Posts tagged “pecan

April 14th is National Pecan Day!

Posted on April 14, 2018

High-res version

Happy National Pecan Day!

Here are today’s five things to know about Pecans:

  • Pecans come in a variety of sizes – mammoth, extra large, large, medium, small and midget.
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  • Before a shelled pecan is ready to be sold, it must first be cleaned, sized, sterilized, cracked and finally, shelled.
pecans-1214697_1920
  • There are over 1,000 varieties of pecans.  Many are named for Native American Indian tribes, including Cheyenne, Mohawk, Sioux, Choctaw and Shawnee.
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  • Texas adopted the pecan tree as its state tree in 1919.
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  • 2 Pecans provide nearly 10 percent of the recommended Daily Value for zinc.

Today’s Food History

  • 1828 The first edition of Noah Webster’s dictionary is copyrighted.
  • 1912 The British luxury liner Titanic struck an iceberg shortly before midnight. It sank at 2:20 a.m. on April 15.
  • 1927 Clarence Birdseye of Massachusetts received a U.K. patent for frozen fish fingers.
  • 1939 ‘The Grapes of Wrath’ by John Steinbeck was published.
  • 1964 Rachel Louise Carson died. An American biologist and author of ‘Silent Spring,’ about environmental pollution, especially the dangers of DDT.
  • 1989 ‘She Drives Me Crazy’ by Fine Young Cannibals is #1 on the charts

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April 14th is National Pecan Day!

Posted on April 14, 2017

High-res version

Here are today’s five things to know about Pecans:

  • Pecans come in a variety of sizes – mammoth, extra large, large, medium, small and midget.

 

85058891_156b313898_b

 

  • Before a shelled pecan is ready to be sold, it must first be cleaned, sized, sterilized, cracked and finally, shelled.

 

pecans-1214697_1920

 

  • There are over 1,000 varieties of pecans.  Many are named for Native American Indian tribes, including Cheyenne, Mohawk, Sioux, Choctaw and Shawnee.

 

6691399313_b6b4890e6b_b

 

  • Texas adopted the pecan tree as its state tree in 1919.

 

pecan-1090266_1920
  • 2 Pecans provide nearly 10 percent of the recommended Daily Value for zinc.

 

 

Today’s Food History

  • 1828 The first edition of Noah Webster’s dictionary is copyrighted.
  • 1912 The British luxury liner Titanic struck an iceberg shortly before midnight. It sank at 2:20 a.m. on April 15.
  • 1927 Clarence Birdseye of Massachusetts received a U.K. patent for frozen fish fingers.
  • 1939 ‘The Grapes of Wrath’ by John Steinbeck was published.
  • 1964 Rachel Louise Carson died. An American biologist and author of ‘Silent Spring,’ about environmental pollution, especially the dangers of DDT.
  • 1989 ‘She Drives Me Crazy’ by Fine Young Cannibals is #1 on the charts

Food Finds about Pecans

Posted on April 14, 2012

Did you know that the pecan is American in origin?  The name “pecan” is a Native American word of Algonquin origin that was used to describe “all nuts requiring a stone to crack.” The pecan is heart healthy and contains antioxidants, 19 vitamins and minerals, fiber and “healthy fats.” One of the mineral components is zinc, which is important in producing testosterone in both males and females, key in sexual desire. Native Americans utilized and cultivated wild pecans in the 1500s. It is the only tree native to North America and is considered one of the most valuable North American nut species. Originating in central and eastern North America and the river valleys of Mexico, pecans were widely used by pre-colonial residents. Pecans were…

Pecan

Posted on April 13, 2010

The pecan (English pronunciation: /piːˌkɑn/), Carya illinoinensis or illinoensis, is a species of hickory, native to south-central North America, in Mexico from Coahuila south to Jalisco and Veracruz,[1][2] in the United States from southern Iowa, Illinois and Indiana east to western Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and western Tennessee, south through Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Florida, and west into New Mexico. “Pecan” is from an Algonquian word, meaning a nut requiring a stone to crack.[3] It is pronounced in various parts of the US as pi-KAHN, pi-KAN, PEE-kahn, or PEE-kan. In Mexico, pecans and walnuts share the same Spanish name, nuez, which is a cognate of the English word nut.

  

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