Posts tagged “national food holidays

October 27th is National Potato Day! / #NationalPotatoDay

Posted on October 27, 2018

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Happy #NationalPotatoDay

Here are today’s Facts things about the potato:

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  • Despite being delicious fried, baked, or boiled, the root vegetable rarely gets the praise it deserves. The environmentally friendly food crop has played a huge role in our development, but rarely do we give our starchy friend a second thought.
  • They’re cheap and ridiculously easy to grow, and don’t require massive amounts of fertilizer and chemical additives to thrive (although some growers still use them anyway). They’re also good for you providing you’re not eating them in fried form all the time.
  • In 1995, potato plants were taken into space with the space shuttle Columbia. This marked the first time any food was ever grown in space.giphy10
  • The world’s largest potato weighed in at 18 pounds, 4 ounces according to the Guinness Book of World Records.
  • giphy13
  • While potatoes may be synonymous with the Irish these days, they were grown in the Andes mountains centuries before Europeans ever set foot in the new world.

Today’s Food History

  • 1728 Captain James Cook was born. British explorer who charted and named many Pacific Islands, including the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii).
  • 1806 Alphonse Pyrame de Candolle was born. A Swiss botanist, author of ‘Origin of Cultivated Plants.’
  • 1872 Emily Post was born. (or on October 3, 1873). Etiquette expert, newspaper columnist, author of ‘Etiquette in Society, in Business, in Politics, and at Home’ (1922); ‘The Emily Post Cook Book’(1949); ‘Motor Manners’ (1950).
  • 1873 Joseph F. Glidden applied for a patent for barbed wire.
  • 1904 The first subway (underground) rail system in New York City began operating.  The Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT) line was 21 miles long.
  • 1930 ‘Gorgonzola’ was recorded by Jack Hylton & His Orchestra with Leslie Sarony
  • 1975 Rex Stout, American crime writer died. More than 70 of his novels and stories feature the fictional gourmand/gourmet detective, Nero Wolfe. Archie Goodwin, the detective’s assistant, described him as weighing “one seventh of a ton” (about 286 pounds). Shad Roe and Duck were two of Wolfe’s favorites, and he also consumed copious amounts of beer. Stout also published ‘The Nero Wolfe Cookbook’ in 1973.

Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4


 

June 25th is National Strawberry Parfait Day

Posted on June 25, 2018

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It’s National Strawberry Parfait Day

Today’s facts about Strawberries :

  1. Strawberries are one of the only fruits with seeds on the outside.
  2. The average strawberry has 200 seeds.
  3. The ancient Romans believed that strawberries alleviated symptoms of melancholy, fainting, all inflammations, fevers, throat infections, kidney stones, bad breath, attacks of gout, and diseases of the blood, liver and spleen.
  4. To symbolize perfection and righteousness, medieval stone masons carved strawberry designs on altars and around the tops of pillars in churches and cathedrals.
  5. In parts of Bavaria, country folk still practice the annual rite each spring of tying small baskets of wild strawberries to the horns of their cattle as an offering to elves. They believe that the elves, are passionately fond of strawberries, will help to produce healthy calves and an abundance of milk in return.

Today’s Food History

  • 1630 Massachusetts Bay colony governor John Winthrop supposedly introduced the fork to American dining.
  • 1867 Barbed wire was patented by Lucien B Smith of Kent, Ohio.
  • 1938 The new Federal minimum wage law guaranteed workers 40¢ per hour.
  • 1951 Pabst aired the 1st color beer commercial on TV
  • 1971 Sir John Boyd Orr died. A Scottish scientist and nutrition expert, he won the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to eliminate world hunger.
  • 1974 The first checkout scanner was installed in a supermarket.
  • 1994 The London Times reported a previously unknown species of mammal was discovered in Vietnam, the Vu Quang Ox. It was the first discovery of a new large mammal since the Okapi in 1910. The ox is thought to inhabit an area along the Vietnam-Laos border.
  • 1997 Jacques-Yves Cousteau R.I.P. Ocean explorer, marine biologist. Co-inventor of the aqualung.

May 17th is National Cherry Cobbler Day

Posted on May 17, 2018

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National Cherry Cobbler Day 🍒 + 🥧 = 💃🏼🕺🏼

Five Food Finds about Cobbler

  1. A cobbler is a deep dish (casserole or soufflé dish) fruit pie (peach is most common) with only a top biscuit dough crust.
  2. Fruit cobblers can be made with almost any fruit, singly or in combination.
  3. The cobbler takes its name from the biscuit dough crust on top – it is rough looking or ‘cobbled.’   It originated in the U.S. sometime in the early to mid 19th century.
  4. A Cobbler is also a drink, which probably predates the fruit cobbler pie.
  5. A cobbler usually consisted of whiskey or rum with fruit juice and/or sugar, garnished with mint and/or citrus.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1733 England passes the Molasses Act, putting high tariffs on rum and molasses imported to the colonies from anyplace other than Britain and its possessions.

1803 John Hawkins & Richard French patent a Reaping Machine.

1838 Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord died. Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord, known simply as Talleyrand, French statesman, diplomat and grand gourmet, called the ‘first fork of France.’ He served at the top levels of French governments for almost 50 years. During this time his chefs included Bouchee, Careme, and Avice. Many culinary preparations have been created or named for him.

1886 John Deere died. Inventor and manufacturer, he developed the first steel plow in the 1830s, and founded John Deere & Company in 1868.

1967 Tennessee repealed its 1925 law making it illegal to teach evolution in public schools.

1985 The largest salmon, a Chinook salmon, caught with rod and reel weighed over 97 pounds and was caught in Alaska.

1986‘Chicken Song’ by Spitting Image hit #1 in UK.

1992 Lawrence Welk, champagne music-maker, died.

May 14th is National Buttermilk Biscuit Day

Posted on May 14, 2018

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National Buttermilk Biscuit Day

Five Food Finds about Biscuits

  1. In the United Kingdom, the word “biscuit” is used to refer to what we in the United States would call a “cookie”.
  2. White flour, commonly used to bake biscuits, is almost instantly metabolized into sugar.  Biscuits will quickly spike your blood-sugar level.
  3. Mustard is a common condiment to use on biscuits in the south, especially to accompany ham.
  4. Most biscuit recipes call for a healthy dose of butter in the baking process.  Despite this, many people butter their biscuits after they are served as well.
  5. The main difference between biscuits and rolls is the leavening agent.  Biscuits use baking soda.  Rolls use yeast.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1686 Gabriel Fahrenheit was born. Fahrenheit was a German physicist who invented the Fahrenheit temperature scale thermometer. It was the first thermometer to use mercury instead of alcohol, which also extended the temperature range of thermometers.

