Posts tagged “November food holidays

November 1st is National Bison Day!

Posted on November 1, 2017

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Here are today’s five things to know about Bison:

Bison are also called Buffalo.

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The American bison and the European wisent are the largest terrestrial animals in North America and Europe.

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A bison’s hump is composed of muscle, supported by long vertebrae. It allows the animal to use its head to plow through snow.

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Fossils and accounts from early travelers show that Yellowstone National Park is the only place in the U.S. where bison have lived continuously since prehistoric times.

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The Yellowstone herd is one of the few that remains genetically free of cattle genes.


Today’s Food History

  • 1798 Sir Benjamin Lee Guinness was born. He was the son of Arthur Guinness, and joined the family brewing business. When his father died, he became sole owner and built up the business. He was also elected Lord Mayor of Dublin in 1851.
  • 1841 The first wagon of settlers left Independence, Missouri for the trip to California.
  • 1962 Antony Kiedis of the music group ‘Red Hot Chili Peppers’ was born.
  • 1997 Victor Mills died. He was a chemical engineer who worked for Proctor & Gamble. Among his many accomplishments, he improved Duncan Hines cake mix, and Jif peanut butter, and invented Pampers disposable diapers.
  • 2009 The last issue of Gourmet magazine was published this month.

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November 29 is National Chocolates Day

Posted on November 29, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Chocolates:

  1. Chocolate comes from the Aztec word “xocolatl” which means “bitter water”.
  2. Switzerland is one of the top countries for chocolate consumption. The Swiss consume about 22 lbs of chocolate, per person, per year.
  3. Cocoa beans were used as currency by the Mayan and Aztec cultures. Perhaps this is where they saying “Money grows on trees” came from.
  4. Allowing chocolate to melt in your mouth produces the same or even stronger reactions as passionately kissing.
  5. Most cocoa comes from West Africa.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

Today’s Food History

  • 1627 John Ray (Wray) was born. A leading 17th century English naturalist and botanist. He contributed to the advancement of taxonomy, and established the species as the basic unit of taxonomy.
  • 1968 The Who release ‘The Who Sell Out.’ One of my favorite Who albums, with commercials for some real and some fictitious products, including Heinz Baked Beans.
  • 1997 Plastic bags are a serious danger to marine mammals. A 65 foot, 70 ton finback whale died off the coast of Spain. Its digestive tract had been blocked by 30 plastic bags, and several hard plastic objects.
  • 1997 Reports from Chile about giant rats, that had been feeding on the droppings of hormone fattened poultry, were attacking farm animals near Santiago.

 

November 30 is National Mousse Day

Posted on November 30, 2014

recipegreat.com

recipegreat.com

Here are today’s five thing to know about Mousse:

  1. The word mousse is French and translates as “froth” or “foam.”
  2. Cold dessert mousses are often poured into decorative glasses and garnished with fruit, sweet sauces, or whipped cream.
  3. Savory mousses can be made from fish, shellfish, meat, foie gras, etc.
  4. There are three key constituents to a mousse: base, binder, and aerator.
  5. They may be hot or cold and are often squeezed through a piping bag onto some kind of platform to be used as hors d’oeuvres.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1835 Samuel Langhorne Clemens (Mark Twain) was born. American author, pen name Mark Twain, who wrote ‘Tom Sawyer’, ‘Adventures of Huckleberry Finn’, etc. There are many quotes and descriptions about food and dining in his works. An example is: “A man accustomed to American food and American domestic cookery would not starve to death suddenly in Europe, but I think he would gradually waste away, and eventually die.” (From ‘A Tramp Abroad’).
  • 1838 The Great Pastry War.  A brief conflict began between Mexico and France caused by a French pastry cook who claimed that some Mexican Army soldiers had damaged his restaurant. The Mexican government refused to pay for damages. Several other countries had pressed the Mexican government for similar claims in the past due to civil unrest in Mexico.  France decided to do something about it, and sent a fleet to Veracruz and fired on the fortress outside the harbor.  They occupied the city on April 16, 1838, and through the mediation of Great Britain were promised payment of 600,000 pesos for the damages.  They withdrew on March 9, 1839.
  • 1858 John Landis Mason patented the Mason Jar.
  • 1875 A.P. Ashbourne patented a biscuit cutter.
  • 1875 A.J. Ehrrichson patented an oat-crushing machine.
  • 1944 Rob Grill of the music group ‘Grassroots’ was born.
  • 1967 Casimir Funk died. Funk was a Polish-American biochemist who came up with the word ‘vitamine’ later changed to ‘vitamin.’
  • 1983 Alfred Heineken, president of Heinken (the beer) was kidnapped. He was freed after a ransom was paid 3 weeks later.

