Posts tagged “news

March 29 is National Chiffon Cake Day

Posted on March 29, 2015

mmmmsugar.com

mmmmsugar.com

Many believe Chiffon cake is the ‘original’ wedding cake filling. A chiffon cake is a very light cake made with vegetable oil, eggs, sugar, flour, baking powder, and flavorings.  It is a combination of both batter and foam type cakes.  The lack of butter means that chiffon cakes lack much of the rich flavor of butter cakes, and hence they are typically served accompanied with flavorful sauces or other accompaniments, such as chocolate or fruit fillings.

Here are today’s five thing to know about Chiffon Cake:

  • Cooking Tip: To get the most lemon flavor in a recipe, use the rind instead of the juice.  It contains the lemon oils.
  • Lemons are hybrids; first cultivated in the middle ages, it is a mix of wild limes and citrons.
  • Generally, Lemons grown in more arid areas have more acid in them while those grown in wetter climates are sweeter,less acidic.
  • Lemonade was a favorite of Chinese emperors long before its modern popularity in Western culture.
  • Due to its high acidity, lemon juice is often used as a cleaning agent.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

1886 Coca-Cola was created by Dr. John Pemberton.

1900 Charles Elton was born.  Elton was an English biologist who first developed the idea of a ‘food chain.’

1848 A huge upstream ice jam stopped almost all water flow over Niagara Falls (both American Falls and the Canadian Horseshoe Falls) for several hours.  You could actually walk out into the riverbed below the falls.

1903 R.I.P. Gustavus Franklin Swift.  Founder of the meat-packing business Swift & Co., the inventor of the refrigerated railway car, and the first to ship ‘dressed’ beef to eastern markets instead of live animals.

1980 R.I.P. Walter H. Deubener. He owned the S.S. Kresge grocery store in St. Paul, Minnesota and invented the handled grocery bag.

March 28 is National Black Forest Cake Day

Posted on March 28, 2015

mybestrecipes.eu

mybestrecipes.eu

Here are today’s five thing to know about Black Forest Cake:

  1. Typically, Black Forest cake consists of several layers of chocolate cake, with whipped cream and cherries between each layer.
  2. In some European traditions sour cherries are used both between the layers and for decorating the top.
  3. Traditionally, Kirschwasser (a clear liquor distilled from tart cherries) is added to the cake, although other liquors are also used
  4. The cake is named not directly after the Black Forest (Schwarzwald) mountain range in southwestern Germany but rather from the specialty liquor of that region, known as Schwarzwälder Kirsch(wasser) and distilled from tart cherries.
  5. Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte was first mentioned in writing in 1934.

Fun Fact:

The record for the world’s largest authentic black forest cake, weighing 3000 kg, was set at Europa Park, Germany on 16 July 2006, by K&D Bakery.

In the history of black forest cake, it was not in the form of a cake but instead as a dessert recipe.

The forests in “Hansel and Gretel”, “Snow White”, and “Rapunzel” are based on the Black Forest. They are all German fairy tales.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1797 The first U.S. patent for a ‘washing machine’ was issued (possibly to Nathaniel Briggs).  It was called a scrub board or wash board.
  • 1819 Sir Joseph William Bazalgette was born.  A British civil engineer, he designed the main sewer system for London.
  • 1897 Victor Mills was born.  He was a chemical engineer who worked for Proctor & Gamble.  He improved Duncan Hines cake mixes, improved Jif peanut butter, and invented Pampers disposable diapers.
  • 1968 ‘Whiskey On A Sunday’ was recorded by the Irish Rovers.
  • 1996 John Leonard submitted an order form along with ‘Pepsi Points’ and a check to Pepsi for a Harrier Jump Jet.  The Harrier had been featured in a Pepsi commercial as one of the items that could be redeemed for ‘points,’ or a combination of cash and points. Pepsi subsequently refused to send Leonard the Harrier Jump Jet (actual cost: $23 million).  Leonard then sued, and finally a judge ruled that the Harrier Jump Jet had obviously been mentioned in the promotion as a joke.

dvdr1 2

March 24 is National Cake Pop Day

Posted on March 24, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Cake Pop:

  1. A cake pop is cake, baked in an appealing shape, hand dipped in frosting,  and decorated to taste, all on a stick to be eaten as candy.
  2. While there is no recorded date for the creation of cake pops. Most people say that Bakerella, a popular baking blog, helped make then a “pop” phenomenon.See Pinterest below
  3. In 2011, cake pops were considered the newest and most popular confectionery food trends
  4. Other variations of cake pops are  cake balls, cakesicles, cupcake pops, and cake-on-a-stick.
  5. Cake pops in recent years have become ubiquitous to Starbucks coffee shops.

