Posts tagged “restaurants

September 24th is National Cherries Jubilee Day!

Posted on September 24, 2018

High-res version

Here are today’s five thing to know about Cherries Jubilee:

  1. The cherry is the fruit of many plants of the genus Prunus, and is a fleshy stone fruit.
  2. The cherry fruits of commerce are usually obtained from a limited number of species, including especially cultivars of the wild cherry, Prunus avium.
  3. The name ‘cherry’, often as the compound term ‘cherry tree’, may also be applied to many other members of the genus Prunus, or to all members of the genus as a collective term.
  4. The fruits of many of these are not cherries, and have other common names, including plum, apricot, peach, and others.
  5. The name ‘cherry’ is also frequently used in reference to cherry blossom.

Today’s Food History

  • 1870 Georges Claude was born. A French engineer, he invented the neon light, commonly used for signs. 1936 Jim Henson, puppeteer was born. Creator of the ‘Muppets’ – including Miss Piggy and the Cookie Monster.
  • 1944 Rosa Lee Hawkins of the vocal group ‘The Dixie Cups’ was born.
  • 1991 Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel) died. Writer and cartoonist. A few of his childrens books were ‘Green Eggs and Ham,’ ‘One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish,’ ‘Scrambled Eggs Super!’ and ‘The Butter Battle Book’

September 15th is 🍔 National Double-Cheeseburger Day 🍔!

Posted on September 15, 2018

High-res version

Here are today’s five thing to know about double cheeseburgers:

  1. The oldest fast food restaurant in the world is the White Castle franchise, which opened in 1921.
  2. The people of America eat more burgers out at restaurants or on the go than they do at home.
  3. The largest hamburger ever created was over 8,000 pounds and was cooked for a burger festival in Wisconsin.
  4. However, the hamburger in its current form, with ground beef and a bun, is a decidedly American creation.
  5. Hamburgers are made of beef, not ham, and there is much debate over whether they actually originated in Hamburg.

Today’s Food History

  • 1885 Jumbo, an African elephant exhibited by in France, the London Zoo, and finally in the Barnum & Bailey Circus, died after being hit by a locomotive in Ontario, Canada. Jumbo was supposedly 12 feet tall at the time of his death.
  • 1898 William S. Burroughs died. An American inventor, Burroughs invented and manufactured  the first adding machine with a printer.
  • 1962 The Four Seasons ‘Sherry’ hits number 1 on the charts.
  • 1965 Green Acres TV show debuted.
  • 1971 Greenpeace founded.
  • 1981 The USDA announced that ketchup could be counted as a vegetable in the school lunch program.
  • 1995 Tan M&Ms are replaced by the new blue M&Ms. The tan ones originally replaced violet M&Ms in 1949.

September 11th is National Hot Cross Buns Day! / A ‘Day’ for Remembrance.

Posted on September 11, 2018

High-res version

The celebration of ‘Soul Cakes’ is a perfect and respectful way to celebrate the 9/11 tragedy.

Here are today’s five thing to know about Hot Cross Buns:

  1. A hot cross bun is a spiced sweet bun made with currants or raisins and marked with a cross on the top.
  2. Ancient Greeks marked cakes with a cross, to symbolize remembrance of those who have past, ‘Soul Cakes’
  3. They are believed by some to pre-date Christianity, although the first recorded use of the term “hot cross bun” was not until 1733.
  4. It is believed that buns marked with a cross were eaten by Saxons in honour of the goddess Eostre (the cross is thought to have symbolised the four quarters of the moon); “Eostre” is probably the origin of the name “Easter”.
  5. In many historically Christian countries, buns are traditionally eaten hot or toasted on Good Friday, with the cross standing as a symbol of the Crucifixion.

Today’s Food History

  • 1721 Rudolph Jacob Camerarius died. A German botanist, he showed the existence of sexes in plants, and identified the stamen and pistil as the male and female organs.
  • 1777 The Battle of Brandywine in the American Revolutionary War. The British win, enabling them to capture Philadelphia.
  • 1851 Sylvester Graham died in Northampton, Massachusetts. He advocated vegetarianism, temperance and the use of coarse ground whole wheat (graham) flour. He developed the Graham cracker in 1829.
  • 1959 Congress passed legislation creating the Food Stamp program.
  • 1961 The World Wildlife Fund, a  conservation organization, was founded.

July 30th is National Cheesecake Day 🧀+🍰=😋/ #NationalCheeseCakeDay

Posted on July 30, 2018

High-res version

Happy national Cheesecake Day!

Today’s 5 Facts about Cheesecake:

  1. Pennsylvania Dutch-style cheesecake uses a slightly tangy type of cheese with larger curds and less water content, called pot or farmer’s cheese.
  2. Philadelphia-style cheesecake is lighter in texture, yet richer in flavor than New York style cheesecake.
  3. Farmer’s cheese cheesecake is the contemporary implementation for the traditional use of baking to preserve fresh cheese and is often baked in a cake form along with fresh fruit like a tart.
  4. Country-style cheesecake uses buttermilk to produce a firm texture while decreasing the pH (increasing acidity) to extend shelf life.
  5. Lactose free cheesecake may be made either with lactose-free cream cheese or as an imitation using Vegan recipes combining non-dairy cream cheese alternatives with other lactose-free ingredients.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1739 Caspar Wistar founded the first successful large scale glass factory in the U.S. in Allowaystown, New Jersey.

1838 It supposedly rained frogs in London.

1849 Jacob Perkins died. Perkins was issued the first U.S. patent for a refrigerating machine. It used sulfuric ether compression.