1853 Gail Borden applied for a patent for condensed milk.

1878 Vaseline petroleum jelly was trademarked by Robert August Chesebrough.

1896 The coldest May temperature ever recorded in the U.S. lower 48 states: Minus 10 F at Climax, Colorado.

1919 Henry John Heinz died. Founder of the H.J. Heinz company and creator of its slogan ’57 varieties.’

1943 Jack Bruce of the music group ‘Cream’ was born.

1985 The first McDonald’s restaurant, in Des Plains, Illinois, became the first fast food museum.

1991 World’s largest burrito created, 1,126 pounds

1994 The FDA announced that the ‘Flavr Savr’ tomato, a biotech developed food, is safe.

2008 The Chicago City Council repealed its ban on the sale of Foie Gras.

 

May 12 is National Nutty Fudge Day

Posted on May 12, 2018

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   Every year on May 12th, the National Nutty Fudge Day is celebrated

You don’t want to miss today if you have a sweet tooth!

Who can resist the crunchy nuts and chocolaty smooth fudge?

Did you know…

  1. The first recorded evidence of fudge being made and sold was a letter written in 1886 and found in the archives of Vasser College by Emelyn Battersby Hartridge who wrote that her schoolmate’s cousin made fudge and sold if for 40 cents a pound in a Baltimore grocery store.
  2. Scottish tablet has been around for much longer, the first note of it being made in The Household Book of Lady Grisell Baillie in the early 18th century which just shows that when it comes to perfecting the art of sweetness, the Scots are way ahead of the game.
  3. There are several origin stories floating around about fudge.
  4. One says that a young apprentice caramel maker was left stirring the pot while the boss was out serving customers. By the time he returned, the caramel was so grainy it was ruined – but the customers loved it, and named it Fudge after the apprentice who mistakenly made it.
  5. Another story goes, that a college lecturer in Virginia, USA, was teaching a class in toffee making, and the temperature was not taken high enough resulting in what we now know as fudge. This, allegedly, is also where the term ‘to fudge something’ comes from.

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Today’s Food History

  • 1777 According to the International Dairy Foods Association, the first ice cream advertisement appeared in the New York Gazette on this date.
  • 1792 R.I.P. Charles-Somon Favart from Belleville, France. A French playwright and pastry cook, one of the founders of the opera comique.
  • 1878 R.I.P. Catherine Esther Beecher. An American educator and author of ‘Miss Beecher’s Domestic Receipt Book’, etc.
  • 1889 R.I.P. John Cadbury. He was the founder of Cadbury chocolate company.
  • 1912 The Beverly Hills Hotel opened.
  • 1994 R.I.P. Roy J. Plunkett. He was the inventor of Teflon (Polytetrafluoroethylene) in 1938. The first nonstick cookware using Teflon was sold in 1960.

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April 1 is Soylent Green Day: “For the people, by the people.”

Posted on March 31, 2018

 

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Interesting Food Facts about Soylent Green

  1. Soylent Green, introduced 1966, is usually considered the original “green” food.
  2. It was first marketed as a, “Miracle food of high-energy plankton gathered from the oceans of the world.”
  3. Throughout the years the company has adopted many slogans:
    • “Food for the people, by the people.”
    • “Make room, make room for green.”
    • “It’s easy being green.”
    • “You’re in good hands with Soylent.”
  4. You can find many recipes for homemade Soylent Green, but there’s nothing like the real thing.
  5. It is said that Charlton Heston was this snack’s #1 fan, keeping mass quantities in his home.

Fun Fact:

The Soylent Green Biscuit Co. is planning on world distribution by 2022.

The Soylent Green Biscuit Co’s famous snack has been a cult classic since its inception in 1973.  People everywhere were delighted to have this affordable snack that “tastes just like grandmas.”

Charlton Heston says that, “When April 1st heralds the coming of Spring, I always think fondly of Soylent Green.”

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Today’s Food History

  • 1582 France adopted the new Gregorian calendar.  Prior to that, the new year was celebrated on April 1.
  • 1755 Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin was born.  In his books, dining is treated as an art form and contains many delightful and witty observations on the pleasures of the table.
  • 1893 The first dishwashing machine became an award winning success at the 1893 Columbian Exposition, which used Josephine Garis Cochran’s hand operated, mechanical dishwashers in its kitchens.  (She patented her original version on December 28, 1886.)  Her company eventually evolved into KitchenAid.
  • 1911 Seaman Asahel Knapp died.  An American agriculturist, he began the system which evolved into the U.S. Cooperative Extension Service.
  • 1932 Actor Gordon Jump was born.  The ‘Maytag Repairman’ in commercials, also Arthur Carlson on ‘WKRP in Cincinnati’
  • 1960 Tiros I, the first weather observation satellite was launched from Cape Kennedy.
  • 1976 Jimmy Buffet’s ‘Margaritaville’ was released.
  • 1976 Carl Peter Henrik Dam died. Dam was a Danish biochemist who discovered vitamin K in 1939.
  • 1994 Ray Geiger died (born Sept 18, 1910).  Editor of theFarmers’ Almanac from 1934-1993, and editor of American Farm & Home Almanac from 1964-1990.
  • 1996 The Taco Bell fast food chain played an April Food joke on the American public by claiming to have bought the Liberty Bell to help pay down the national debt
  • 1999 The first minimum wage goes into effect in Britain, £3.60 an hour for adults and £3.00 an hour for those under 22 years old.
  • 1999 In April 1999, Restaurant Nora in Washington DC became America’s first certified organic restaurant.  This means that 95% or more of everything that you eat at the restaurant has been produced by certified organic growers and farmers.

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March 23rd is National Chips and Dip Day!

Posted on March 23, 2018

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Happy National Chip and Dip Day!

Here are today’s food facts about Chips and Dip:

giphy4

The potato chip was first invented in 1853.

Dips for chips first become popular in the 1950s serving as finger food.

Hummus, as part of Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines for centuries, did not appear in the United States until after World War II.

Falafel Greek Food Authentic Greek Hummus Mezes

It takes 10,000 pounds of potatoes to make 3,500 pounds of potato chips.

Dips can be salsa, guacamole, cheese, hummus, olive dip – anything can be made into a dip.