* Bakerella celebrates National Cake Pop Day on Feb 1

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

      • 1765 The British Parliament passed the Quartering Act, which required American colonists to provide temporary quarters, food, drink, etc. to British troops stationed in their towns.
      • 1896 Clement Hardy received a patent for the rotary disk plow.
      • 1989 The worst oil spill in U.S. history (up to that point) occurred as the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Alaska’s Prince William Sound, and eventually leaked 11 million gallons of crude oil.  The effects on wildlife and fish was devastating.
      • 1990 R.I.P. Cookbook author Jane Grigson, age 61.

March 29 is National Chiffon Cake Day

Posted on March 29, 2014

National Chiffon Cake Day

Many believe Chiffon cake is the ‘original’ wedding cake filling. A chiffon cake is a very light cake made with vegetable oil, eggs, sugar, flour, baking powder, and flavorings.  It is a combination of both batter and foam type cakes.  The lack of butter means that chiffon cakes lack much of the rich flavor of butter cakes, and hence they are typically served accompanied with flavorful sauces or other accompaniments, such as chocolate or fruit fillings.

Five Food Finds about Lemons

  • Cooking Tip: To get the most lemon flavor in a recipe, use the rind instead of the juice.  It contains the lemon oils.
  • Lemons are hybrids; first cultivated in the middle ages, it is a mix of wild limes and citrons.
  • Generally, Lemons grown in more arid areas have more acid in them while those grown in wetter climates are sweeter,less acidic.
  • Lemonade was a favorite of Chinese emperors long before its modern popularity in Western culture.
  • Due to its high acidity, lemon juice is often used as a cleaning agent.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1886 Coca-Cola was created by Dr. John Pemberton.

1900 Charles Elton was born.  Elton was an English biologist who first developed the idea of a ‘food chain.’

1848 A huge upstream ice jam stopped almost all water flow over Niagara Falls (both American Falls and the Canadian Horseshoe Falls) for several hours.  You could actually walk out into the riverbed below the falls.

1903 R.I.P. Gustavus Franklin Swift.  Founder of the meat-packing business Swift & Co., the inventor of the refrigerated railway car, and the first to ship ‘dressed’ beef to eastern markets instead of live animals.

1980 R.I.P. Walter H. Deubener. He owned the S.S. Kresge grocery store in St. Paul, Minnesota and invented the handled grocery bag.

March 28 is National Black Forest Cake Day

Posted on March 28, 2014

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Interesting Food Facts about Black Forest Cake

  1. Typically, Black Forest cake consists of several layers of chocolate cake, with whipped cream and cherries between each layer.
  2. In some European traditions sour cherries are used both between the layers and for decorating the top.
  3. Traditionally, Kirschwasser (a clear liquor distilled from tart cherries) is added to the cake, although other liquors are also used
  4. The cake is named not directly after the Black Forest (Schwarzwald) mountain range in southwestern Germany but rather from the specialty liquor of that region, known as Schwarzwälder Kirsch(wasser) and distilled from tart cherries.
  5. Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte was first mentioned in writing in 1934.

Fun Fact:

The record for the world’s largest authentic black forest cake, weighing 3000 kg, was set at Europa Park, Germany on 16 July 2006, by K&D Bakery.

In the history of black forest cake, it was not in the form of a cake but instead as a dessert recipe.

The forests in “Hansel and Gretel”, “Snow White”, and “Rapunzel” are based on the Black Forest. They are all German fairy tales.