1963 Lisa Marie Diane Kudrow was born. American actress, her first major TV role was as the strange waitress on ‘Mad About You.’

July 22nd is National Penuche Day

Posted on July 22, 2018

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Penuche:

  1. Penuche (Italian: panucci) is a fudge-like candy made from brown sugar, butter, and milk, using no flavorings except for vanilla. Penuche often has a tannish color, and is lighter than regular fudge.
  2. It is formed by the caramelization of brown sugar, thus its flavor is said to be reminiscent of caramel. Nuts, especially pecans, are often added to penuche for texture, especially in the making of penuche candies.
  3. It is primarily a regional food, found in New England and some places in the Southern United States, though in the latter it goes by different names, usually “brown sugar fudge candy”.
  4. Penuche is also used as a boiled icing flavor. Once very popular in Hawaii, its name was localized as panocha or panuche.
  5. Panocha is said to come from the Spanish word for raw sugar (but also Spanish slang for “vulva”).

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1376 Rat Catcher’s Day. The Pied Piper got rid of all the rats in the German town of Hamelin. When the townspeople refused to pay, the Pied Piper led all the towns children away.

1461 Charles VII of France was born. His mistress, Agnes Sorel, was a celebrated cook who created several dishes, and had several culinary creations named in her honor.. (Agnes Sorel soup garnish, Agnes Sorel Timbales, etc.).

1822 Gregor (Johann) Mendel was born. Mendel was an Austrian botanist whose work was the foundation of the science of genetics. Working mainly with garden peas (some 28,000 plants over 7 years), he discovered what was to become know as the laws of heredity.

1915 Sir Sanford Fleming died. He devised the present system of time zones while working for the Canadian Pacific Railway.

1956 Curnonsky (Maurice Edmond Sailland) died. At the age of 84, he leaned too far out of his window and fell to his death. French writer, novelist, biographer, and gastronome. Curnonsky was known as the “Prince of Gastronomes,” a title he was awarded in a public referendum in 1927, and a title no one else has ever been given.

1967 The rock group Vanilla Fudge made its concert debut in New York

July 19th is National Daiquiri Day

Posted on July 19, 2018

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Daiquiris:

  1. The Daiquiri cocktail, made of rum, lime juice and sugar, takes its name from the village and iron mines of Daiquiri near Santiago, Cuba, where the cocktail  originated around 1900.
  2. It was named either by American engineers working there, or by the U.S. troops who arrived there in 1898.
  3.  At least one source claims it did not appear until after World War I.
  4. Thirsty partygoers and responsible parents lookin’ for a frosty, fruity thrill can find drive-thru strawberry daiquiri stands just about anywhere in New Orleans.
  5. Drive-thrus now limit customers to only one straw per visit, and they can no longer pack adult-strength strawberry daiquiris with kids’ meals.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1104 Flitch Day. A married couple who can prove to a mock court with a jury of bachelors and maidens, that they have ‘not wished themselves unwed,’ are awarded a ‘flitch’ of bacon (half a pig). The origins of this custom are in Dunmow, Essex, England, details are not certain, but references to it go back to 1104. It has been a regular civic event in Dunmow since 1855. Now held every 4 years, and frequently televised.

1863 Curtis Fletcher Marbut was born. An American geologist and one of the founders of modern soil science. He was with the U.S. Bureau of Soils for 25 years.

1947 Bernie Leadon of the music group ‘Flying Burrito Brothers’ was born

1996 Mervyn Hugh Cowie R.I.P. Cowie was a British wildlife conservationist, founder and director of Kenya’s Royal National Parks.

July 17th is National Peach Ice-Cream Day

Posted on July 17, 2018

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Ice-Cream

  1. It takes 12 lbs. of milk to make just one gallon of ice cream.
  2. The U.S. enjoys an average of 48 pints of ice cream per person, per year, more than any other country.
  3. The ice cream cone’s invention is linked to the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis. An ice cream vendor reportedly didn’t have enough dishes to keep up with the demand, so he teamed up with a waffle vendor who rolled his waffles into cones!
  4. In 2003, Portland, Oregon bought more ice cream per person than any other U.S. city.
  5. The biggest ice cream sundae in history was made in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, in 1988, and weighed in at over 24 tons.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1763 John Jacob Astor was born in Waldorf, Germany. His descendants built the Waldorf-Astoria hotel.

1845 Charles Grey, 2nd Earl R.I.P. Grey (also Baron Grey and Viscount Howick) was given the recipe for Earl Grey Tea by a Chinese mandarin with whom he was friends (and/or whose life either he or another British diplomat saved).

1867 Harvard School of Dental Medicine was founded in Boston, Massachusetts. It was the first dental school in the U.S.

1948 Mick Tucker of the music group ‘Sweet’ was born.

1955 Disneyland opened in Anaheim, California.

1959 Mary Leakey, wife of Louis Leakey, discovered the oldest human skull in Tanganyika (Tanzania). It is about 1.8 million years old.

1961 The Supremes first single recording was released, ‘Buttered Popcorn.’

July 9th is National Sugar Cookie Day

Posted on July 9, 2018

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Cookies:

  1. American cookie jars evolved from British biscuit jars and first appeared on the scene during the Depression in the 1930s when housewives began making more cookies at home, rather than buying them at the bakery, and needed containers for them.
  2. Early American tinsmiths began making cookie cutters by hand back in the 1700s.
  3. The U.S. has a National Cookie Cutter Historical Museum located within the Joplin Museum Complex in Joplin, Missouri.
  4. In 1989, New Mexico named the ‘bizcochito’ its official state cookie. Bizcochito, derived from the spanish word ‘bizcocho’ which means biscuit, is a delicious shortbread cookie flavored with anise and topped with cinnamon sugar.
  5. The U.S. leads the world as the biggest cookie bakers and eaters, spending more than $550 million annually on Oreos alone.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1766 Jacob Perkins was born. Perkins was issued the first U.S. patent for a refrigerating machine. It used sulfuric ether compression.