November 28 is National French Toast Day

Posted on November 28, 2014

communitytable.com

communitytable.com

Here are today’s five thing to know about French Toast:

  1. French toast was not invented in France. In fact, French toast was around long before France even existed as a country.
  2. The earliest reference to doing just this dates all the way back to 4th century Rome, in a cookbook attributed to Apicius, and it is thought to predate this work by a good margin. This style of “French” toast was called Pan Dulcis.
  3. Indeed, the name for French toast in France itself is “pain perdu”, which literally means “lost bread” (it is also called this in Belgium, New Orleans, Acadiana, Newfoundland, and the Congo, among other places).
  4. French toast was created by medieval European cooks who needed to use every bit of food they could find to feed their families.  They knew day-old bread could be revived when moistened and heated.  They also added eggs for additional moisture and protein.
  5. Medieval recipes for French toast suggest this meal was enjoyed by the wealthy.  These recipes used white bread (the very finest, most expensive bread available at the time) with the crusts cut off—something a person of meager means would be unlikely to do.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1837 John Wesley Hyatt was born. He developed the process for making celluloid, the first synthetic plastic. He also invented a water purifying system and a sugar cane mill.
  • 1863 Thanksgiving was first celebrated as a regular American Holiday.
  • 1869 W.F. Semple of Mount Vernon, Ohio, was issued the first chewing gum patent in 1869.
  • 1930 After a sandstorm in Morocco, there was a rain of mud in Paris and yellow sand fell in Spain.
  • 1942 Coffee rationing began in the U.S.
  • 1948 The first Polaroid Land Camera went on sale in Boston. This was the first successful self-developing camera; it took a photo about 1 minute to develop.
  • 2006 Texas Republican state Rep. Betty Brown filed a bill (HCR 15) in the Texas legislature which would declare Athens, Texas as the “original home of the hamburger.” Residents of New Haven, Connecticut strongly objected.

November 27 is National Bavarian Cream Pie Day

Posted on November 27, 2014

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Here are today’s five thing to know about Bavarian Cream Pie:

  1. Bavarian cream was originally a French (or German) cold dessert of egg custard stiffened with gelatin, mixed with whipped cream (sometimes with fruit purée or other flavors), then set in a mold, or used as a filling for cakes and pastries.
  2. No one is sure about the origin of Bavarian cream, but during the late 17th and early 18th centuries many French chefs worked at the court of the Wittelsbach Princes (a German family that ruled Bavaria from the 12th century to 1918).
  3. Before the advent of refrigeration, Bavarian cream represented a culinary triumph. In order to set the dish, the Bavarian cream would have had to be chilled in an ice-filled bowl.
  4. The suffix ‘crème’ in German speaking lands, is the term for the  gelatin mold – (Schokolatencreme, Weincreme, etc.) and there are many variations,  flavored with chocolate, lemon, kirsch, etc.
  5. Escoffier declared that Bavarois would be more properly Moscovite, owing to its preparation, in the days before mechanical refrigeration, by being made in a “hermetically sealed” mold that was plunged into salted, crushed ice to set—hence “Muscovite”.
  6. True Bavarian creams first appeared in the U.S. in Boston Cooking School cookbooks, by Mrs D.A. Lincoln, 1884, and by Fannie Merritt Farmer, 1896. The Fannie Farmer Cookbook offers a “Bavarian Cream”.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1811 Andrew Meikle died. A Scottish millwright, he invented the drum threshing machine.
  • 1826 John Walker invented the friction match (strike anywhere).
  • 1924 The first Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. It was originally called a Christmas Parade.
  • 1944 Musician Eddie Rabbitt was born.
  • 1984 Sylvan N. Goldman died. Goldman ran a successful chain of grocery stores, and while a major owner of the Piggly-Wiggly supermarket chain he invented the shopping cart. He hired fake shoppers to wheel them around the store to encourage his customers to see how useful they could be.