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1797 The first U.S. patent for a ‘washing machine’ was issued (possibly to Nathaniel Briggs).  It was called a scrub board or wash board.
  • 1819 Sir Joseph William Bazalgette was born.  A British civil engineer, he designed the main sewer system for London.
  • 1897 Victor Mills was born.  He was a chemical engineer who worked for Proctor & Gamble.  He improved Duncan Hines cake mixes, improved Jif peanut butter, and invented Pampers disposable diapers.
  • 1968 ‘Whiskey On A Sunday’ was recorded by the Irish Rovers.
  • 1996 John Leonard submitted an order form along with ‘Pepsi Points’ and a check to Pepsi for a Harrier Jump Jet.  The Harrier had been featured in a Pepsi commercial as one of the items that could be redeemed for ‘points,’ or a combination of cash and points. Pepsi subsequently refused to send Leonard the Harrier Jump Jet (actual cost: $23 million).  Leonard then sued, and finally a judge ruled that the Harrier Jump Jet had obviously been mentioned in the promotion as a joke.

dvdr1 2

March 24 is National Cake Pop Day

Posted on March 24, 2014

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Interesting Food Facts about Cake Pops

  1. A cake pop is cake, baked in an appealing shape, hand dipped in frosting,  and decorated to taste, all on a stick to be eaten as candy.
  2. While there is no recorded date for the creation of cake pops. Most people say that Bakerella, a popular baking blog, helped make then a “pop” phenomenon.See Pinterest below
  3. In 2011, cake pops were considered the newest and most popular confectionery food trends
  4. Other variations of cake pops are  cake balls, cakesicles, cupcake pops, and cake-on-a-stick.
  5. Cake pops in recent years have become ubiquitous to Starbucks coffee shops.

* Bakerella celebrates National Cake Pop Day on Feb 1

Foodimentary’s cake pops pics.

Our pinterest cake pops pictures.

Today’s Food History

      • 1765 The British Parliament passed the Quartering Act, which required American colonists to provide temporary quarters, food, drink, etc. to British troops stationed in their towns.
      • 1896 Clement Hardy received a patent for the rotary disk plow.
      • 1989 The worst oil spill in U.S. history (up to that point) occurred as the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Alaska’s Prince William Sound, and eventually leaked 11 million gallons of crude oil.  The effects on wildlife and fish was devastating.
      • 1990 R.I.P. Cookbook author Jane Grigson, age 61.

A History of Frozen Food

Posted on March 7, 2014

Clarence Birdseye invented, developed, and commercialized a method for quick-freezing food products in convenient packages and without altering the original taste. “Frosted foods” were sold to the public for the first time in 1930 in Springfield, Massachusetts, under the tradename Birds Eye Frosted Foods®. While Clarence Birdseye has become a household name, his process has evolved into a multi-billion dollar industry.

Fruits and vegetables chosen for fresh produces isles are usually picked before they ripen, which gives them less time to reach higher amounts of vitamins and minerals. The appearance of ‘ripening’ still occurs, but this produce will never have the same nutritive value as if they had been allowed to fully ripen on the plant.

Clarence Birdseye was born in 1886 in Brooklyn, New York A taxidermist by trade, but a chef at heart, Clarence Birdseye wished his family could have fresh food all year. After observing the people of the Arctic preserving fresh fish and meat in barrels of sea water quickly frozen by the arctic temperatures, he concluded that it was the rapid freezing in the extremely low temperatures that made food retain freshness when thawed and cooked months later.

In 1923, with an investment of $7 for an electric fan, buckets of brine, and cakes of ice, Clarence Birdseye invented and later perfected a system of packing fresh food into waxed cardboard boxes and flash-freezing under high pressure.  The Goldman-Sachs Trading Corporation and the Postum Company (later the General Foods Corporation) bought Clarence Birdseye’s patents and trademarks in 1929 for $22 million. The first quick-frozen vegetables, fruits, seafoods, and meat.

Clarence Birdseye turned his attention to other interests and invented an infrared heat lamp, a spotlight for store window displays, a harpoon for marking whales, then established companies to market his products.

Nutritional Five Food Finds about Frozen Food

  • Fruits and vegetables tend to be frozen at their peak ripeness, a time when they have the most nutrients.
  • Pumpkins and tomatoes lose little nutritional value during the freezing process.
  • When shopping for frozen foods, choose those marked with the USDA ‘U.S. Fancy’ shield.  Vegetables of this standard tend to be more nutrient-rich than the lower grades ‘U.S. No. 1’ or ‘U.S. No. 2.’
  • Steaming or microwaving (instead of boiling) frozen foods minimizes the loss of vitamins & nutrients.
  • Frozen produce sales have climbed faster than fresh produce sales over the past five years.