1792 S.L. Mitchell was named as the first Professor of Agriculture, at Columbia College, New York City.

1815 The first natural gas well in the U.S. was discovered by accident, near Charleston, West Virginia. They had been digging a salt brine well.

1850 U.S. president Zachary Taylor died. He supposedly developed peritonitis after eating too much of a new dessert treat, strawberry ice cream, at a 4th of July celebration.

1869 Henry Tibbe invented the corncob pipe. The pipe was made from a white kernel corn that was used to make taco and tortilla flour. (But can you roll a cigar with a taco wrapper?)

1872 John F. Blondel of Thomason (Thomaston?), Maine, patented the first doughnut cutter.

1887 John Dickenson introduced paper napkins at his company’s annual dinner.

1894 Percy Le Baron Spencer was born. Spencer developed the microwave oven in 1946, after he noticed that some chocolate in his pocket had melted after being accidentally exposed to radiation from a magnetron tube he was working on at the time.

1957 Actress Kelly McGillis was born. McGillis has a restaurant here in Key West, Florida called Kelly’s Place

1982 Diet Coke was introduced.

2004 Jeff Smith, TV’s ‘Frugal Gourmet,’ died at age 65

July 7th is National Strawberry Sundae Day

Posted on July 7, 2018

High-res version

Happy National Strawberry Sundae Day!

Five Food Finds about Strawberries:

  1. In a test, subjects who ate nitrate rich foods like strawberries, before exercising burned 100 more calories than those who did not.
  2. Over 53 percent of seven to nine-year-olds picked strawberries as their favorite fruit.
  3. In France, Strawberries were thought to be an aphrodisiac.  A soup made of strawberries, thinned sour cream, borage, & powered sugar was served to newlyweds.
  4. Folk lore states that if you split a double strawberry in half and share it with the opposite sex, you’ll soon fall in love.
  5. In medieval times, strawberries were served at important functions to bring peace & prosperity.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1307 King Edward I of England died. King Edward I of England (ruled: 1272-1307). His coronation feast included 278 bacon hogs, 450 pigs, 440 oxen, 430 sheep and 22,600 hens and capons. I believe he had invited some guests to his coronation.

1550 The first chocolate arrived in Europe.

1568 William Turner died. William Turner, an English naturalist and botanist, is known as the ‘father of English Botany.’ His best known work was ‘A New Herball.’

1862 The first Land Grant Act was passed. Public lands were sold for agricultural education. This was the start of many state universities throughout the United States

1891 The Travelers Cheque was patented.

1912 The first Horn & Hardart Automat in New York City is opened. (The very first Automat Horn & Hardart opened was in Philadelphia on June 9, 1902).

1928 Otto Frederick Rohwedder spent many years working on a bread slicing machine beginning in 1912. He finally perfected it, and the first sliced bread was produced and sold at M.F. Bench’s Chillicothe Baking Company, 100 Elm Street in Chillicothe, Missouri. According to the story, Mr. Bench assisted Rohwedder in the fine tuning the new bread slicing machine. The Chillicothe, Missouri Constitution-Tribune of July 7, 1928 carried a story of the new machines first use.

1930 Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died. Creator of Sherlock Holmes. Holmes would go for days without food while working on a case.

1936 Henry F. Phillips patented the Phillips-head screw and screwdriver.

September 15th is National Double-Cheeseburger Day!

Posted on September 15, 2017

High-res version

Here are today’s five thing to know about double cheeseburgers:

  1. The oldest fast food restaurant in the world is the White Castle franchise, which opened in 1921.
  2. The people of America eat more burgers out at restaurants or on the go than they do at home.
  3. The largest hamburger ever created was over 8,000 pounds and was cooked for a burger festival in Wisconsin.
  4. However, the hamburger in its current form, with ground beef and a bun, is a decidedly American creation.
  5. Hamburgers are made of beef, not ham, and there is much debate over whether they actually originated in Hamburg.

Today’s Food History

  • 1885 Jumbo, an African elephant exhibited by in France, the London Zoo, and finally in the Barnum & Bailey Circus, died after being hit by a locomotive in Ontario, Canada. Jumbo was supposedly 12 feet tall at the time of his death.
  • 1898 William S. Burroughs died. An American inventor, Burroughs invented and manufactured  the first adding machine with a printer.
  • 1962 The Four Seasons ‘Sherry’ hits number 1 on the charts.
  • 1965 Green Acres TV show debuted.
  • 1971 Greenpeace founded.
  • 1981 The USDA announced that ketchup could be counted as a vegetable in the school lunch program.
  • 1995 Tan M&Ms are replaced by the new blue M&Ms. The tan ones originally replaced violet M&Ms in 1949.

September 11th is National Hot Cross Buns Day!

Posted on September 11, 2017

High-res version

The celebration of ‘Soul Cakes’ is a perfect and respectful way to celebrate the 9/11 tragedy.