Tortilla Snack Mexican Food Meal Nachos Yellow

Today’s Food History

  • 1699 John Bartram was born.  American naturalist and explorer, considered ‘father of American botany’; established a world renowned botanical garden in Philadelphia in 1728.
  • 1857 Fannie Merritt Farmer was born.  American culinary authority, and author of the 1896 edition of ‘The Boston Cooking School Cook Book‘ which became known in future editions as the ‘Fannie Farmer Cook Book.’  Director of the Boston Cooking School, and founder of Miss Farmer’s School of Cookery.  She is often cited as the first cookbook author to introduce standard measurements.
  • 1880 A patent for a glass milk bottle was issued to Warren Glass Works.
  • 1912 The Dixie Cup was developed by Lawrence Luellen and Hugh Moore.  Its original name was the ‘Health Kup,’ changed to ‘Dixie Cup‘ in 1919.  The name came from a line of dolls made by the Dixie Doll Company.
  • 2008 R.I.P. Al Copeland, the founder of Popeye’s restaurant chain.

Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4


 

October 27th is National Potato Day!

Posted on October 27, 2017

High-res version

 

Happy #NationalPotatoDay

Here are today’s Facts things about the potato:

giphy7

  • Despite being delicious fried, baked, or boiled, the root vegetable rarely gets the praise it deserves. The environmentally friendly food crop has played a huge role in our development, but rarely do we give our starchy friend a second thought.
  • They’re cheap and ridiculously easy to grow, and don’t require massive amounts of fertilizer and chemical additives to thrive (although some growers still use them anyway). They’re also good for you providing you’re not eating them in fried form all the time.
  • In 1995, potato plants were taken into space with the space shuttle Columbia. This marked the first time any food was ever grown in space.giphy10
  • The world’s largest potato weighed in at 18 pounds, 4 ounces according to the Guinness Book of World Records.
  • giphy13
  • While potatoes may be synonymous with the Irish these days, they were grown in the Andes mountains centuries before Europeans ever set foot in the new world.

Today’s Food History

  • 1728 Captain James Cook was born. British explorer who charted and named many Pacific Islands, including the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii).
  • 1806 Alphonse Pyrame de Candolle was born. A Swiss botanist, author of ‘Origin of Cultivated Plants.’
  • 1872 Emily Post was born. (or on October 3, 1873). Etiquette expert, newspaper columnist, author of ‘Etiquette in Society, in Business, in Politics, and at Home’ (1922); ‘The Emily Post Cook Book’(1949); ‘Motor Manners’ (1950).
  • 1873 Joseph F. Glidden applied for a patent for barbed wire.
  • 1904 The first subway (underground) rail system in New York City began operating.  The Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT) line was 21 miles long.
  • 1930 ‘Gorgonzola’ was recorded by Jack Hylton & His Orchestra with Leslie Sarony
  • 1975 Rex Stout, American crime writer died. More than 70 of his novels and stories feature the fictional gourmand/gourmet detective, Nero Wolfe. Archie Goodwin, the detective’s assistant, described him as weighing “one seventh of a ton” (about 286 pounds). Shad Roe and Duck were two of Wolfe’s favorites, and he also consumed copious amounts of beer. Stout also published ‘The Nero Wolfe Cookbook’ in 1973.

Check out my book!

Foodimentary_945x347v4


 

June 25th is National Strawberry Parfait Day

Posted on June 25, 2017

High-res version

Today’s facts about Strawberries :

  1. Strawberries are one of the only fruits with seeds on the outside.
  2. The average strawberry has 200 seeds.
  3. The ancient Romans believed that strawberries alleviated symptoms of melancholy, fainting, all inflammations, fevers, throat infections, kidney stones, bad breath, attacks of gout, and diseases of the blood, liver and spleen.
  4. To symbolize perfection and righteousness, medieval stone masons carved strawberry designs on altars and around the tops of pillars in churches and cathedrals.
  5. In parts of Bavaria, country folk still practice the annual rite each spring of tying small baskets of wild strawberries to the horns of their cattle as an offering to elves. They believe that the elves, are passionately fond of strawberries, will help to produce healthy calves and an abundance of milk in return.

Today’s Food History

  • 1630 Massachusetts Bay colony governor John Winthrop supposedly introduced the fork to American dining.
  • 1867 Barbed wire was patented by Lucien B Smith of Kent, Ohio.
  • 1938 The new Federal minimum wage law guaranteed workers 40¢ per hour.
  • 1951 Pabst aired the 1st color beer commercial on TV
  • 1971 Sir John Boyd Orr died. A Scottish scientist and nutrition expert, he won the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to eliminate world hunger.
  • 1974 The first checkout scanner was installed in a supermarket.
  • 1994 The London Times reported a previously unknown species of mammal was discovered in Vietnam, the Vu Quang Ox. It was the first discovery of a new large mammal since the Okapi in 1910. The ox is thought to inhabit an area along the Vietnam-Laos border.
  • 1997 Jacques-Yves Cousteau R.I.P. Ocean explorer, marine biologist. Co-inventor of the aqualung.

March 23rd is National Chips and Dip Day!

Posted on March 23, 2017

High-res version

Here are today’s food facts about Chips and Dip:

giphy4

The potato chip was first invented in 1853.

Dips for chips first become popular in the 1950s serving as finger food.

Hummus, as part of Middle Eastern and Mediterranean cuisines for centuries, did not appear in the United States until after World War II.

Falafel Greek Food Authentic Greek Hummus Mezes

It takes 10,000 pounds of potatoes to make 3,500 pounds of potato chips.

Dips can be salsa, guacamole, cheese, hummus, olive dip – anything can be made into a dip.

Tortilla Snack Mexican Food Meal Nachos Yellow

Today’s Food History

  • 1699 John Bartram was born.  American naturalist and explorer, considered ‘father of American botany’; established a world renowned botanical garden in Philadelphia in 1728.
  • 1857 Fannie Merritt Farmer was born.  American culinary authority, and author of the 1896 edition of ‘The Boston Cooking School Cook Book‘ which became known in future editions as the ‘Fannie Farmer Cook Book.’  Director of the Boston Cooking School, and founder of Miss Farmer’s School of Cookery.  She is often cited as the first cookbook author to introduce standard measurements.
  • 1880 A patent for a glass milk bottle was issued to Warren Glass Works.
  • 1912 The Dixie Cup was developed by Lawrence Luellen and Hugh Moore.  Its original name was the ‘Health Kup,’ changed to ‘Dixie Cup‘ in 1919.  The name came from a line of dolls made by the Dixie Doll Company.
  • 2008 R.I.P. Al Copeland, the founder of Popeye’s restaurant chain.

June 25th is National Strawberry Parfait Day

Posted on June 25, 2016

High-res version

Today’s facts about Strawberries :

  1. Strawberries are the only fruit with seeds on the outside.
  2. The average strawberry has 200 seeds.
  3. The ancient Romans believed that strawberries alleviated symptoms of melancholy, fainting, all inflammations, fevers, throat infections, kidney stones, bad breath, attacks of gout, and diseases of the blood, liver and spleen.
  4. To symbolize perfection and righteousness, medieval stone masons carved strawberry designs on altars and around the tops of pillars in churches and cathedrals.
  5. In parts of Bavaria, country folk still practice the annual rite each spring of tying small baskets of wild strawberries to the horns of their cattle as an offering to elves. They believe that the elves, are passionately fond of strawberries, will help to produce healthy calves and an abundance of milk in return.