November 24 is National Sardines Day

Posted on November 24, 2014

Here are today’s five thing to know about Sardines:

  1. Sardines live short lives, and grow quite quickly. They can reach a length of about 23cm in two years.
  2. Sardines are the most plentiful edible fish in the world.
  3. The main ingredient in Worcestershire sauce is fermented sardines.
  4. The term sardine was first used in English during the early 15th century and may come from the Mediterranean island of Sardinia, around which sardines were once abundant.
  5. The original ‘secret’ ingredient in Caesar Salad is crushed sardines.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1762 The first written record of the word ‘sandwich’. Edward Gibbons Journal, 11/24/1762: ‘I dined at the Cocoa Tree….That respectable body affords every evening a sight truly English. Twenty or thirty of the first men in the kingdom….supping at little tables….upon a bit of cold meat, or a Sandwich.’
  • 1859 ‘The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection’ was published in England.
  • 1864 Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec was born. French artist who documented Parisian night life in the 1890s with his insightful posters.
  • 1873 Patent issued to Joseph F. Glidden for barbed wire. The beginning of the end of cowboys and the open range.
  • 1916 Sir Hiram Maxim died. An American born inventor. Among his hundreds of inventions were a hair curling iron, a mousetrap, an automatic sprinkling system, gas motors, and a machine gun.

November 23 is National Espresso Day

Posted on November 23, 2014

Here are today’s five thing to know about Espresso:

  1. It takes approximately 42 coffee beans to make an average serving of espresso.
  2. Coffee contains more caffeine than espresso. Strong tasting coffee has no more caffeine than weak-tasting coffee.
  3. Espresso is not referring to a particular type of bean, it is a type of coffee brewing method
  4. Espresso originated in Italy in the early 20th century with Luigi Bezzera, the owner of a manufacturing plant who wanted to speed up the time it took to make coffee.
  5. In the early 1940s, Achille Gaggia created a piston-based espresso machine that improved the taste by eliminating the burnt flavor and giving espresso a thicker consistency.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary Finds

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Today’s Food History

    • 1534 Otto Brunfels died. A German botanist, author of ‘Herbarum vivae eicones’ (‘Living Pictures of Herbs’), one of the first great herbals. His work is considered to be a bridge between ancient and modern botany.
    • 1553 Prospero Alpini was born. An Italian physician and botanist, he is said to have introduced coffee and bananas to Europe and to have been the first to artificially fertilize date palms.
    • 1835 Henry Burden was granted the first U.S. patent for a horseshoe manufacturing machine.
    • 1869 The 3 masted clipper ship ‘Cutty Sark’ was launched at Dunbarton, Scotland. It was one of the last to be built and is the only one surviving today. It is 212 feet long and 36 feet wide. It was initially used in the English/Chinese tea trade. Fully restored in 1957, it is in dry berth in Greenwich, London as a sailing museum.
    • 1894 Donald Deskey was born. An industrial designer, he designed the packaging for Tide laundry detergent and Crest toothpaste among others.
    • 1921 President Harding signs the Willis Campell Act, which prohibits doctors from prescribing beer or liquor.
    • 1945 Wartime rationing ended in the U.S.
    • 1990 Roald Dahl died. British author, one of his most popular books was ‘Charlie and the Chocolate Factory,’ the film version was titled ‘Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory.’ Some of his other books are ‘A Piece of Cake,’ ‘Pig,’ ‘Royal Jelly,’ ‘Smell’ and ‘Lamb to the Slaughter.’
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