Here are today’s five thing to know about Hot Cross Buns:

  1. A hot cross bun is a spiced sweet bun made with currants or raisins and marked with a cross on the top.
  2. Ancient Greeks marked cakes with a cross, to symbolize remembrance of those who have past, ‘Soul Cakes’
  3. They are believed by some to pre-date Christianity, although the first recorded use of the term “hot cross bun” was not until 1733.
  4. It is believed that buns marked with a cross were eaten by Saxons in honour of the goddess Eostre (the cross is thought to have symbolised the four quarters of the moon); “Eostre” is probably the origin of the name “Easter”.
  5. In many historically Christian countries, buns are traditionally eaten hot or toasted on Good Friday, with the cross standing as a symbol of the Crucifixion.

Today’s Food History

  • 1721 Rudolph Jacob Camerarius died. A German botanist, he showed the existence of sexes in plants, and identified the stamen and pistil as the male and female organs.
  • 1777 The Battle of Brandywine in the American Revolutionary War. The British win, enabling them to capture Philadelphia.
  • 1851 Sylvester Graham died in Northampton, Massachusetts. He advocated vegetarianism, temperance and the use of coarse ground whole wheat (graham) flour. He developed the Graham cracker in 1829.
  • 1959 Congress passed legislation creating the Food Stamp program.
  • 1961 The World Wildlife Fund, a  conservation organization, was founded.

July 30th is National Cheesecake Day

Posted on July 30, 2017

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Cheesecake:

  1. Pennsylvania Dutch-style cheesecake uses a slightly tangy type of cheese with larger curds and less water content, called pot or farmer’s cheese.
  2. Philadelphia-style cheesecake is lighter in texture, yet richer in flavor than New York style cheesecake.
  3. Farmer’s cheese cheesecake is the contemporary implementation for the traditional use of baking to preserve fresh cheese and is often baked in a cake form along with fresh fruit like a tart.
  4. Country-style cheesecake uses buttermilk to produce a firm texture while decreasing the pH (increasing acidity) to extend shelf life.
  5. Lactose free cheesecake may be made either with lactose-free cream cheese or as an imitation using Vegan recipes combining non-dairy cream cheese alternatives with other lactose-free ingredients.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1739 Caspar Wistar founded the first successful large scale glass factory in the U.S. in Allowaystown, New Jersey.

1838 It supposedly rained frogs in London.

1849 Jacob Perkins died. Perkins was issued the first U.S. patent for a refrigerating machine. It used sulfuric ether compression.

1963 Lisa Marie Diane Kudrow was born. American actress, her first major TV role was as the strange waitress on ‘Mad About You.’

July 22nd is National Penuche Day

Posted on July 22, 2017

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Penuche:

  1. Penuche (Italian: panucci) is a fudge-like candy made from brown sugar, butter, and milk, using no flavorings except for vanilla. Penuche often has a tannish color, and is lighter than regular fudge.
  2. It is formed by the caramelization of brown sugar, thus its flavor is said to be reminiscent of caramel. Nuts, especially pecans, are often added to penuche for texture, especially in the making of penuche candies.
  3. It is primarily a regional food, found in New England and some places in the Southern United States, though in the latter it goes by different names, usually “brown sugar fudge candy”.
  4. Penuche is also used as a boiled icing flavor. Once very popular in Hawaii, its name was localized as panocha or panuche.
  5. Panocha is said to come from the Spanish word for raw sugar (but also Spanish slang for “vulva”).

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1376 Rat Catcher’s Day. The Pied Piper got rid of all the rats in the German town of Hamelin. When the townspeople refused to pay, the Pied Piper led all the towns children away.

1461 Charles VII of France was born. His mistress, Agnes Sorel, was a celebrated cook who created several dishes, and had several culinary creations named in her honor.. (Agnes Sorel soup garnish, Agnes Sorel Timbales, etc.).

1822 Gregor (Johann) Mendel was born. Mendel was an Austrian botanist whose work was the foundation of the science of genetics. Working mainly with garden peas (some 28,000 plants over 7 years), he discovered what was to become know as the laws of heredity.

1915 Sir Sanford Fleming died. He devised the present system of time zones while working for the Canadian Pacific Railway.

1956 Curnonsky (Maurice Edmond Sailland) died. At the age of 84, he leaned too far out of his window and fell to his death. French writer, novelist, biographer, and gastronome. Curnonsky was known as the “Prince of Gastronomes,” a title he was awarded in a public referendum in 1927, and a title no one else has ever been given.

1967 The rock group Vanilla Fudge made its concert debut in New York

July 19th is National Daiquiri Day

Posted on July 19, 2017

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Daiquiris:

  1. The Daiquiri cocktail, made of rum, lime juice and sugar, takes its name from the village and iron mines of Daiquiri near Santiago, Cuba, where the cocktail  originated around 1900.
  2. It was named either by American engineers working there, or by the U.S. troops who arrived there in 1898.
  3.  At least one source claims it did not appear until after World War I.
  4. Thirsty partygoers and responsible parents lookin’ for a frosty, fruity thrill can find drive-thru strawberry daiquiri stands just about anywhere in New Orleans.
  5. Drive-thrus now limit customers to only one straw per visit, and they can no longer pack adult-strength strawberry daiquiris with kids’ meals.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1104 Flitch Day. A married couple who can prove to a mock court with a jury of bachelors and maidens, that they have ‘not wished themselves unwed,’ are awarded a ‘flitch’ of bacon (half a pig). The origins of this custom are in Dunmow, Essex, England, details are not certain, but references to it go back to 1104. It has been a regular civic event in Dunmow since 1855. Now held every 4 years, and frequently televised.

1863 Curtis Fletcher Marbut was born. An American geologist and one of the founders of modern soil science. He was with the U.S. Bureau of Soils for 25 years.