Today’s Food History

  • 1630 Massachusetts Bay colony governor John Winthrop supposedly introduced the fork to American dining.
  • 1867 Barbed wire was patented by Lucien B Smith of Kent, Ohio.
  • 1938 The new Federal minimum wage law guaranteed workers 40¢ per hour.
  • 1951 Pabst aired the 1st color beer commercial on TV
  • 1971 Sir John Boyd Orr died. A Scottish scientist and nutrition expert, he won the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to eliminate world hunger.
  • 1974 The first checkout scanner was installed in a supermarket.
  • 1994 The London Times reported a previously unknown species of mammal was discovered in Vietnam, the Vu Quang Ox. It was the first discovery of a new large mammal since the Okapi in 1910. The ox is thought to inhabit an area along the Vietnam-Laos border.
  • 1997 Jacques-Yves Cousteau R.I.P. Ocean explorer, marine biologist. Co-inventor of the aqualung.

May 20th is National Quiche Lorraine Day

Posted on May 20, 2016

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Five Food Finds about Quiche

  1.  Quiche is a savoury , custard pie usually filled with cheese, meat, seafood or vegetables.
  2.  The word “quiche” come from French, which originally borrowed the word from Lorraine Franconian “Küeche” (meaning “cake”).
  3. Quiche originated in Germany, although today it is known as a classic French dish.
  4. The original recipe for quiche lorraine was an open pie with a filling of custard with smoked bacon or lardons and cheese was not added till later .
  5. The world largest quiche was made by Chef Alain Marcotullio. It based for over 18 hours and fed more than 125 people.

 

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1506 Christopher Columbus, explorer, died.

1799 Honore de Balzac Born. French author. Balzac would lock himself away during creative bursts, drinking coffee and eating only fruit and eggs. When he finally took a break, he was known to consume huge quantities of food. One report recalls that at the Véry restaurant he ate “a hundred Ostend oysters, twelve cutlets of salt-meadow mutton, a duck with turnips, two partridges and a Normandy sole,” not to mention the desserts, fruit and liqueurs he also consumed.

1810 On this day Dolly Madison, wife of president James Madison, supposedly served the first ice cream at the White House, for a reception.

1862 President Lincoln signed the Homestead Act into law. It opened millions of acres Western land to settlers.

1874 Jeans with copper rivets are patented by Levi Strauss and Jacob Davis.

1875 The International Bureau of Weights and Measures was created.

1884 L. Blue patented a hand corn sheller.

1892 George Sampson received a patent for a clothes dryer.

1913 William Hewlett was born. Founder with David Packard of Hewlett Packard Company. Before they became famous for computers and printers etc., some of their early inventions were an automatic urinal flusher and a weight loss shock machine!

1961 The record Jewfish weighed 680 pounds and was caught in Fernandina Beach, Florida.

1993 The last episode of ‘Cheers’ aired on TV.

2005 Governor Jeb Bush signed a bill making the orange the official State Fruit of Florida. The orange blossom and orange juice have been previously declared the official state flower and official state beverage.

2009 Hot Dog Wars: Sara Lee (Ball Park Franks) sued Kraft Foods (Oscar Mayer Jumbo Beef Franks) over claims that Oscar Mayer franks are better than Ball Park Franks.

May 19th is National Devil’s Food Cake Day

Posted on May 19, 2016

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National Devil’s Food Cake Day

Five Food Finds about Devil’s Food Cake

  1.  Devil’s food cake is considered a counterpart to the white or yellow angel food cake.
  2. Devil’s food cake is generally more moist and airy than other chocolate cakes, and often uses cocoa as opposed to chocolate for the flavor as well as coffee.
  3. Devil’s food cake was introduced in the United States in the early 20th century with the recipe in print as early as 1905.
  4. A similar cake, the red velvet cake, is closely linked to a devil’s food cake, and in some turn of the century cookbooks the two names may have been interchangeable.
  5. Devil’s food cake incorporates butter (or a substitute), egg whites, flour (while some chocolate cakes are flourless) and less egg than other chocolate cakes.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1834 Catharine Furbish was born. An American botanist, she spent almost 40 years traveling and painting watercolors of the flora of the state of Maine.

1910 The Earth passed through the tail of Halley’s Comet and nothing happened.  There had been dire predictions that everyone would die, and many hucksters sold ‘comet pills’ to counter the effects of the ‘comet gas.’

1962 Marilyn Monroe sings ‘Happy Birthday’ at a birthday salute to President John F. Kennedy at Madison Square Garden.

2006 Nicole Belinda Franzen Reese was chosen as the 59th ‘Alice in Dairyland’ by the Wisconsin Dept. of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection. She will be the spokesperson for the states agriculture industry.

 

May 18th is National Cheese Souffle Day

Posted on May 18, 2016

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National Cheese Souffle Day

Five Food Finds about Soufflet

  1. A souffle is essentially a simple white sauce enriched with egg yolk. Stiff egg whites are folded right into the mixture. At this point, you can add whatever flavor you like: cheese, vegetables, chocolate or fruit.
  2. The secret to a great souffle is to beat the egg whites into stiff white peak consistency and to fold them carefully into the sauce to keep as much air in the mixture as possible.
  3. Savory souffles are often too light for a main course, but the addition of chicken and spinach here bolsters this into a substantial main course. When you break into it with your fork, the seductive aroma of cheese, chicken and spinach pours out. It’s elegant, airy and fluffy.
  4. The secret to success is making sure your timing is just right. So plan ahead carefully; figure out what you will be serving first — such as a salad or soup — and time the souffle to go into the oven as you sit down for your first course.
  5. You can wait for a souffle, but a souffle waits for no one. You don’t want to serve a deflated souffle.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1808 Elijah Craig died. A Baptist minister in Kentucky, he is an important figure in the invention of Bourbon Whiskey. He ran a paper mill and started a distillery in 1789. Legend credits him with being the first to use new charred oak barrels to age corn whiskey, which is a key step in making bourbon.

1935 Allan Burns was born.  Screenwriter and producer, co-creator of The Mary Tyler Moore Show and Rhoda.  He also created the character Captain Horatio Magellan Crunch for Quaker Oats ‘Cap’n Crunch’  breakfast cereal.

1955 Chow Yun-Fat was born. Internationally famous Hong Kong actor.

1995 Elisha Cook Jr. died. A well known character actor in films and TV. I remember him mainly in his role as Wilmer, in the ‘Maltese Falcon’.

