Posts tagged “john gorrie

National Fudge Day

Posted on June 16, 2013

National Fudge Day

Five Food Finds about Fudge

  • Fudge is a type of Western confectionery which is usually very sweet, and extremely rich. It is made by mixing sugar, butter, and milk and heating it to the soft-ball stage at 240 °F (116 °C), and then beating the mixture while it cools so that it acquires a smooth, creamy consistency. Many variations with other flavourings added are possible.
  • The components of fudge are very similar to the traditional recipe for tablet, which is noted in The Household Book of Lady Grisell Baillie (1692-1733). The term “fudge” is often used in the United Kingdom for a softer variant of the tablet recipe.
  • American-style fudge (containing chocolate) is found in a letter written by Emelyn Battersby Hartridge, a student at Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, New York.
  • Word of this popular confectionery spread to other women’s colleges.
  • Hot fudge in the United States and Canada is usually considered to be a chocolate product often used as a topping for ice cream in a heated form, particularly sundaes and parfaits.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1794 The first stone was laid for the world’s largest grain windmill in Holland. Known as ‘De Walvisch’ (the whale), it is still in existence.

1855 R.I.P. John Gorrie. Gorrie was received the first U.S. patent for mechanical refrigeration in 1851.

1893 R.W. Rueckheim invents ‘Cracker Jack’, a popcorn, peanut and molasses confection. It was introduced at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. R.W.’s brother Louis perfected the secret formula in 1896, which prevents the molasses coated popcorn from sticking together. The prize in each box was introduced in 1912.

1903 A one year old company registered its trade name, Pepsi-Cola. It’s original name was ‘Brad’s Drink’ after Caleb Bradham, the pharmacist who developed the formula. He developed the formula at his drugstore in New Bern, North Carolina. I was the manager of the New Bern Golf & Country Club for a while in the 1980’s.

1909 Archie Fairley Carr was born. An American biologist and authority on turtles. His extensive studies and conservation efforts helped to increase turtle populations around the world.

1937 August Busch III was born, current president and chairman of Anheuser Busch (Budweiser Beer, etc.)

National Crepe Suzette Day

Posted on May 6, 2013

National Crepe Suzette Day

Five Food Finds about Crepe Suzette

  • The most common way to make Crêpe Suzette is to pour liqueur (usually Grand Marnier) over a freshly-cooked crêpe with sugar and light it.
  • This will make the alcohol in the liqueur evaporate, resulting in a fairly thick, caramelised sauce. In a restaurant, a Crêpe Suzette is often prepared in a chafing dish in full view of the guests.
  • The origin of the dish and its name is somewhat disputed. One claim is that the dish was created out of a mistake made by a fourteen year-old assistant waiter Henri Charpentier in 1895 at the Maitre at Monte Carlo’s Café de Paris. He was preparing a dessert for the Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII of the United Kingdom, whose guests included a beautiful French girl named Suzette.
  • Different sources (like the Larousse Gastronomique) however doubt that Charpentier was serving the prince instead of the head waiter because he would have been too young.
  • The other claim states Crêpes Suzette was named in honor of French actress Suzanne Reichenberg (1853–1924), who worked professionally under the name Suzette.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

  • 1806 Chapin Aaron Harris was born. He was cofounder of the first dental school in the world, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery.
  • 1833 John Deere developed the first steel plow.
  • 1851 John Gorrie patented an ice making machine, the first U.S. patent for a mechanical refrigerator.
  • 1862 RIP Henry David Thoreau, American author, philosopher, and naturalist. Author of ‘Walden; or, Life in the Woods.’
  • 1898 Daniel Gerber of baby food fame was born.
  • 1905 Toots Shor, restaurateur was born.
  • 1940 John Steinbeck receives the Pulitzer Prize for his novel ‘The Grapes of Wrath.’
  • 1959 Icelandic gunboats fired on British trawlers during their ‘Cod War’ over fishing rights

  

%d bloggers like this: