Posts tagged “historical

A History of Frozen Food

Posted on March 7, 2014

Clarence Birdseye invented, developed, and commercialized a method for quick-freezing food products in convenient packages and without altering the original taste. “Frosted foods” were sold to the public for the first time in 1930 in Springfield, Massachusetts, under the tradename Birds Eye Frosted Foods®. While Clarence Birdseye has become a household name, his process has evolved into a multi-billion dollar industry.

Fruits and vegetables chosen for fresh produces isles are usually picked before they ripen, which gives them less time to reach higher amounts of vitamins and minerals. The appearance of ‘ripening’ still occurs, but this produce will never have the same nutritive value as if they had been allowed to fully ripen on the plant.

Clarence Birdseye was born in 1886 in Brooklyn, New York A taxidermist by trade, but a chef at heart, Clarence Birdseye wished his family could have fresh food all year. After observing the people of the Arctic preserving fresh fish and meat in barrels of sea water quickly frozen by the arctic temperatures, he concluded that it was the rapid freezing in the extremely low temperatures that made food retain freshness when thawed and cooked months later.

In 1923, with an investment of $7 for an electric fan, buckets of brine, and cakes of ice, Clarence Birdseye invented and later perfected a system of packing fresh food into waxed cardboard boxes and flash-freezing under high pressure.  The Goldman-Sachs Trading Corporation and the Postum Company (later the General Foods Corporation) bought Clarence Birdseye’s patents and trademarks in 1929 for $22 million. The first quick-frozen vegetables, fruits, seafoods, and meat.

Clarence Birdseye turned his attention to other interests and invented an infrared heat lamp, a spotlight for store window displays, a harpoon for marking whales, then established companies to market his products.

Nutritional Five Food Finds about Frozen Food

  • Fruits and vegetables tend to be frozen at their peak ripeness, a time when they have the most nutrients.
  • Pumpkins and tomatoes lose little nutritional value during the freezing process.
  • When shopping for frozen foods, choose those marked with the USDA ‘U.S. Fancy’ shield.  Vegetables of this standard tend to be more nutrient-rich than the lower grades ‘U.S. No. 1’ or ‘U.S. No. 2.’
  • Steaming or microwaving (instead of boiling) frozen foods minimizes the loss of vitamins & nutrients.
  • Frozen produce sales have climbed faster than fresh produce sales over the past five years.

 

Udon noodles, eaten by billions every day

Posted on March 30, 2012

Did you know that a Buddhist priest was the first one to bring Udon noodles from China?  Kūkai, a Buddhist priest, traveled to China around the beginning of the 9th century to study. Sanuki Province claimed to have been the first to adopt udon from Kūkai. Enni, a Rinzai monk, went to China in the 13th century; Hakata claimed to have produced udon based on Enni’s recipe. Udon is usually served hot as noodle soup in its simplest form as kake udon, in a mildly flavoured broth called kakejiru which is made of dashi, soy sauce (shōyu), and mirin. It is usually topped with thinly chopped scallions. Other common toppings include tempura, often prawn or kakiage (a type of mixed tempura fritter), or abura…

A Legend is Born: Coca Cola Founder’s Day

Posted on March 29, 2012

Did you know that Coca Cola comes from the use of coca and kola?  Originally intended as a patent medicine when it was invented in the late 19th century by (Doc) John Pemberton, Coca-Cola was bought out by businessman Asa Griggs Candler, whose marketing tactics led Coke to its dominance of the world soft-drink market throughout the 20th century. Food Finds for Coca Cola Coca Cola was first invented by a pharmacist name John Pemberton as a medicine to cure headaches. Coca-Cola is called “Coca-Cola” because of the original ingredients used in the medicine, Coca leaves and Kola seeds. Wine was also added in place of sugar similar to the coke we drink today. When Mentos is added to Coca-Cola, the carbon dioxide in the…

A History of Duncan Hines

Posted on March 28, 2012

Did you know that Duncan Hines was a man before he was a brand?  He was an American pioneer of restaurant ratings for travelers, best known today for the brand of food products that bears his name. Hines was born in Bowling Green, Kentucky. Working as a traveling salesman for a Chicago printer, by age 55 in 1935, Hines had eaten a lot of good and bad meals on the road all across the US. At this time in the United States, there was no interstate highway system and only a few chain restaurants, except for those in large, populated areas. Therefore, travelers depended on getting a good meal at a local restaurant. Hines and his wife, Florence, began assembling a list for friends of…

A History of the Paella

Posted on March 27, 2012

Did you know?  Many non-Spaniards view paella as Spain’s national dish, but most Spaniards consider it to be a regional Valencian dish. Valencians, in turn, regard paella as one of their identifying symbols. On special occasions, 18th century Valencians used paelleras to cook rice in the open air of their orchards near lake Albufera. Water vole meat was one of the main ingredients of early paellas, along with eel and butter beans. Novelist Vicente Blasco Ibáñez described the Valencian custom of eating water voles in Cañas y Barro (1902), a realistic novel about life among the fishermen and peasants near lake Albufera. Living standards rose with the sociological changes of the late 19th century in Spain, giving rise to reunions and outings in the…

A History of Aunt Jemima

Posted on March 25, 2012

Aunt Jemima’s pancake mix was one of the first “mixes” ever sold (from the R.T. Davis Milling Company). Former slave Nancy Green was hired as a spokesperson for the Aunt Jemima pancake mix in 1890. Green  played the Jemima character from 1890 until 1923. The world first “discovered” the real Aunt Jemima (Green)  at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, 1893, where she would make pancakes. Today, most of us know her from the kindly portrait on the label of the American iconic syrup and mixes.

Five Food Finds about Aunt Jemima

  • Most people think of the Aunt Jemima brand as a syrup, but it actually wasn’t introduced as a syrup until 1966.
  • Some view Aunt Jemima as a negative racial stereotype.  Throughout the years, the brand has done some work to create a more empowering image of her.
  • Aunt Jemima’s pancake mix was one of the first “mixes” ever sold.
  • At the World’s Columbian Exposition, Aunt Jemima’ (Nancy Green) demonstrated how to use the new mix.  The exhibit was so popular, police had to control the crowds at the Aunt Jemima booth.
  • Aunt Jemima was the first pancake mix available, and it continues to be one of the best-selling in the world.

 

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