1947 Bernie Leadon of the music group ‘Flying Burrito Brothers’ was born

1996 Mervyn Hugh Cowie R.I.P. Cowie was a British wildlife conservationist, founder and director of Kenya’s Royal National Parks.

July 17th is National Peach Ice-Cream Day

Posted on July 17, 2017

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Ice-Cream

  1. It takes 12 lbs. of milk to make just one gallon of ice cream.
  2. The U.S. enjoys an average of 48 pints of ice cream per person, per year, more than any other country.
  3. The ice cream cone’s invention is linked to the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis. An ice cream vendor reportedly didn’t have enough dishes to keep up with the demand, so he teamed up with a waffle vendor who rolled his waffles into cones!
  4. In 2003, Portland, Oregon bought more ice cream per person than any other U.S. city.
  5. The biggest ice cream sundae in history was made in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, in 1988, and weighed in at over 24 tons.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1763 John Jacob Astor was born in Waldorf, Germany. His descendants built the Waldorf-Astoria hotel.

1845 Charles Grey, 2nd Earl R.I.P. Grey (also Baron Grey and Viscount Howick) was given the recipe for Earl Grey Tea by a Chinese mandarin with whom he was friends (and/or whose life either he or another British diplomat saved).

1867 Harvard School of Dental Medicine was founded in Boston, Massachusetts. It was the first dental school in the U.S.

1948 Mick Tucker of the music group ‘Sweet’ was born.

1955 Disneyland opened in Anaheim, California.

1959 Mary Leakey, wife of Louis Leakey, discovered the oldest human skull in Tanganyika (Tanzania). It is about 1.8 million years old.

1961 The Supremes first single recording was released, ‘Buttered Popcorn.’

July 9th is National Sugar Cookie Day

Posted on July 9, 2017

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Cookies:

  1. American cookie jars evolved from British biscuit jars and first appeared on the scene during the Depression in the 1930s when housewives began making more cookies at home, rather than buying them at the bakery, and needed containers for them.
  2. Early American tinsmiths began making cookie cutters by hand back in the 1700s.
  3. The U.S. has a National Cookie Cutter Historical Museum located within the Joplin Museum Complex in Joplin, Missouri.
  4. In 1989, New Mexico named the ‘bizcochito’ its official state cookie. Bizcochito, derived from the spanish word ‘bizcocho’ which means biscuit, is a delicious shortbread cookie flavored with anise and topped with cinnamon sugar.
  5. The U.S. leads the world as the biggest cookie bakers and eaters, spending more than $550 million annually on Oreos alone.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1766 Jacob Perkins was born. Perkins was issued the first U.S. patent for a refrigerating machine. It used sulfuric ether compression.

1792 S.L. Mitchell was named as the first Professor of Agriculture, at Columbia College, New York City.

1815 The first natural gas well in the U.S. was discovered by accident, near Charleston, West Virginia. They had been digging a salt brine well.

1850 U.S. president Zachary Taylor died. He supposedly developed peritonitis after eating too much of a new dessert treat, strawberry ice cream, at a 4th of July celebration.

1869 Henry Tibbe invented the corncob pipe. The pipe was made from a white kernel corn that was used to make taco and tortilla flour. (But can you roll a cigar with a taco wrapper?)

1872 John F. Blondel of Thomason (Thomaston?), Maine, patented the first doughnut cutter.

1887 John Dickenson introduced paper napkins at his company’s annual dinner.

1894 Percy Le Baron Spencer was born. Spencer developed the microwave oven in 1946, after he noticed that some chocolate in his pocket had melted after being accidentally exposed to radiation from a magnetron tube he was working on at the time.

1957 Actress Kelly McGillis was born. McGillis has a restaurant here in Key West, Florida called Kelly’s Place

1982 Diet Coke was introduced.

2004 Jeff Smith, TV’s ‘Frugal Gourmet,’ died at age 65

July 7th is National Strawberry Sundae Day

Posted on July 7, 2017

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Strawberries:

  1. In a test, subjects who ate nitrate rich foods like strawberries, before exercising burned 100 more calories than those who did not.
  2. Over 53 percent of seven to nine-year-olds picked strawberries as their favorite fruit.
  3. In France, Strawberries were thought to be an aphrodisiac.  A soup made of strawberries, thinned sour cream, borage, & powered sugar was served to newlyweds.
  4. Folk lore states that if you split a double strawberry in half and share it with the opposite sex, you’ll soon fall in love.
  5. In medieval times, strawberries were served at important functions to bring peace & prosperity.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1307 King Edward I of England died. King Edward I of England (ruled: 1272-1307). His coronation feast included 278 bacon hogs, 450 pigs, 440 oxen, 430 sheep and 22,600 hens and capons. I believe he had invited some guests to his coronation.

1550 The first chocolate arrived in Europe.

1568 William Turner died. William Turner, an English naturalist and botanist, is known as the ‘father of English Botany.’ His best known work was ‘A New Herball.’

1862 The first Land Grant Act was passed. Public lands were sold for agricultural education. This was the start of many state universities throughout the United States

1891 The Travelers Cheque was patented.

1912 The first Horn & Hardart Automat in New York City is opened. (The very first Automat Horn & Hardart opened was in Philadelphia on June 9, 1902).

1928 Otto Frederick Rohwedder spent many years working on a bread slicing machine beginning in 1912. He finally perfected it, and the first sliced bread was produced and sold at M.F. Bench’s Chillicothe Baking Company, 100 Elm Street in Chillicothe, Missouri. According to the story, Mr. Bench assisted Rohwedder in the fine tuning the new bread slicing machine. The Chillicothe, Missouri Constitution-Tribune of July 7, 1928 carried a story of the new machines first use.