2001 Hong Kong ordered more than 1 million chickens and other poultry killed to halt the spread of another bird flu epidemic.

 

May 17th is National Cherry Cobbler Day

Posted on May 17, 2016

High-res version

National Cherry Cobbler Day

Five Food Finds about Cobbler

  1. A cobbler is a deep dish (casserole or soufflé dish) fruit pie (peach is most common) with only a top biscuit dough crust.
  2. Fruit cobblers can be made with almost any fruit, singly or in combination.
  3. The cobbler takes its name from the biscuit dough crust on top – it is rough looking or ‘cobbled.’   It originated in the U.S. sometime in the early to mid 19th century.
  4. A Cobbler is also a drink, which probably predates the fruit cobbler pie.
  5. A cobbler usually consisted of whiskey or rum with fruit juice and/or sugar, garnished with mint and/or citrus.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1733 England passes the Molasses Act, putting high tariffs on rum and molasses imported to the colonies from anyplace other than Britain and its possessions.

1803 John Hawkins & Richard French patent a Reaping Machine.

1838 Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord died. Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord, known simply as Talleyrand, French statesman, diplomat and grand gourmet, called the ‘first fork of France.’ He served at the top levels of French governments for almost 50 years. During this time his chefs included Bouchee, Careme, and Avice. Many culinary preparations have been created or named for him.

1886 John Deere died. Inventor and manufacturer, he developed the first steel plow in the 1830s, and founded John Deere & Company in 1868.

1967 Tennessee repealed its 1925 law making it illegal to teach evolution in public schools.

1985 The largest salmon, a Chinook salmon, caught with rod and reel weighed over 97 pounds and was caught in Alaska.

1986 ‘Chicken Song’ by Spitting Image hit #1 in UK.

1992 Lawrence Welk, champagne music-maker, died.

 

May 15th is National Chocolate Chip Day

Posted on May 15, 2016

High-res version

National Chocolate Chip Day

Five Food Finds about Chocolate Chips

  1. Originally, chocolate chips were made of semi-sweet chocolate, but today there are many flavors. These include bittersweet chocolate chips, peanut butter chips, butterscotch chips, mint chocolate chips, white chocolate chips, dark chocolate chips, milk chocolate chips, and white and dark swirled chocolate chips.
  2. Chocolate chips were invented in 1933 when Ruth Graves Wakefield of the Toll House Inn in the town of Whitman, Massachusetts added cut-up chunks of a semi-sweet Nestlé chocolate bar to a cookie recipe.
  3. The cookies were a huge success, and Wakefield reached an agreement with Nestlé to add her recipe to the chocolate bar’s packaging in exchange for a lifetime supply of chocolate.
  4. Initially, Nestlé included a small chopping tool with the chocolate bars, but in 1939 they started selling the chocolate in chip (or “morsel”) form.
  5. The Nestlé brand Toll House cookies is named for the inn.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1923 Listerine was registered as a trademark.

1930 Mrs. Ellen Church, a registered nurse, became the world’s first airline stewardess (flight attendant). The 11 passengers were flying on a United Airlines tri-motor Boeing 80A from San Francisco to Cheyenne, Wyoming. The meal was chicken, fruit salad and rolls.

1940 Nylon stockings went on sale for the first time in the U.S. in Wilmington, Delaware.

1989 Hershey’s reduces the size of the Hershey bar to 1.55 ounces. The price remains 40 cents.

1991 The famous Paris cooking school, L’Ecole de Cordon Bleu, opens a branch in Tokyo, Japan.

2007 Karen Hess, culinary historian, died. Some of her books were ‘The Taste of America‘ (1977) and ‘Carolina Rice Kitchen: The African Connection‘ (1992). She also annotated Mary Randolph’s ‘Virginia Housewife‘ (1983).

 

May 14th is National Buttermilk Biscuit Day

Posted on May 14, 2016

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National Buttermilk Biscuit Day

Five Food Finds about Biscuits

  1. In the United Kingdom, the word “biscuit” is used to refer to what we in the United States would call a “cookie”.
  2. White flour, commonly used to bake biscuits, is almost instantly metabolized into sugar.  Biscuits will quickly spike your blood-sugar level.
  3. Mustard is a common condiment to use on biscuits in the south, especially to accompany ham.
  4. Most biscuit recipes call for a healthy dose of butter in the baking process.  Despite this, many people butter their biscuits after they are served as well.
  5. The main difference between biscuits and rolls is the leavening agent.  Biscuits use baking soda.  Rolls use yeast.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1686 Gabriel Fahrenheit was born. Fahrenheit was a German physicist who invented the Fahrenheit temperature scale thermometer. It was the first thermometer to use mercury instead of alcohol, which also extended the temperature range of thermometers.

1853 Gail Borden applied for a patent for condensed milk.

1878 Vaseline petroleum jelly was trademarked by Robert August Chesebrough.

1896 The coldest May temperature ever recorded in the U.S. lower 48 states: Minus 10 F at Climax, Colorado.

1919 Henry John Heinz died. Founder of the H.J. Heinz company and creator of its slogan ’57 varieties.’

1943 Jack Bruce of the music group ‘Cream’ was born.

1985 The first McDonald’s restaurant, in Des Plains, Illinois, became the first fast food museum.

1991 World’s largest burrito created, 1,126 pounds

1994 The FDA announced that the ‘Flavr Savr’ tomato, a biotech developed food, is safe.

2008 The Chicago City Council repealed its ban on the sale of Foie Gras.

 

May 13th is National Apple Pie Day

Posted on May 13, 2016

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National Apple Pie Day

Five Food Finds about Apple Pie

  1. The first printed reference to apple pie was in 1589 by Robert Greene in ‘Arcadia’: “Thy breath is like the steame of apple-pyes.”
  2. Tradition has it that Yale College served apple pie at every supper for more than 100 years
  3. There is an old saying: ‘Apple pie without cheese is like a kiss without a squeeze.’
  4. Americas favorite dessert, so much so that some things are said to be as American as apple pie.
  5. McDonald’s added an apple pie dessert to its menu in 1968.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1637 I am not totally confident with the month and day, but supposedly, Cardinal Richelieu ‘created’ the table knife when he had the points rounded on all knives to be used at his table. Presumably so no one could stab him.

1884 Cyrus Hall McCormick died. He is generally credited with the development of the mechanical reaper

1958 Velcro was trademarked.

1993 The Red Hot Chili Peppers play on the Simpsons TV show.

2008 Robert Mondavi died at age 94. A leading Napa Valley vintner who helped establish California wines among the best in the world.