 

National Sloppy Joe Day

Posted on March 18, 2013

National Sloppy Joe Day

Five Food Finds about Sloppy Joes

  • Most believe the sloppy joe was first served in Havannah Cuba at the bar and café “Sloppy Joe’s” in the early 1900’s.
  • The sloppy joe goes by many names, including manwich, slush burger, yum yums,barbecue, dynamite, and even sloppy jane.
  • “Sloppy Joe’s” were mentioned in several movies of the 1930’s, Citizen Kane and even It’s a Wonderful Life. Even though it was not  widely popular until the 1960’s.
  • In 1969, Hunt’s revolutionized the Sloppy Joe when it introduced its Manwich Sloppy Joe Sauce.
  • Many say that a cook named Joe in Sioux City, Iowa, in the 1920′ created a sandwich of  “loose meat” served in bread, a “sloppy’ Joe

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1863 Women rioted in Salisbury, North Carolina, to protest the lack of flour and salt in the Confederacy.

1925 ‘Tea for Two’ was recorded by Binnie Hale & the Palace Theater Orchestra.

1946 The Andrews Sisters recorded ‘Avocado’

1966  RIP Hedda Hopper, Gossip columnist. Her famous Quote: “Having only friends [and no enemies] would be dull….like eating eggs without salt.”

March 29 – National Chiffon Cake Day

Posted on March 29, 2012

National Chiffon Cake Day

Many believe Chiffon cake is the ‘original’ wedding cake filling. A chiffon cake is a very light cake made with vegetable oil, eggs, sugar, flour, baking powder, and flavorings.  It is a combination of both batter and foam type cakes.  The lack of butter means that chiffon cakes lack much of the rich flavor of butter cakes, and hence they are typically served accompanied with flavorful sauces or other accompaniments, such as chocolate or fruit fillings.

Five Food Finds about Lemons

  • Cooking Tip: To get the most lemon flavor in a recipe, use the rind instead of the juice.  It contains the lemon oils.
  • Lemons are hybrids; first cultivated in the middle ages, it is a mix of wild limes and citrons.
  • Generally, Lemons grown in more arid areas have more acid in them while those grown in wetter climates are sweeter,less acidic.
  • Lemonade was a favorite of Chinese emperors long before its modern popularity in Western culture.
  • Due to its high acidity, lemon juice is often used as a cleaning agent.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1886 Coca-Cola was created by Dr. John Pemberton.

1900 Charles Elton was born.  Elton was an English biologist who first developed the idea of a ‘food chain.’

1848 A huge upstream ice jam stopped almost all water flow over Niagara Falls (both American Falls and the Canadian Horseshoe Falls) for several hours.  You could actually walk out into the riverbed below the falls.

1903 R.I.P. Gustavus Franklin Swift.  Founder of the meat-packing business Swift & Co., the inventor of the refrigerated railway car, and the first to ship ‘dressed’ beef to eastern markets instead of live animals.

1980 R.I.P. Walter H. Deubener. He owned the S.S. Kresge grocery store in St. Paul, Minnesota and invented the handled grocery bag.

Black Forest Cake a German tradition since 1935

Posted on March 28, 2012

Black forest cake

National Black Forest Cake

Did you know:

  • Typically, Black Forest cake consists of several layers of chocolate cake, with whipped cream and cherries between each layer.
  • In some European traditions sour cherries are used both between the layers and for decorating the top.
  • Traditionally, Kirschwasser (a clear liquor distilled from tart cherries) is added to the cake, although other liquors are also used
  • The cake is named not directly after the Black Forest (Schwarzwald) mountain range in southwestern Germany but rather from the specialty liquor of that region, known as Schwarzwälder Kirsch(wasser) and distilled from tart cherries.
  • Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte was first mentioned in writing in 1934.

