Posts tagged “food holidays book

October 21st is National Pumpkin Cheesecake Day!

Posted on October 21, 2018

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Here are today’s five thing to know about Cheesecake:

  1. Pennsylvania Dutch-style cheesecake uses a slightly tangy type of cheese with larger curds and less water content, called pot or farmer’s cheese.
  2. Philadelphia-style cheesecake is lighter in texture, yet richer in flavor than New York style cheesecake.
  3. Farmer’s cheese cheesecake is the contemporary implementation for the traditional use of baking to preserve fresh cheese and is often baked in a cake form along with fresh fruit like a tart.
  4. Country-style cheesecake uses buttermilk to produce a firm texture while decreasing the pH (increasing acidity) to extend shelf life.
  5. Lactose free cheesecake may be made either with lactose-free cream cheese or as an imitation using Vegan recipes combining non-dairy cream cheese alternatives with other lactose-free ingredient

Today’s Food History

  • 1422 Charles VI of France died. It was during Charles VI rule that Taillevent was made Master of the King’s kitchens. Charles VI also gave sole rights for the aging of Roquefort cheese to the village of Roquefort-sur-Soulzon, and all Roquefort must still be aged in the caves there today.
  • 1449 George Plantagenet, duke of Clarence was born. Brother of Edward IV whom he was accused of plotting against. He was thrown into prison and secretly executed in the Tower of London. The rumor is that he was drowned in a butt (large cask) of malmsey wine.
  • 1879 Thomas Edison demonstrated the first commercially practical light bulb at his laboratory in Menlo Park, New Jersey.
  • 1990 Tom Carvel died. He was the inventor of the soft-serve ice cream machine, and founder of the Carvel ice cream chain.

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October 20th is National Eggo Day! / #NationalEggoDay #StrangerThings

Posted on October 20, 2018

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Five Food facts about Eggos:

  1. Eggo waffles were invented  by three brothers: Tony, Sam, and Frank Dorsa.
  2. They were initially introduced as “Froffles,” but the name “Eggos” became popular due to their eggy taste.
  3. The Dorsa brothers also produced a line of Eggo potato chips.
  4. It wasn’t until 1968 when Kellog acquired the brand that the slogan “L’eggo my Eggo” was coined.
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5. “Oh. Candy… leftovers… eggos… she really likes eggos.” – Mike, Stranger Things



Today’s Food History

  • 1880 Lydia Maria Francis Child died. An American abolitionist and author of novels and children’s books. She also wrote books of advice for women including ‘The Frugal Housewife’ (1829).
  • 1882 Bela Lugosi was born. Dracula.
  • 1970 Norman Borlaug received the Nobel Peace Prize for his contribution to the ‘Green Revolution.’ He had developed new varieties of wheat and rice to help increase food production in the Third World

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October 19th is National Seafood Bisque Day!

Posted on October 19, 2018

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Here are today’s five thing to know about Seafood Bisque:

  1.  Bisque is a smooth, creamy, highly seasoned soup of French origin, classically based on a strained broth of crustaceans.
  2. It can be made from lobster, crab, shrimp or crayfish.
  3. It is thought the name is derived from Biscay, as in Bay of Biscay, but the crustaceans are certainly bis cuites“twice cooked” (by analogy to abiscuit) for they are first sautéed lightly in their shells, then simmered in wine and aromatic ingredients, before being strained, followed by the addition of cream.
  4. Bisque is a method of extracting every bit of flavor from imperfect crustaceans not good enough to send to market. In an authentic bisque, the shells are ground to a fine paste and added to thicken the soup.
  5.  Bisque is also sometimes used to refer to cream-based soups that do not contain seafood, in which the sometimes pre-cooked ingredients are pureed or processed in a food processor or a food mill.

Today’s Food History

  • 1688 William Cheselden was born. An English surgeon and teacher, he was one of the first to describe the role of saliva in digestion.
  • 1917 In France, Salvation Army volunteer Helen Purviance made the first doughnuts for homesick U.S. soldiers. The doughnuts became a symbol of the spirit of the Salvation Army’s work to ease the hardship of WW I soldiers on the frontline.
  • 1937 ‘Woman’s Day’ magazine began publishing.
  • 1962 Boxer Evander Holyfield was born. On June 28, 1997, Mike Tyson bit off a chunk of Evander Holyfield’s ear in the 3rd round of a boxing match. Tyson was disqualified.

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October 18th is National Chocolate Cupcake Day

Posted on October 18, 2018

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Today’s Cupcake Trivia

Cupcakes were originally baked in teacups, hence the name Cup-cake


Here are today’s five thing to know about Cupcake:

  1.  Cupcake liners do more than make it easy to remove them from the pan. Traditionally, sides of tins are greased for easy removal, but also floured because the batter needs to have something to cling to. A cupcake liner takes care of both.
  2. On August 15, 2009 GourmetGiftBaskets.com broke the world record for largest cupcake ever made. The cupcake was 1,224 pounds, 4 foot tall by 10 foot wide, and had 2 million calories.
  3. One of the most popular cupcake bakery’s in the U.S. is Crumbs in New York City. They have reported $23.5 million in cupcake revenue last year alone!
  4. The first mention of a cupcake recipe goes as far back as 1796. Amelia Simms wrote a recipe in “American Cookery” which referenced, “a cake to be baked in small cups”.
  5.  However, it wasn’t until 1828 that the actual word cupcake was used by Eliza Leslie in her cookbook “Seventy-five Receipts for Pastry, Cakes, and Sweetmeats”.