1930 Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died. Creator of Sherlock Holmes. Holmes would go for days without food while working on a case.

1936 Henry F. Phillips patented the Phillips-head screw and screwdriver.

September 24th is National Cherries Jubilee Day!

Posted on September 24, 2016

High-res version

Here are today’s five thing to know about Cherries Jubilee:

  1. The cherry is the fruit of many plants of the genus Prunus, and is a fleshy stone fruit.
  2. The cherry fruits of commerce are usually obtained from a limited number of species, including especially cultivars of the wild cherry, Prunus avium.
  3. The name ‘cherry’, often as the compound term ‘cherry tree’, may also be applied to many other members of the genus Prunus, or to all members of the genus as a collective term.
  4. The fruits of many of these are not cherries, and have other common names, including plum, apricot, peach, and others.
  5. The name ‘cherry’ is also frequently used in reference to cherry blossom.

Today’s Food History

  • 1870 Georges Claude was born. A French engineer, he invented the neon light, commonly used for signs. 1936 Jim Henson, puppeteer was born. Creator of the ‘Muppets’ – including Miss Piggy and the Cookie Monster.
  • 1944 Rosa Lee Hawkins of the vocal group ‘The Dixie Cups’ was born.
  • 1991 Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel) died. Writer and cartoonist. A few of his childrens books were ‘Green Eggs and Ham,’ ‘One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish,’ ‘Scrambled Eggs Super!’ and ‘The Butter Battle Book’

September 15th is National Double-Cheeseburger Day!

Posted on September 15, 2016

High-res version

Here are today’s five thing to know about double cheeseburgers:

  1. The oldest fast food restaurant in the world is the White Castle franchise, which opened in 1921.
  2. The people of America eat more burgers out at restaurants or on the go than they do at home.
  3. The largest hamburger ever created was over 8,000 pounds and was cooked for a burger festival in Wisconsin.
  4. However, the hamburger in its current form, with ground beef and a bun, is a decidedly American creation.
  5. Hamburgers are made of beef, not ham, and there is much debate over whether they actually originated in Hamburg.

Today’s Food History

  • 1885 Jumbo, an African elephant exhibited by in France, the London Zoo, and finally in the Barnum & Bailey Circus, died after being hit by a locomotive in Ontario, Canada. Jumbo was supposedly 12 feet tall at the time of his death.
  • 1898 William S. Burroughs died. An American inventor, Burroughs invented and manufactured  the first adding machine with a printer.
  • 1962 The Four Seasons ‘Sherry’ hits number 1 on the charts.
  • 1965 Green Acres TV show debuted.
  • 1971 Greenpeace founded.
  • 1981 The USDA announced that ketchup could be counted as a vegetable in the school lunch program.
  • 1995 Tan M&Ms are replaced by the new blue M&Ms. The tan ones originally replaced violet M&Ms in 1949.


pinterest_logoe589afe69cac

Today’s Pinterest Board at : Foodimentary


September 11 is National Hot Cross Buns Day!

Posted on September 11, 2016

High-res version

The celebration of ‘Soul Cakes’ is a perfect and respectful way to celebrate the 9/11 tragedy.

Here are today’s five thing to know about Hot Cross Buns:

  1. A hot cross bun is a spiced sweet bun made with currants or raisins and marked with a cross on the top.
  2. Ancient Greeks marked cakes with a cross, to symbolize remembrance of those who have past, ‘Soul Cakes’
  3. They are believed by some to pre-date Christianity, although the first recorded use of the term “hot cross bun” was not until 1733.
  4. It is believed that buns marked with a cross were eaten by Saxons in honour of the goddess Eostre (the cross is thought to have symbolised the four quarters of the moon); “Eostre” is probably the origin of the name “Easter”.
  5. In many historically Christian countries, buns are traditionally eaten hot or toasted on Good Friday, with the cross standing as a symbol of the Crucifixion.

Today’s Food History

  • 1721 Rudolph Jacob Camerarius died. A German botanist, he showed the existence of sexes in plants, and identified the stamen and pistil as the male and female organs.
  • 1777 The Battle of Brandywine in the American Revolutionary War. The British win, enabling them to capture Philadelphia.
  • 1851 Sylvester Graham died in Northampton, Massachusetts. He advocated vegetarianism, temperance and the use of coarse ground whole wheat (graham) flour. He developed the Graham cracker in 1829.
  • 1959 Congress passed legislation creating the Food Stamp program.
  • 1961 The World Wildlife Fund, a  conservation organization, was founded.

July 30th is National Cheesecake Day

Posted on July 30, 2016

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Cheesecake:

  1. Pennsylvania Dutch-style cheesecake uses a slightly tangy type of cheese with larger curds and less water content, called pot or farmer’s cheese.
  2. Philadelphia-style cheesecake is lighter in texture, yet richer in flavor than New York style cheesecake.
  3. Farmer’s cheese cheesecake is the contemporary implementation for the traditional use of baking to preserve fresh cheese and is often baked in a cake form along with fresh fruit like a tart.
  4. Country-style cheesecake uses buttermilk to produce a firm texture while decreasing the pH (increasing acidity) to extend shelf life.
  5. Lactose free cheesecake may be made either with lactose-free cream cheese or as an imitation using Vegan recipes combining non-dairy cream cheese alternatives with other lactose-free ingredients.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1739 Caspar Wistar founded the first successful large scale glass factory in the U.S. in Allowaystown, New Jersey.