 

May 12 – National Nutty Fudge Day

Posted on May 12, 2016

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National Nutty Fudge Day

Five Food Finds about Fudge

  1. The first recorded evidence of fudge being made and sold was a letter written in 1886 and found in the archives of Vasser College by Emelyn Battersby Hartridge who wrote that her schoolmate’s cousin made fudge and sold if for 40 cents a pound in a Baltimore grocery store.
  2. Scottish tablet has been around for much longer, the first note of it being made in The Household Book of Lady Grisell Baillie in the early 18th century which just shows that when it comes to perfecting the art of sweetness, the Scots are way ahead of the game.
  3. There are several origin stories floating around about fudge.
  4. One says that a young apprentice caramel maker was left stirring the pot while the boss was out serving customers. By the time he returned, the caramel was so grainy it was ruined – but the customers loved it, and named it Fudge after the apprentice who mistakenly made it.
  5. Another story goes, that a college lecturer in Virginia, USA, was teaching a class in toffee making, and the temperature was not taken high enough resulting in what we now know as fudge. This, allegedly, is also where the term ‘to fudge something’ comes from.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1777 According to the International Dairy Foods Association, the first ice cream advertisement appeared in the New York Gazette on this date.

1792 Charles-Somon Favart died in Belleville, France. A French playwright and pastry cook, one of the founders of the opera comique.

1878 Catherine Esther Beecher died. An American educator and author of ‘Miss Beecher’s Domestic Receipt Book’, etc.

1889 John Cadbury died. He was the founder of Cadbury chocolate company.

1912 The Beverly Hills Hotel opened.

1994 Roy J. Plunkett died. He was the inventor of Teflon (Polytetrafluoroethylene) in 1938. The first nonstick cookware using Teflon was sold in 1960.

 

May 11 – National “Eat What You Want” Day

Posted on May 11, 2016

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National “Eat What You Want” Day

According to the Daily Mail, the five most popular foods in US: 

1. Steak

2. Chicken

3. Pizza

4. Waffles

5. Beef

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1838 Thomas Andrew Knight died. British horticulturist and botanist who experimented with geotropism, phototropism and heliotropism.

1886 W. Marshall patented a ‘grain binder.’

1934 The Dust Bowl.  One of the worst dust storms ever to hit the Great Plains occurred. It lasted 2 days and the area lost massive amounts of top soil.

1946 The first CARE packages for survivors of WW II in Europe arrive at Le Havre, France. (Cooperative for American Remittances to Europe).

1947 B.F. Goodrich announced the development of the tubeless tire.

2002 Joseph Bonanno, a former Mafia boss known as ‘Joe Bananas,’ died in Tucson, Arizona at age 97.

 

May 10th is National Liver and Onions Day

Posted on May 10, 2016

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National Liver and Onions Day

Five Food Finds about Liver and Onions

  1.  Liver and onions is a favorite in the UK and in Germany, where it is usually eaten along with boiled or mashed potatoes.
  2.  Lamb’s liver is the usual choice in the UK and is often accompanied by fried bacon.
  3. In the French traditional recipe the liver is fried with butter and lard.
  4. In Catalan cuisine olive oil is used, instead of butter, and fried garlic is added to the mixture.
  5. In the USA, liver and onions as a dish once enjoyed widespread popularity and could usually be found at family diners and American home-style restaurants. This meal is currently more common to the cuisines of the southern and upper mid-western style foods.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1566 Leonhard Fuchs died. He was a German botanist who compiled the first modern, organized listing of plants and botanical terms, ‘Historia Stirpium’ in 1542. The plant and the color fuchsia were named for him.

1818 Paul Revere died. A silversmith and American Revolutionary folk hero, he also made surgical instruments and false teeth.

1850 Sir Thomas Johnston Lipton, grocer and tea merchant, was born.

1898 The first vending machine law was passed in Omaha, Nebraska.

1920 John Wesley Hyatt died. He developed the process for making celluloid, the first synthetic plastic. He also invented a water purifying system and a sugar cane mill. 2010 A 10 year-old 3rd grade student in Texas was given 1 week’s detention for being in possession of a candy bar at lunch time. The candy bar was also confiscated.

May 9 – National Shrimp Day

Posted on May 9, 2016

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National Shrimp Day

Five Food Finds about Shrimp

  1. The pistol shrimp can deliver an explosive attack hotter than the surface of the sun and loud enough to rupture a human ear drum.
  2. Every shrimp is actually born male, and some develop into females.
  3. Some shrimp are actually capable of glowing in the dark.
  4. Shrimp can vary in size from 1/2 inch to 12 inches.
  5. In some areas, shrimp served with the head still attached is considered a delicacy.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1785 The beer-pump handle was patented by Joseph Bramah.

1845 Carl Gustaf Patrik de Laval was born. A Swedish scientist and inventor. Among his inventions was the centrifugal cream separator and a vacuum milking machine.

1914 C. W. Post (Charles William) died. He founded the Postum Cereal Co. in 1895 (renamed General Foods Corp. in 1922) to manufacture Postum cereal beverage; 1897 Grape Nuts, 1904 Post Toasties (originally called Elijah’s Mana).

1992 The record brown trout weighed over 40 pounds and was caught in Arkansas.

 

May 8th is National Coconut Cream Pie Day

Posted on May 8, 2016

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National Coconut Cream Pie Day

Five Food Finds about Coconuts

  1. The coconut is not a nut.  In fact, it isn’t a fruit either.  It is a seed!
  2. Coconut oils accelerate the metabolism.  Of course, if you put them in pie you may not notice the effect.
  3. The sailors aboard Vasco de Gama’s ships gave the coconut its name.  They called it “Coco”, named after a grimacing face or hobgoblin.
  4. The water from the coconut has traditionally been used when commercial IV solutions of plasma have not been available.
  5. Coconut oils also contain four growth hormones, called cytokinins, and three sets of chromosomes – or triploids – that help the development of many organisms.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1842 Emil Christian Hansen was born. He was a Danish botanist who developed new methods to culture yeast. He revolutionized the beer industry, and proved that there are different species of yeast. He refused to patent the method, but instead made it available for free to other brewers.

1855 John Gates was born. Gates was an inventor, promoter and barbed wire manufacturer.

1886 Coca Cola is first sold to the public at Jacob’s Pharmacy in Atlanta, Georgia.

1968 Laurence M. Klauber died. Klauber was an American herpetologist and inventor who was a rattlesnake expert. If you want to know anything or everything about rattlesnakes, see his book “Rattlesnakes: Their Habits, Life Histories and Influence on Mankind.”


Check out my book!