March 27 – World Whisky Day

Posted on March 27, 2012

World Whisky Day

Five Food Finds about Whisky

  • Whisky and whiskey are actually the same liquor.  In American-English and Irish-English, it is spelled “whiskey”.  In British-English, it is spelled “whisky”.
  • A whisky stops maturing after it is bottled.
  • The dark color of whisky comes from the wooden barrels in which it is aged. The wood expands and contracts with the change in temperature, making the movie in and out of the wood. The compounds from wood give whisky its dark color.
  • There are more than 5000 types of Single Malt Whisky.
  • The barrels made from American White Oak have been claimed to produce the tastiest whisky.

Daily Quote

“I always carry a flask of whisky in case of snakebite… and furthermore, always carry a small snake.”  -W.C. Fields

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1860 M.L. Byrn patented a new and improved corkscrew.

1901 Carl Barks was born.  He worked for Disney Studios and illustrated Donald Duck comics.

1923 R.I.P. Sir James Dewar.  He invented the ‘Dewar Flask,’ the original ‘thermos bottle’.

1958 Sheb Wooley recorded ‘Purple People Eater’ on this day.

2001 China reported that its population is now 1.26 Billion.

For more information, check out WorldWhiskyDay.com

March 26 – National Nougat Day

Posted on March 26, 2012

National Nougat Day

Five Food Finds about Nougat

  • 3 Muskateer bars, one of the most popular nougat candy bars of the 20th century, originally consisted of three flavors: chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry.  During WWII rationing, they were limited to vanilla flavoring, & they remain this way today.
  • Nougat is commonly found in candy bars; Milky Way, 3 Muskateers, Snickers, Polar, etc.
  • Today’s nougat is a mixture of sucrose and corn syrup with a whipping agent to create its fluffy texture.
  • Nougat was put in candy bars to resemble the texture and flavor of ice cream.  This is why early candy bars with nougat were commonly served frozen.
  • The word nougat comes from Occitan (a southern French dialect) pan nogat, from nux gatum, which means nutbread.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1753 Benjamin Thompson, Count von Rumford was born.  American physician who invented the percolator, a pressure cooker and a kitchen stove.  He is frequently credited with creating the dessert, Baked Alaska.

1937 The cities of Dilley, Texas, and Crystal City, Texas each erected a statue of Popeye, the cartoon character.

1996 David Packard died.  Founder with William Hewlett of Hewlett Packard Company.  Before they became famous for computers and printers etc., some of their early inventions were an automatic urinal flusher and a weight loss shock machine!

A History of Aunt Jemima

Posted on March 25, 2012

Aunt Jemima’s pancake mix was one of the first “mixes” ever sold (from the R.T. Davis Milling Company). Former slave Nancy Green was hired as a spokesperson for the Aunt Jemima pancake mix in 1890. Green  played the Jemima character from 1890 until 1923. The world first “discovered” the real Aunt Jemima (Green)  at the World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, 1893, where she would make pancakes. Today, most of us know her from the kindly portrait on the label of the American iconic syrup and mixes.

Five Food Finds about Aunt Jemima

  • Most people think of the Aunt Jemima brand as a syrup, but it actually wasn’t introduced as a syrup until 1966.
  • Some view Aunt Jemima as a negative racial stereotype.  Throughout the years, the brand has done some work to create a more empowering image of her.
  • Aunt Jemima’s pancake mix was one of the first “mixes” ever sold.
  • At the World’s Columbian Exposition, Aunt Jemima’ (Nancy Green) demonstrated how to use the new mix.  The exhibit was so popular, police had to control the crowds at the Aunt Jemima booth.
  • Aunt Jemima was the first pancake mix available, and it continues to be one of the best-selling in the world.

 

March 24 – National Cake Pop Day

Posted on March 24, 2012

National Cake Pop Day

Also: National Chocolate Covered Raisins Day

Five Food Finds about Cake Pops

  • A cake pop is cake, baked in an appealing shape, hand dipped in frosting,  and decorated to taste, all on a stick to be eaten as candy.
  • While there is no recorded date for the creation of cake pops. Most people say that Bakerella, a popular baking blog, helped make then a “pop” phenomenon.See Pinterest below
  • In 2011, cake pops were considered the newest and most popular confectionery food trends
  • Other variations of cake pops are  cake balls, cakesicles, cupcake pops, and cake-on-a-stick.
  • Cake pops in recent years have become ubiquitous to Starbucks coffee shops.
* Bakerella celebrates National Cake Pop Day on Feb 1

Foodimentary’s cake pops pics.