1838 It supposedly rained frogs in London.

1849 Jacob Perkins died. Perkins was issued the first U.S. patent for a refrigerating machine. It used sulfuric ether compression.

1963 Lisa Marie Diane Kudrow was born. American actress, her first major TV role was as the strange waitress on ‘Mad About You.’

July 22nd is National Penuche Day

Posted on July 22, 2016

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Penuche:

  1. Penuche (Italian: panucci) is a fudge-like candy made from brown sugar, butter, and milk, using no flavorings except for vanilla. Penuche often has a tannish color, and is lighter than regular fudge.
  2. It is formed by the caramelization of brown sugar, thus its flavor is said to be reminiscent of caramel. Nuts, especially pecans, are often added to penuche for texture, especially in the making of penuche candies.
  3. It is primarily a regional food, found in New England and some places in the Southern United States, though in the latter it goes by different names, usually “brown sugar fudge candy”.
  4. Penuche is also used as a boiled icing flavor. Once very popular in Hawaii, its name was localized as panocha or panuche.
  5. Panocha is said to come from the Spanish word for raw sugar (but also Spanish slang for “vulva”).

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1376 Rat Catcher’s Day. The Pied Piper got rid of all the rats in the German town of Hamelin. When the townspeople refused to pay, the Pied Piper led all the towns children away.

1461 Charles VII of France was born. His mistress, Agnes Sorel, was a celebrated cook who created several dishes, and had several culinary creations named in her honor.. (Agnes Sorel soup garnish, Agnes Sorel Timbales, etc.).

1822 Gregor (Johann) Mendel was born. Mendel was an Austrian botanist whose work was the foundation of the science of genetics. Working mainly with garden peas (some 28,000 plants over 7 years), he discovered what was to become know as the laws of heredity.

1915 Sir Sanford Fleming died. He devised the present system of time zones while working for the Canadian Pacific Railway.

1956 Curnonsky (Maurice Edmond Sailland) died. At the age of 84, he leaned too far out of his window and fell to his death. French writer, novelist, biographer, and gastronome. Curnonsky was known as the “Prince of Gastronomes,” a title he was awarded in a public referendum in 1927, and a title no one else has ever been given.

1967 The rock group Vanilla Fudge made its concert debut in New York

July 19th is National Daiquiri Day

Posted on July 19, 2016

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Daiquiris:

  1. The Daiquiri cocktail, made of rum, lime juice and sugar, takes its name from the village and iron mines of Daiquiri near Santiago, Cuba, where the cocktail  originated around 1900.
  2. It was named either by American engineers working there, or by the U.S. troops who arrived there in 1898.
  3.  At least one source claims it did not appear until after World War I.
  4. Thirsty partygoers and responsible parents lookin’ for a frosty, fruity thrill can find drive-thru strawberry daiquiri stands just about anywhere in New Orleans.
  5. Drive-thrus now limit customers to only one straw per visit, and they can no longer pack adult-strength strawberry daiquiris with kids’ meals.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1104 Flitch Day. A married couple who can prove to a mock court with a jury of bachelors and maidens, that they have ‘not wished themselves unwed,’ are awarded a ‘flitch’ of bacon (half a pig). The origins of this custom are in Dunmow, Essex, England, details are not certain, but references to it go back to 1104. It has been a regular civic event in Dunmow since 1855. Now held every 4 years, and frequently televised.

1863 Curtis Fletcher Marbut was born. An American geologist and one of the founders of modern soil science. He was with the U.S. Bureau of Soils for 25 years.

1947 Bernie Leadon of the music group ‘Flying Burrito Brothers’ was born

1996 Mervyn Hugh Cowie R.I.P. Cowie was a British wildlife conservationist, founder and director of Kenya’s Royal National Parks.

July 17th is National Peach Ice-Cream Day

Posted on July 17, 2016

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Ice-Cream

  1. It takes 12 lbs. of milk to make just one gallon of ice cream.
  2. The U.S. enjoys an average of 48 pints of ice cream per person, per year, more than any other country.
  3. The ice cream cone’s invention is linked to the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis. An ice cream vendor reportedly didn’t have enough dishes to keep up with the demand, so he teamed up with a waffle vendor who rolled his waffles into cones!
  4. In 2003, Portland, Oregon bought more ice cream per person than any other U.S. city.
  5. The biggest ice cream sundae in history was made in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, in 1988, and weighed in at over 24 tons.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1763 John Jacob Astor was born in Waldorf, Germany. His descendants built the Waldorf-Astoria hotel.

1845 Charles Grey, 2nd Earl R.I.P. Grey (also Baron Grey and Viscount Howick) was given the recipe for Earl Grey Tea by a Chinese mandarin with whom he was friends (and/or whose life either he or another British diplomat saved).

1867 Harvard School of Dental Medicine was founded in Boston, Massachusetts. It was the first dental school in the U.S.

1948 Mick Tucker of the music group ‘Sweet’ was born.

1955 Disneyland opened in Anaheim, California.

1959 Mary Leakey, wife of Louis Leakey, discovered the oldest human skull in Tanganyika (Tanzania). It is about 1.8 million years old.