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May 7 – National Roast Leg of Lamb Day

Posted on May 7, 2016

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National Roast Leg of Lamb Day

Five Food Facts about Lamb

  1. Lamb, mutton, and hogget (UK, New Zealand and Australia) are the meat of domestic sheep.  The meat of a sheep in its first year is lamb; that of a juvenile sheep older than 1 year is hogget; and the meat of an adult sheep is mutton.
  2. On average, a three ounce serving of lamb has only 175 calories and meets the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) definition for lean. According to FDA guidelines, lean meat has less than 10 grams of fat, less than 4.5 grams of saturated fat, and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 100 grams or 3.5 ounces.
  3. The meat of a lamb is taken from the animal between one month and one year old, with a carcase (carcass in American English) weight of between 5.5 and 30 kilograms (12 and 65 lbs).
  4. This meat generally is more tender than that from older sheep and appears more often on tables in some Western countries.
  1. Lamb should be stored in the refrigerator or freezer immediately after purchasing. Refrigerate fresh lamb at 40 degrees or below.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1660 Isaack B. Fubine of The Hague received a patent for macaroni.
(This fact is reported on many sites on the internet. No one has any further information listed, and I am in doubt as to its accuracy).

1873 Salmon Portland Chase died. He was Secretary of the Treasury under Abraham Lincoln, and later Chief Justice.

1947 The ‘Kraft Television Theater’ premiered on NBC TV

1953 The world record swordfish was caught in Chile: 1,182 pounds.

1987 Shelly Long, who played Diane Chambers, makes her final appearance as a regular on ‘Cheers.’

 

May 6 – National Crepe Suzette Day

Posted on May 6, 2016

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National Crepe Suzette Day

Five Food Finds about Crepe Suzette:

  1. The most common way to make Crêpe Suzette is to pour liqueur (usually Grand Marnier) over a freshly-cooked crêpe with sugar and light it.
  2. This will make the alcohol in the liqueur evaporate, resulting in a fairly thick, caramelised sauce. In a restaurant, a Crêpe Suzette is often prepared in a chafing dish in full view of the guests.
  3. The origin of the dish and its name is somewhat disputed. One claim is that the dish was created out of a mistake made by a fourteen year-old assistant waiter Henri Charpentier in 1895 at the Maitre at Monte Carlo’s Café de Paris. He was preparing a dessert for the Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII of the United Kingdom, whose guests included a beautiful French girl named Suzette.
  4. Different sources (like the Larousse Gastronomique) however doubt that Charpentier was serving the prince instead of the head waiter because he would have been too young.
  5. The other claim states Crêpes Suzette was named in honor of French actress Suzanne Reichenberg (1853–1924), who worked professionally under the name Suzette.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1806 Chapin Aaron Harris was born. He was cofounder of the first dental school in the world, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery.

1833 John Deere developed the first steel plow.

1851 John Gorrie patented an ice making machine, the first U.S. patent for a mechanical refrigerator.

1862 Henry David Thoreau Died. American author, philosopher, and naturalist. Author of ‘Walden; or, Life in the Woods.’

1898 Daniel Gerber of baby food fame was born.

1905 Toots Shor, restaurateur was born.

1940 John Steinbeck receives the Pulitzer Prize for his novel ‘The Grapes of Wrath.’

1959 Icelandic gunboats fired on British trawlers during their ‘Cod War’ over fishing rights

 

May 5 – National Enchilada Day

Posted on May 5, 2016

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Happy National Enchilada Day!

Five Food Finds about Enchiladas:

  1. The enchilada is one of the dishes mentioned in Mexico’s first cookbook in 1831.
  2. Enchilada is the past participle of Spanish enchilar, “to add chile pepper to”, literally to “season (or decorate) with chile.”
  3. Enchiladas originated in Mexico, where the practice of rolling tortillas around other food dates back at least to Mayan times.
  4. Writing at the time of the Spanish conquistadors, Bernal Díaz del Castillo documented a feast enjoyed by Europeans hosted by Hernán Cortés in Coyoacán, which included foods served in corn tortillas.
  5. In the 19th century, as Mexican cuisine was being memorialized, enchiladas were mentioned in the first Mexican cookbook, El cocinero mexicano (“The Mexican Chef”), published in 1831, and in Mariano Galvan Rivera’s Diccionario de Cocina, published in 1845.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1865 Nellie Bly (Elizabeth Jane Cochran) was born. In 1889 Bly successfully completed an attempt to beat the record of Jules Verne’s fictional Phileas Fogg to go ‘Around the World in Eighty Days’. Bly was a U.S. newspaper reporter and completed the journey in 72 days, 6 hours, 11 minutes and 14 seconds.

1903 James Beard, culinary expert and cookbook author was born. Quote: “The kitchen, reasonably enough, was the scene of my first gastronomic adventure. I was on all fours. I crawled into the vegetable bin, settled on a giant onion and ate it, skin and all. It must have marked me for life, for I have never ceased to love the hearty flavor of raw onions”.

1925 John T. Scopes was arrested for teaching Darwin’s theory of evolution in a Tennessee public school.

1926 Ann B. Davis was born. She played the role of Alice the housekeeper and cook on the TV show ‘The Brady Bunch’ (1969-1974).

1936 A patent was granted for the first bottle with a screw cap to Edward Ravenscroft of Glencoe, Illinois.

 

May 4 – National Hoagie Day

Posted on May 4, 2016

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Happy National Hoagie Day!

Five Food Finds about Hoagies:

  1. The original “hoagie” is what is now referred to as an “Italian Hoagie” which includes a variety of traditional Italian lunch meats, including dry salami, mortadella, capicolla, and provolone served with lettuce, tomato and onions with a light vinegar and oil dressing.
  2. Former Philadelphia mayor (also once Pennsylvania governor) Ed Rendell declared the hoagie the “Official Sandwich of Philadelphia”.
  3. Most hoagie shops offer single-meat hoagies (for example, ham or salami hoagies) as well as premium hoagies with upscale ingredients: prosciutto, imported Italian lunchmeats (cotechino, mortadella, sopressata, etc.). A popular variant is the grinder or cosmo, which is essentially a hoagie that has been toasted under a broiler.
  4. Many takeout shops in Chicago sell a “hoagy” (sic.), usually containing steak and other ingredients, with the option of being “heated.” They also sell cheesesteak, referred to most often as “Philly Steak.”
  5. In many areas the default cheese on a hoagie is Provolone, while in others it is white American cheese. Cheese-only hoagies (Provolone, American, or Mixed) replace the meat with extra slices of cheese.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1494 Columbus landed at Jamaica and met the Arawak Indians. The Arawak used Jamaican pimento (allspice) to season and smoke meat (usually pigs), the foundation upon which Jamaican Jerk developed.

