Posts tagged “dinner

Enchilada

Posted on May 3, 2010

An enchilada (pronounced /ˌɛntʃɨˈlɑːdə/) is a corn tortilla rolled around a filling and covered with a chili pepper sauce. Enchiladas can be filled with a variety of ingredients, including meat, cheese, beans, potatoes, vegetables, seafood or combinations.Enchiladas originated in Mexico. The people living in the lake region of the Valley of Mexico traditionally ate corn tortillas folded or rolled around small fish. Writing at the time of the Spanish conquistadors, Bernal Díaz del Castillo documented a feast enjoyed by Europeans hosted by Hernán Cortés in Coyoacán, which included foods served in corn tortillas. (Note that the native Nahuatl name for the flat corn bread used was tlaxcalli; the Spanish give it the name tortilla.)[4][5][6][7] In the nineteenth century, as Mexican cuisine was being memorialized,…

Scampi

Posted on April 30, 2010

Scampi is a culinary name for some species of lobster, notably the ‘true’ scampi Nephrops norvegicus, and is also used as a name for a style of preparation of these lobsters and other seafood. In both the United Kingdom and the USA, the word has come to define the method of preparation rather than the ingredient, although referring to quite different methods in the two countries. In the United Kingdom, “scampi” refers to a dish of shelled lobster tail meat, that commonly comes prepared coated in breadcrumbs or batter, deep fried, and often served with chips, peas and Tartar sauce.[3] In the Southern Hemisphere, other species of lobster are used instead, such as Metanephrops challengeri. In the USA, “scampi” is often the menu name…

Rib Roast

Posted on April 30, 2010

A standing rib roast is a cut of beef from the rib section, which is one of the eight primal cuts of beef. The entire rib section comprises ribs six through twelve of the animal; a standing rib roast can comprise anywhere from two to seven ribs. It is given the name “standing” because it is most often roasted in a standing position, that is, with the ribs stacked vertically and the vertebral processes on the bottom. An alternative is to cook with the rib bones on the bottom and the vertebral processes removed for easier carving. A standing rib roast, if sliced when uncooked, would yield a number of rib steaks. Rib eye steaks result from removing the bones and most of the fat and lesser muscles (tail).

A colloquial and popular term for this cut is “prime rib”. Historically, this name stands out regardless of the grade. In addition, the USDA acknowledges this historical note by not requiring the cut “to be derived from USDA prime grade beef”.[1] The technical name, per URMIS (Uniform Retail Meat Industry Standards), is “Beef Rib Roast”.[2]

A slice of standing rib roast will include portions of the so-called “eye” of the rib as well as the outer, fat-marbled muscle (spinalis dorsali) known as the “lip” or “cap”.

The traditional preparation for a standing rib roast is to rub the outside of the roast with salt and seasonings and slow-roast with dry heat. In the United States, it is common for barbecue purists to apply smoke to the uncooked rib roast at low heat for 2-3 hours before dry roasting.

In the United Kingdom, Yorkshire pudding is frequently served as a side dish with prime rib. In many restaurants specializing in prime rib, several entire roasts (of varying degrees of doneness) will be placed on a large, heated cart, and carved at tableside. This style of service can be found throughout the Lawry’s chain, Morton’s of Chicago, as well as at independent establishments such as San Francisco’s House of Prime Rib.

In the United States, the standing rib roast has NAMP classifications 109 through 112D.[3]

Fondue

Posted on April 13, 2010

Fondue is a Swiss communal dish shared at the table in an earthenware pot (caquelon) over a small burner (rechaud). The term is derived from the French verb fondre (to melt), in the past participle fondu (melted). Diners use forks to dip bits of food (most often bread) into the warm semi-liquid sauce (commonly a cheese mix). Heat is supplied by a wick or gel alcohol burner, or a tealight. While cheese fondue is the most widely known, there are other pot and dipping ingredients. A recipe for a sauce made from Pramnos wine, grated goat’s cheese and white flour appears in Scroll 11 (lines 629-645) of Homer’s Iliad and has been cited as the earliest record of a fondue. Modern fondue originated during…

Empanada

Posted on March 30, 2010

An empanada is a Spanish and Portuguese stuffed bread or pastry, also known as “impanada” in Italy. The name comes from the verb empanar, meaning to wrap or coat in bread. Empanada is made by folding a dough or bread patty around the stuffing. In Spain, empanadas are usually large and circular in shape and are cut into smaller portions for consumption, whereas in Portugal and South America empanadas are normally small and semi-circular (this type of empanada is commonly known as empanadilla in Spain). Empanadas are also known by a wide variety of regional names (see the entries for the individual countries below). In Spain the dish is known as Galician empanada or simply empanada, whereas in Portugal it is only known as…

Baked Scallops

Posted on March 26, 2010

With many varieties to scallop preparation, the selection of the type of scallop may be the most significant step you make in choosing to prepare a meal with this highly regarding seafood. Understanding the structure and development of scallops, the difference between the two major types; bay and sea, and identifying levels of freshness will prepare you to become the seafood culinary expert. Scallops have been highly regarded as not only a culinary treat but also as a significant piece of decore. With beautiful shells, the scallop is a bi-valve mollusk which uses an oversized adductor muscle to open and close. It is this muscle, within the shell, that we routinely consume in the United States. Baked scallops are a favorite treat of people…

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