Our pinterest cake pops pictures.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1765 The British Parliament passed the Quartering Act, which required American colonists to provide temporary quarters, food, drink, etc. to British troops stationed in their towns.

1896 Clement Hardy received a patent for the rotary disk plow.

1989 The worst oil spill in U.S. history (up to that point) occurred as the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Alaska’s Prince William Sound, and eventually leaked 11 million gallons of crude oil.  The effects on wildlife and fish was devastating.

1990 R.I.P. Cookbook author Jane Grigson, age 61.

A History of Frozen Food

Posted on March 23, 2012

Clarence Birdseye invented, developed, and commercialized a method for quick-freezing food products in convenient packages and without altering the original taste. “Frosted foods” were sold to the public for the first time in 1930 in Springfield, Massachusetts, under the tradename Birds Eye Frosted Foods®. While Clarence Birdseye has become a household name, his process has evolved into a multi-billion dollar industry. Fruits and vegetables chosen for fresh produces isles are usually picked before they ripen, which gives them less time to reach higher amounts of vitamins and minerals. The appearance of ‘ripening’ still occurs, but this produce will never have the same nutritive value as if they had been allowed to fully ripen on the plant. Clarence Birdseye was born in 1886 in Brooklyn, New…

March 23 – National Chips and Dip Day

Posted on March 23, 2012

National Chip and Dip Day

Five Food Finds about Chips & Dip

Chip/Dip pairings in order of popularity:

  1. Tortilla Chips and Salsa
  2. Tortilla Chips and Queso/Bean/Guacamole (a second place tie!)
  3. Potato Chips and French Onion Dip
  4. Chips and Artichoke Dip
  5. Pita Chips and Hummus

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1699 John Bartram was born.  American naturalist and explorer, considered ‘father of American botany’; established a world renowned botanical garden in Philadelphia in 1728.

1857 Fannie Merritt Farmer was born.  American culinary authority, and author of the 1896 edition of ‘The Boston Cooking School Cook Book‘ which became known in future editions as the ‘Fannie Farmer Cook Book.’  Director of the Boston Cooking School, and founder of Miss Farmer’s School of Cookery.  She is often cited as the first cookbook author to introduce standard measurements.

1880 A patent for a glass milk bottle was issued to Warren Glass Works.

1912 The Dixie Cup was developed by Lawrence Luellen and Hugh Moore.  Its original name was the ‘Health Kup,’ changed to ‘Dixie Cup‘ in 1919.  The name came from a line of dolls made by the Dixie Doll Company.

2008 R.I.P. Al Copeland, the founder of Popeye’s restaurant chain.

An Overview of Drinking Water

Posted on March 22, 2012

Drinking water or potable water is water pure enough to be consumed or used with low risk of immediate or long term harm. In most developed countries, the water supplied to households, commerce and industry is all of drinking water standard, even though only a very small proportion is actually consumed or used in food preparation. Typical uses include washing or landscape irrigation. Over large parts of the world, humans have inadequate access to potable water and use sources contaminated with disease vectors, pathogens or unacceptable levels of toxins or suspended solids. Drinking or using such water in food preparation leads to widespread acute and chronic illnesses and is a major cause of death and misery in many countries. Reduction of waterborne diseases is…

March 22 – World Water Day

Posted on March 22, 2012

World Water Day

Five Food Finds about Water

  • Over 70 percent of an adult’s body is made up of water.
  • The recommended daily intake of water is 8 cups per day, but it can come through the consumption of food as well.
  • There’s more fresh water stored under the ground in aquifers than on the earth’s surface.
  • Drinking too much water too quickly causes water intoxication, caused by reduced sodium (salt) levels in the blood stream.  Some confuse this with a “runner’s high”.
  • Of all the water on the earth, humans can use about three tenths of a percent of it for drinking water.

Daily Quote

“My fake plants died because I didn’t pretend to water them.”

-Mitch Hedberg

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1841 Cornstarch was patented by Orlando Jones in England.

1960 R.I.P. Agnes Arber the British botanist who wrote ‘Herbals: Their Origin and Evolution‘ (1912) and ‘The Gramineae: A Study of Cereal, Bamboo and Grass‘ (1934).

