Posts tagged “guinness book of world records

National Potato Day

Posted on October 27, 2013

National Potato Day

Wild Foods Day

American Beer Day

Five Food Finds about Potatoes

  • Despite being delicious fried, baked, or boiled, the root vegetable rarely gets the praise it deserves. The environmentally friendly food crop has played a huge role in our development, but rarely do we give our starchy friend a second thought.
  • They’re cheap and ridiculously easy to grow, and don’t require massive amounts of fertilizer and chemical additives to thrive (although some growers still use them anyway). They’re also super cheap and good for you, providing you’re not eating them in fried form all the time.
  • In 1995, potato plants were taken into space with the space shuttle Columbia. This marked the first time any food was ever grown in space.
  • The world’s largest potato weighed in at 18 pounds, 4 ounces according to the Guinness Book of World Records.
  • While potatoes may be synonymous with the Irish these days, they were grown in the Andes mountains centuries before Europeans ever set foot in the new world.

Today’s Food History

1728 Captain James Cook was born. British explorer who charted and named many Pacific Islands, including the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii).

1806 Alphonse Pyrame de Candolle was born. A Swiss botanist, author of ‘Origin of Cultivated Plants.’

1872 Emily Post was born. (or on October 3, 1873). Etiquette expert, newspaper columnist, author of ‘Etiquette in Society, in Business, in Politics, and at Home’ (1922); ‘The Emily Post Cook Book’ (1949); ‘Motor Manners’ (1950).

1873 Joseph F. Glidden applied for a patent for barbed wire.

1904 The first subway (underground) rail system in New York City began operating.  The Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT) line was 21 miles long.

1930 ‘Gorgonzola’ was recorded by Jack Hylton & His Orchestra with Leslie Sarony

1975 Rex Stout, American crime writer died. More than 70 of his novels and stories feature the fictional gourmand/gourmet detective, Nero Wolfe. Archie Goodwin, the detective’s assistant, described him as weighing “one seventh of a ton” (about 286 pounds). Shad Roe and Duck were two of Wolfe’s favorites, and he also consumed copious amounts of beer. Stout also published ‘The Nero Wolfe Cookbook’ in 1973.

National Vanilla Milkshake Day

Posted on June 20, 2013

National Vanilla Milkshake Day

Five Food Finds about Milkshakes

  • The first known printed reference to a “milkshake” dates back to 1885 and contains whiskey as one ingredient. For medicinal purposes only.
  • Milkshakes got their name from being served in bars. If the customer enjoyed the milkshake, he shook hands with the bartender. If not, the bartender didn’t get a tip.
  • According to The Guinness Book of World Records, in 2000 Ira Freehof (owner of Comfort Diners), (with a lot of help from Parmalot USA and The American Dairy Association), made the world’s largest milkshake. At 6,000 gallons it was the equivalent of 50,000 normal-sized shakes. Do you want fries with that? (Please say no, you don’t need anything else to eat or drink after that, especially not fatty fries.)
  • Malted milk powder was invented in 1897 by James and William Horlick, but it was Ivar Coulson, a soda jerk for a Walgreen’s drug store, who first added it to milkshakes in 1922. This created the malted milkshake or just plain “malt.”
  • Steven Poplawski invented the electric blender in 1922 just for milkshakes. Before that, the effort of shaking them up must have required a lot of upper body motion.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1861 Sir Frederick Gowland Hopkins was born. He discovered what we now call ‘vitamins,’ essential nutrients needed to maintain health.

1948 The TV show ‘Toast of the Town’ premiers on CBS with Ed Sullivan as the host.

1964 ‘Chapel of Love’ by Dixie Cups is #1 on the charts

1977 The trans-Alaska oil pipeline opened. It takes oil 38 days to travel 800 miles from the fields in Prudhoe Bay to the port of Valdez.

  

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