1854 Asa Fitch was appointed as New York state entomologist, the first such in the U.S. He studied insects and their effects on agricultural crops.

1942 War time food rationing began in the U.S.

 

May 3 – National Chocolate Custard Day

Posted on May 3, 2016

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Happy National Chocolate Custard Day!

Five Food Finds about Custard:

  1. Due to the fact that it is a very fine organic powder, custard powder is EXPLOSIVE!
  2. Custard is a variety of culinary preparations based on a cooked mixture of milk or cream and egg yolk.
  3. Depending on how much egg or thickener is used, custard may vary in consistency from a thin pouring sauce (crème anglaise), to a thick pastry cream used to fill éclairs.
  4. The most common custards are used as desserts or dessert sauces and typically include sugar and vanilla.
  5. Custard bases may also be used for quiches and other savory foods.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1654 A bridge in Rowley, Massachusetts began charging a toll for animals. People passed for free.

1913 William Motter Inge was born. An American playwright, he was the author of ‘Picnic’ which was also filmed in 1956.

1937 Francis Stephen Castelluccio was born. Better known as Frankie Valli of ‘The Four Seasons’ singing group.

1939 The Andrew Sisters recorded ‘Beer Barrel Polka.’

1944 Most wartime meat rationing ended in the United States.

1947 Sylvester tried to have Tweety Bird for lunch for the first time in a Warner Brothers cartoon. 1959 Passing through the newly opened St. Lawrence Seaway (see April 25) the British freighter ‘Ramon de Larrinaga’ becomes the first deep draft ocean ship to enter the Duluth, Minnesota harbor.

2007 Jamison Stone, 11 years old, bagged a ‘wild hog’ that weighed in at over 1050 pounds. He was hunting on a commercial huntng preserve with his father and several guides in eastern Alabama.  The animal measured 9 feet 4 inches long, nose to tail.

 

Chocolate Mousse Day

Posted on May 2, 2016

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Happy National Chocolate Mousse Day!

Five Food Finds about Chocolate Mousse:

  • If you are in France, no matter which region, no matter where you eat, you will most likely be offered the divine French dessert Mousse au Chocolat.
  • The word “mousse” is a French word that means foam, so Mousse au Chocolat means chocolate foam.
  • When mousse first hit the culinary scene in 1894 it was reserved for savory dishes like fish and vegetables.
  • In the early 1900’s, the famous French artist Toulouse Lautrec had the brilliant idea of mixing in chocolate to the graceful and airy invention.
  • Thankfully the name that he first gave it, ‘mayonnaise de chocolat’, has been changed.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1878 At 7 a.m., the Washburn A flour mill in Minneapolis exploded, sending the roof 500 feet in the air. 18 workers were killed and seven other flour mills were also destroyed.

1885 Good Housekeeping magazine begins publication. Founded by Clark W. Bryan, the magazine was purchased by Hearst publishing in 1911.

1934 Sergey Vasilyevich Lebedev died. A Russian chemist who developed a method for large scale production of synthetic rubber. Production of polybutadiene was begun in 1932 using potatoes and limestone as raw materials.

May 1 – National Chocolate Parfait Day

Posted on May 1, 2016

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Happy National Chocolate Parfait Day!

Five Food Finds about Parfait: 

  1. Dark chocolate has more antioxidants than green tea and just as many as blueberries.
  2. White chocolate really isn’t chocolate. It’s made from cocoa butter, the substance you get by pressing cocoa beans. Cocoa butter is absent of the cocoa solids used to make chocolate.
  3. Chocolate was consumed by the ancient Aztecs as a frothy beverage, somewhat like hot chocolate we drink today.
  4. Chocolate comes from a plant, called Theobroma cacao, which translates “Food of the Gods”.
  5. Eating chocolate can also reduce the symptoms of stress.

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1683 Supposedly, a patent for a system of extracting salt from sea water was granted in England.

1841 The first wagon train left Independence, Missouri for California.

1851 London’s Great Exhibition opened in Hyde Park. It was the first international exhibition ever to be held. The Exhibition was housed in the Crystal Palace.

1889 Bayer introduced aspirin powder in Germany.

1927 Imperial Airways became the first British airline to serve hot meals.

1931 Empire State Building opens. It was built on the site of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel

1971 ‘Brown Sugar’ by the Rolling Stones is released.

1991 Charles Elton died. Elton was an English biologist who first developed the idea of a ‘food chain.’

2001 Hindus in Seattle filled suit against McDonald’s restaurant chain for not disclosing the use of beef flavoring in its French Fries.

2005 A 9 foot, 640 pound freshwater catfish was caught by fishermen in northern Thailand on the Mekong River. According to many, this is the largest freshwater fish ever caught.

 

April 23 is National Picnic Day

Posted on April 23, 2016

 

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Here are today’s five things to know about Picnic

  1. Did you know that a “picnic” ham is really not a true ham? It is cut from the upper part of the foreleg of a pig – a true ham is cut from the hind leg.
  2. Italy’s favourite picnic day is Easter Monday. It is called “Angel’s Monday” or Pasquetta (“Little Easter”).
  3. After an ant has visited your picinc, it lays down a scent as it returns to the nest for the other ants to follow!
  4. In the year 2000, a 600-mile-long picnic took place in France to celebrate the first Bastille Day of the new millennium.
  5. The first table designed specifically for picnics (in a style similar to what we know today) appeared in the late 1800s.

Fun Fact:

In the first half of the 19th century, a Picnic Society met in London at the Pantheon, a place of public entertainment in Oxford Street.

The French started the modern fashion for picnics when they opened their royal parks to the public after the revolution of 1789.

The 1955 film Picnic, with William Holden and Kim Novak, was nominated for six Oscars and won two for best art direction and best film editing.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1564 and 1616 William Shakespeare was born. He passed away on the same date 52 years later. There are many references to food in Shakespeare’s works. “Let the sky rain potatoes.” (‘The Merry Wives of Windsor’). “Tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers.” (‘Romeo and Juliet’).
  • 1895 Purdy and Peters were issued a patent for a “design for spoons.”
  • 1947 Glenn Cornick of the music group ‘Jethro Tull’ was born.
  • 1982 The Conch Republic (Key West & the Florida Keys) seceded from the United States to protest an INS (Immigration & Naturalization Service) roadblock on the only road into the Keys.
  • 1985 Coca-Cola announced it was changing its 99 year old secret formula. New Coke was a big flop.
  • 1992 The first McDonald’s in Beijing, China opened. It is the world’s largest McDonald’s, with 28,000 square feet, seating for 700 and 1,000 employees.
  • 1993 R.I.P. Cesar Chavez. He was the founder of the United Farm Workers Union.

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