1975 ‘Lady Marmalade’ by LaBelle is #1 on the charts.  (Marmalade is a French name for Jam or Jelly.)

March 21 – National French Bread Day

Posted on March 21, 2012

National French Bread Day

also:

National California Strawberry Day

Five Food Finds about French Bread

  • French national law dictates that ‘French’ bread should contain only combinations of flour, yeast, salt and water.
  • French bread is a simple low-fat white flour bread, which is baked into long slender loaves called baguettes.
  • Most baguettes are around 2-3’ in length, and 3-5” in thickness.
  • While a regular baguette is made with a direct addition of baker’s yeast, it is not unusual for artisan-style loaves to be made with a poolish, “biga” or other bread pre-ferments to increase flavor complexity and other characteristics.
  • Outside France, baguettes are also made with other doughs; for example, the Vietnamese bánh mì uses a high proportion of rice flour, while many North American bakeries make whole wheat, multigrain, and sourdough baguettes alongside French-style loaves.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1925 Teaching the theory of evolution became illegal in Tennessee.

1984 A section of Central Park is renamed ‘Strawberry Fields’ to honor John Lennon.

1994 Due to bad harvests, there is a shortage of Japanese grown rice.  Japan’s Imperial Palace begins serving royal meals to the Emperor & Empress with rice grown in the U.S., China and Thailand.

1999 Bertrand Piccard and Brian Jones landed in the Egyptian desert, having completed the 1st ‘Around the World’ hot air balloon flight.  According to the BBC, they carried fresh food, including bread, cheese and pre-cooked steaks to last for 6 or 7 days, after which they made due with dried foods such as cereals and powdered milk.  The flight began in the Swiss Alps, took 19 days, 21 hours and 55 minutes, and covered 29,056 non-stop miles.

A History of the Baguette

Posted on March 21, 2012

The word itself was not used to refer to a type of bread until apparently 1920, but what is now known as “baguette” may have existed well before that. Though the baguette today is often considered one of the symbols of French culture viewed from abroad, the association of France with long loaves predates any mention of it. Long, if wide, loaves had been made since the time of Louis XIV, long thin ones since the mid-eighteenth century and in fact by the nineteenth century some were far longer than the baguette: “loaves of bread six feet long that look like crowbars!” (1862); “Housemaids were hurrying homewards with their purchases for various Gallic breakfasts, and the long sticks of bread, a yard or two…

Taco Bell: A History in Pictures

Posted on March 21, 2012

A History of Taco Bell

Posted on March 21, 2012

Everyone’s probably  eaten at Taco Bell, but did you know the “Bell” came from the founder’s name, Glenn Bell?  He pioneered the sale of crunchy tacos to the world over 50 years ago.  The first Taco Bell opened March 21, 1962. Taco Bell Begins Glenn, a 23-year-old former Marine, arrived in San Bernadino, California, just after World War II.  He opened a one man hot dog stand, but was interested in mexican food.  He wanted a quick way to grab Mexican food on the go. He first started selling hot dogs paired with a sauce that would later become Taco Bell’s hot sauce.  Soon, he experimented with ways to prepare tacos quickly and efficiently. He also had the novel idea of frying the taco…

March 21 – National Crunchy Taco Day

Posted on March 20, 2012

National Crunchy Taco Day

In celebration of Taco Bell’s 50+ years.

Five Food Finds about Taco Bell

  • Founder, Glenn Bell, first opened the chain “Del Tacos,” a hot dog and taco franchise.
  • He was the first to fry his taco shells in advance.  Before then, they were fried on demand.
  • They were the first fast food chain to have move tie-in promotions.
  • In 1962, a tacos only cost 19 cents.
  • Even though the 1990 Chihuahua was an advertising phenomenon, taco sales actually went down during that period.

