is made with beaten egg whites and is soft, whereas brown nougat (called nougatine in French) is made with caramelized sugar and has a firmer, often crunchy texture. In southern Europe, where it is…

Lobster Newburg

Posted on March 24, 2010

Lobster Newburg is an American seafood dish made from lobster, butter, cream, cognac, sherry, eggs and Cayenne pepper. The dish was invented by Ben Wenberg, a sea captain in the fruit trade. He demonstrated the dish at Delmonico’s Restaurant in New York City to the manager, Charles Delmonico, in 1876. After refinements by the chef, Charles Ranhofer, the creation was added to the restaurant’s menu as Lobster à la Wenberg and it soon became very popular. An argument between Wenberg and Charles Delmonico caused the dish to be removed from the menu. To satisfy patrons’ continued requests for it, the name was rendered in anagram Lobster à la Newburg or Lobster Newburg. It is still quite popular and is found in French cookbooks, where…

%d bloggers like this: