Posts tagged “international

A History of the Paella

Posted on March 27, 2012

Did you know?  Many non-Spaniards view paella as Spain’s national dish, but most Spaniards consider it to be a regional Valencian dish. Valencians, in turn, regard paella as one of their identifying symbols. On special occasions, 18th century Valencians used paelleras to cook rice in the open air of their orchards near lake Albufera. Water vole meat was one of the main ingredients of early paellas, along with eel and butter beans. Novelist Vicente Blasco Ibáñez described the Valencian custom of eating water voles in Cañas y Barro (1902), a realistic novel about life among the fishermen and peasants near lake Albufera. Living standards rose with the sociological changes of the late 19th century in Spain, giving rise to reunions and outings in the…

March 21 – National French Bread Day

Posted on March 21, 2012

National French Bread Day

also:

National California Strawberry Day

Five Food Finds about French Bread

  • French national law dictates that ‘French’ bread should contain only combinations of flour, yeast, salt and water.
  • French bread is a simple low-fat white flour bread, which is baked into long slender loaves called baguettes.
  • Most baguettes are around 2-3’ in length, and 3-5” in thickness.
  • While a regular baguette is made with a direct addition of baker’s yeast, it is not unusual for artisan-style loaves to be made with a poolish, “biga” or other bread pre-ferments to increase flavor complexity and other characteristics.
  • Outside France, baguettes are also made with other doughs; for example, the Vietnamese bánh mì uses a high proportion of rice flour, while many North American bakeries make whole wheat, multigrain, and sourdough baguettes alongside French-style loaves.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1925 Teaching the theory of evolution became illegal in Tennessee.

1984 A section of Central Park is renamed ‘Strawberry Fields’ to honor John Lennon.

1994 Due to bad harvests, there is a shortage of Japanese grown rice.  Japan’s Imperial Palace begins serving royal meals to the Emperor & Empress with rice grown in the U.S., China and Thailand.

1999 Bertrand Piccard and Brian Jones landed in the Egyptian desert, having completed the 1st ‘Around the World’ hot air balloon flight.  According to the BBC, they carried fresh food, including bread, cheese and pre-cooked steaks to last for 6 or 7 days, after which they made due with dried foods such as cereals and powdered milk.  The flight began in the Swiss Alps, took 19 days, 21 hours and 55 minutes, and covered 29,056 non-stop miles.

A History of the Baguette

Posted on March 21, 2012

The word itself was not used to refer to a type of bread until apparently 1920, but what is now known as “baguette” may have existed well before that. Though the baguette today is often considered one of the symbols of French culture viewed from abroad, the association of France with long loaves predates any mention of it. Long, if wide, loaves had been made since the time of Louis XIV, long thin ones since the mid-eighteenth century and in fact by the nineteenth century some were far longer than the baguette: “loaves of bread six feet long that look like crowbars!” (1862); “Housemaids were hurrying homewards with their purchases for various Gallic breakfasts, and the long sticks of bread, a yard or two…

A History of Taco Bell

Posted on March 21, 2012

Everyone’s probably  eaten at Taco Bell, but did you know the “Bell” came from the founder’s name, Glenn Bell?  He pioneered the sale of crunchy tacos to the world over 50 years ago.  The first Taco Bell opened March 21, 1962. Taco Bell Begins Glenn, a 23-year-old former Marine, arrived in San Bernadino, California, just after World War II.  He opened a one man hot dog stand, but was interested in mexican food.  He wanted a quick way to grab Mexican food on the go. He first started selling hot dogs paired with a sauce that would later become Taco Bell’s hot sauce.  Soon, he experimented with ways to prepare tacos quickly and efficiently. He also had the novel idea of frying the taco…

March 20 – National Ravioli Day

Posted on March 20, 2012

National Ravioli Day

Five Food Finds about Ravioli

  • The first mentions of Ravioli was in the 14th century Venus.
  • The word ravioli is from an old Italian word riavvolgere (“to wrap”)
  • Canned ravioli was pioneered by Chef Boyardee in the 1930’s
  • “Fresh” packed ravioli lasts up for several week while fresh made lasts for just a few days.
  •  Italian tradition  is to serve vegetarian ravioli, particularly on Fridays. Meats is served as a side or later in the meal.

Daily Quote

“No man is lonely eating spaghetti; it requires so much attention.”

Christopher Morley

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1602 The Dutch East India Company was established and the Netherlands granted it a monopoly on trade with Asia.

1727  RIP Sir Isaac Newton It is said that an apple fell on his head inspired his theory of universal gravitation.  The apple is thought to have been the green skinned ‘Flower of Kent’ variety.

1932 RIP Ilya Ivanovich Ivanov,a Soviet biologist.  Others had previously shown it was possible to artificially inseminate domestic animals, Ivanov developed the practical procedures in 1901.

1941 ‘All That Meat And No Potatoes’ was recorded by jazz musician Fats Waller.

Mexican Coke

Posted on March 2, 2012

Across the South grocery stores are introducing a Mexican product that is reaching cult status. A product as American as well… Coca-Cola.  Only this time more “authentic” than the ones you can buy in your local corner mart or vending machine.  Mexican Coke’s main appeal is not only the old fashioned bottle and logo but, it’s use of real sugar as a primary sweetener. Since the early 1980’s most American colas changed their primary sweetener from cane sugar to high fructose corn syrup.  This move was in part to save money as well as insure a longer more stable shelf life. Seems there is a growing segment of the population is now calling out for “old glory” in the form of a Mexican bottle…

  

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