A History of Chef Boyardee

Posted on March 20, 2012

Chef Boyardee was, in fact, a real person.  Born Ettore (Hector) Boiardi, Chef Boyardee was a real man and a real chef (unlike Mrs. Butterworth or Betty Crocker). There has even been an internet rumor denying his existence, claiming that “Boyardee” was combination of the names of three food company executives; Boyd, Art and Dennis. Hector Boiardi was born in Piacenza, in northern Italy. When he was sixteen, he immigrated to the United States (through Ellis Island) to join his brother who was working as a waiter in New York’s Plaza Hotel restaurant. While working in West Virginia’s prestigious Greenbrier Resort, Chef Boiardi supervised the catering for president Woodrow Wilson’s wedding. On December 18, 1915, Chef Boiardi supervised the catering for President Wilson’s second…

March 20 – National Ravioli Day

Posted on March 20, 2012

National Ravioli Day

Five Food Finds about Ravioli

  • The first mentions of Ravioli was in the 14th century Venus.
  • The word ravioli is from an old Italian word riavvolgere (“to wrap”)
  • Canned ravioli was pioneered by Chef Boyardee in the 1930’s
  • “Fresh” packed ravioli lasts up for several week while fresh made lasts for just a few days.
  •  Italian tradition  is to serve vegetarian ravioli, particularly on Fridays. Meats is served as a side or later in the meal.

Daily Quote

“No man is lonely eating spaghetti; it requires so much attention.”

Christopher Morley

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1602 The Dutch East India Company was established and the Netherlands granted it a monopoly on trade with Asia.

1727  RIP Sir Isaac Newton It is said that an apple fell on his head inspired his theory of universal gravitation.  The apple is thought to have been the green skinned ‘Flower of Kent’ variety.

1932 RIP Ilya Ivanovich Ivanov,a Soviet biologist.  Others had previously shown it was possible to artificially inseminate domestic animals, Ivanov developed the practical procedures in 1901.

1941 ‘All That Meat And No Potatoes’ was recorded by jazz musician Fats Waller.

The History of Quaker Oatmeal

Posted on March 19, 2012

Quaker Oats was founded in 1901 by the merger of four oat mills:
The Quaker Mill Company of Ravenna, Ohio, which held the trademark on the Quaker name and was founded by Henry Parsons Crowell, who bought the bankrupt Quaker Oat Mill Company, also in Ravenna.  He was holding the key positions between the general manager, president and chairman of the company from 1888 until late 1943. He was called the cereal tycoon.  He donated more than 70% of his wealth to the Crowell Trust.
A cereal mill in Cedar Rapids, Iowa owned by John Stuart, his son Robert Stuart, and their partner George Douglas;
The German Mills American Oatmeal Company, owned by “The Oatmeal King”, Ferdinand Schumacher of Akron, Ohio;
The Rob Lewis & Co. American Oats and Barley Oatmeal Corporation. Formally known as “Good For Breakfast” instant oatmeal mix.
The company expanded into numerous areas, including other breakfast cereals and other food and drink products, and even into unrelated fields such as toys.
In 1969, Quaker acquired Fisher-Price, a toy company and spun it off in 1991.

Quaker Oats’ “Chewy Yogourt” Granola bars (available in Canada)
In the 1970s, the company financed the making of the film Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory, obtaining in return a licence to use a number of the product names mentioned in the movie for candy bars.
In 1982 Quaker Oats formed US Games, a company that created games for the Atari 5200. After one year they went out of business.
In 1983, Quaker bought Stokely-Van Camp, Inc., makers of Van Camp’s and Gatorade.
Quaker bought Snapple for $1.7 billion in 1994 and sold it to Triarc in 1997 for $300 million.  Triarc sold it to Cadbury Schweppes for $1.45 billion in September 2000.  It was spun off in May 2008 to its current owners, Dr Pepper Snapple Group.
In 1996, Quaker spun off its frozen food business, selling it to Aurora Foods (which was bought by Pinnacle Foods in 2004).
In August 2001, Quaker was bought out by Pepsico because Pepsi wanted to add Gatorade to its arsenal of beverages and thus break into the isotonic sports beverage market. The merger created the fourth-largest consumer goods company in the world. Though the main prize for PepsiCo was Gatorade noncarbonated sports drink, Quaker’s cereal and snack food division serves as seemingly healthier complement to the existing Frito-Lay salty-snacks division.
Since the late 1980s, actor Wilford Brimley has appeared in television commercials extolling the virtues of oat consumption, typically to a young child, as to introduce the concept of oatmeal consumption as a long tradition.

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