The complete list of

October Food Holidays


 Today’s Food History

  • 1753 Jean Jacques Regis de Cambaceres was born. A French politician and gourmet. A gastronomic contemporary and rival of Talleyrand and Carême. The dinners he gave were famous, and Cambaceres closely supervised the food preparation. He refused to admit late-comers, and was also said to have demanded complete silence while dining.
  • 1871 Charles Babbage died. He invented the adding machine, and among his other inventions is the cowcatcher, the V shaped front end on locomotives.
  • 1878 Thomas Edison made electricity available for household usage.
  • 1892 The first long distance telephone line between Chicago and New York City was put in service.
  • 1919 William Waldorf Astor Born. William Waldorf Astor was a cousin of John Jacob Astor IV, the great grandson of John Jacob Astor. He built the Waldorf section (1893) of what would become the Waldorf Astoria (1897). The Empire State Building (1929) now stands on the site.
  • 1931 Thomas Alva Edison, “the wizard of Menlo Park” died.
  • 1945 James T. Ehler, Chef and food writer, was born. 
  • 1969 Cyclamate, a non-caloric sweetener, was banned. Discovered in 1937, and widely used in the food industry, cyclamate was found to cause cancer in laboratory rats. Cyclamate is still used in many countries around the world.

 


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October 17th is National Pasta Day! / #NationalPastaDay

Posted on October 17, 2018

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Pasta Fact:

It is said that Thomas Jefferson introduced pasta to the US around 1789


Here are today’s five thing to know about Pasta:

  1. The average American consumes 20 lbs. of pasta annually. This makes it the 6th highest food per capita in the country.
  2. As of March 2012, the average price an American pays for pasta is $1.45 per pound! This makes it one of the most affordable meals.
  3. 24% of the global consumption of pasta is by Americans – the largest of any country in the world. Americans consume 6 billion pounds of pasta each year.
  4. The United States produces 4.4 billion pounds of pasta annually, making it the second largest pasta-producing nation.
  5. Pasta made its way to the New World through the English, who discovered it while touring Italy. Colonists brought to America the English practice of cooking noodles at least one half hour, then smothering them with cream sauce and cheese.

Today’s Food History

  • 1946 Jim Tucker of the music group ‘The Turtles’ was born.
  • 1963 ‘Sugar Shack’ by Jimmy Gilmer & Fireballs is #1 on the charts
  • 1977 The Guinness Book of World Records notes that Peter Dowdeswell managed to eat 40 sandwiches in 17 minutes, 53.9 seconds at a California donut shop on October 17, 1977. Each sandwich was 6 X 3 inches, spread with jam and butter.

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October 16th is World Food Day! / #WorldFoodDay

Posted on October 16, 2018

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Celebrate & Remember

‘If more of us valued foodand cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world.’

J. R. R. Tolkien


Here are today’s five things to know about World Food Day:

  1. Hunger kills more people every year than malaria, tuberculosis, and AIDS combined.
  2. About one billion people in developing countries live in extreme poverty. Seventy-eight percent of them live in rural areas, where agriculture is the main driving force of the rural economy and, in some cases, of the whole economy.
  3. 60% of the hungry in the world are women.
  4. Almost 5 million children under the age of 5 die of malnutrition-related causes every year.
  5. In the USA, 30-40% of the food supply is wasted, equaling more than 20 pounds of food per person per month

If you want to read more about the Think.Eat.Save food waste campaign, follow this link and get involved!


Today’s Food History

  • 1829 The Tremont Hotel opened in Boston. It was the first modern hotel in the U.S. Rooms were $2 per day with meals included.
  • 1939 ‘The Man Who Came to Dinner’ opened on Broadway.
  • 1945 World Food Day. The founding day of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization.
  • 1962 ‘Flea’ (Michael Peter Balzary) was born.  Bass player for the music group ‘Red Hot Chili Peppers.’
  • 1986 The largest northern pike weighed over 55 pounds and was caught in Germany.

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October 15th is Red Wine Day! / #RedWineDay #NationalRedWineDay

Posted on October 15, 2018

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Did you know?

One bottle of wine contains the juice of about 3 pounds of grapes


Here are today’s five thing to know about red wine:

  1. The top three imported wines sold in the U.S. are Yellowtail (Australia), Cavit (Italy), and Concha y Toro (Chile).
  2. The term bouquet refers to the total scent of the wine. Aroma is the scent of the grapes. When wine tasters want to describe the bouquet and the aroma together, they use the term nose.
  3. In 2008, the top five wine-producing states in the U.S. were California (3.4 million tons of grapes crushed for wine), Washington (145,000 tons), New York (45,000 tons), Oregon (40,000 tons), and Pennsylvania (13,200 tons).
  4. According to the U.S. Dietary Guidelines, there are 100 calories in a 5-ounce glass of wine (compared to 150 calories in a 12-ounce beer).
  5. The ancient Greeks had a wine glass to ensure the drinker’s moderation. If wine was poured above a certain level, the cup spilled its entire contents out of the bottom.

Today’s Food History

  • 1944 Don Stevenson of the music group ‘Moby Grape’ was born.
  • 1959 Emeril Lagasse was born in Fall River, Massachusetts. TV cook and actor.
  • 1988 ‘Red Red Wine’ by UB40 hits number 1 on the charts.
  • 1990 Killer bees reach the U.S. in the city of Hidalgo in southern Texas.
  • 1996 Pierre Franey died. A French chef who became famous as the chef of ‘Le Pavillon’ restaurant in New York City from 1945 to 1960. He published several cookbooks and collaborated with Craig Claiborne on the New York Times food column, ‘The 60 Minute Gourmet’.
  • 2002 Konrad (Emil) Bloch died. Nobel prize winner for his work on cholesterol and fatty acids. He discovered that high levels of cholesterol may lead ultimately to increased risk of heart attacks.

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