1961 The Supremes first single recording was released, ‘Buttered Popcorn.’

July 9th is National Sugar Cookie Day

Posted on July 9, 2016

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Cookies:

  1. American cookie jars evolved from British biscuit jars and first appeared on the scene during the Depression in the 1930s when housewives began making more cookies at home, rather than buying them at the bakery, and needed containers for them.
  2. Early American tinsmiths began making cookie cutters by hand back in the 1700s.
  3. The U.S. has a National Cookie Cutter Historical Museum located within the Joplin Museum Complex in Joplin, Missouri.
  4. In 1989, New Mexico named the ‘bizcochito’ its official state cookie. Bizcochito, derived from the spanish word ‘bizcocho’ which means biscuit, is a delicious shortbread cookie flavored with anise and topped with cinnamon sugar.
  5. The U.S. leads the world as the biggest cookie bakers and eaters, spending more than $550 million annually on Oreos alone.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1766 Jacob Perkins was born. Perkins was issued the first U.S. patent for a refrigerating machine. It used sulfuric ether compression.

1792 S.L. Mitchell was named as the first Professor of Agriculture, at Columbia College, New York City.

1815 The first natural gas well in the U.S. was discovered by accident, near Charleston, West Virginia. They had been digging a salt brine well.

1850 U.S. president Zachary Taylor died. He supposedly developed peritonitis after eating too much of a new dessert treat, strawberry ice cream, at a 4th of July celebration.

1869 Henry Tibbe invented the corncob pipe. The pipe was made from a white kernel corn that was used to make taco and tortilla flour. (But can you roll a cigar with a taco wrapper?)

1872 John F. Blondel of Thomason (Thomaston?), Maine, patented the first doughnut cutter.

1887 John Dickenson introduced paper napkins at his company’s annual dinner.

1894 Percy Le Baron Spencer was born. Spencer developed the microwave oven in 1946, after he noticed that some chocolate in his pocket had melted after being accidentally exposed to radiation from a magnetron tube he was working on at the time.

1957 Actress Kelly McGillis was born. McGillis has a restaurant here in Key West, Florida called Kelly’s Place

1982 Diet Coke was introduced.

2004 Jeff Smith, TV’s ‘Frugal Gourmet,’ died at age 65

July 7th is National Strawberry Sundae Day

Posted on July 7, 2016

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Strawberries:

  1. In a test, subjects who ate nitrate rich foods like strawberries, before exercising burned 100 more calories than those who did not.
  2. Over 53 percent of seven to nine-year-olds picked strawberries as their favorite fruit.
  3. In France, Strawberries were thought to be an aphrodisiac.  A soup made of strawberries, thinned sour cream, borage, & powered sugar was served to newlyweds.
  4. Folk lore states that if you split a double strawberry in half and share it with the opposite sex, you’ll soon fall in love.
  5. In medieval times, strawberries were served at important functions to bring peace & prosperity.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1307 King Edward I of England died. King Edward I of England (ruled: 1272-1307). His coronation feast included 278 bacon hogs, 450 pigs, 440 oxen, 430 sheep and 22,600 hens and capons. I believe he had invited some guests to his coronation.

1550 The first chocolate arrived in Europe.

1568 William Turner died. William Turner, an English naturalist and botanist, is known as the ‘father of English Botany.’ His best known work was ‘A New Herball.’

1862 The first Land Grant Act was passed. Public lands were sold for agricultural education. This was the start of many state universities throughout the United States

1891 The Travelers Cheque was patented.

1912 The first Horn & Hardart Automat in New York City is opened. (The very first Automat Horn & Hardart opened was in Philadelphia on June 9, 1902).

1928 Otto Frederick Rohwedder spent many years working on a bread slicing machine beginning in 1912. He finally perfected it, and the first sliced bread was produced and sold at M.F. Bench’s Chillicothe Baking Company, 100 Elm Street in Chillicothe, Missouri. According to the story, Mr. Bench assisted Rohwedder in the fine tuning the new bread slicing machine. The Chillicothe, Missouri Constitution-Tribune of July 7, 1928 carried a story of the new machines first use.

1930 Sir Arthur Conan Doyle died. Creator of Sherlock Holmes. Holmes would go for days without food while working on a case.

1936 Henry F. Phillips patented the Phillips-head screw and screwdriver.

May 2 is National Chocolate Mousse Day

Posted on May 2, 2015

Here are today’s five things to know about Chocolate Mousse

  1. The word mousse is French and translates as “froth” or “foam.”
  2. Cold dessert mousses are often poured into decorative glasses and garnished with fruit, sweet sauces, or whipped cream.
  3. Savory mousses can be made from fish, shellfish, meat, foie gras, etc.
  4. There are three key constituents to a mousse: base, binder, and aerator.
  5. They may be hot or cold and are often squeezed through a piping bag onto some kind of platform to be used as hors d’oeuvres.

Fun Fact:

Savory mousse dishes were an 18th century French achievement. Dessert mousses (generally fruit mousses) began to appear much later, in the second half of the 19th century.

The first written record of chocolate mousse in the United States comes from a Food Exposition held at Madison Square Garden in New York City in 1892.

Chocolate mousse came into the public eye in the U.S. in the 1930s, about the time as chocolate pudding mixes were introduced.

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1878 At 7 a.m., the Washburn A flour mill in Minneapolis exploded, sending the roof 500 feet in the air. 18 workers were killed and seven other flour mills were also destroyed.
  • 1885 Good Housekeeping magazine begins publication. Founded by Clark W. Bryan, the magazine was purchased by Hearst publishing in 1911.
  • 1934 Sergey Vasilyevich Lebedev died. A Russian chemist who developed a method for large scale production of synthetic rubber. Production of polybutadiene was begun in 1932 using potatoes and limestone as raw materials.

dvdr1 2

April 8 is National Empanada Day

Posted on April 8, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Empanada:

  1. The Spanish word for bread is “pan”.  “Empanar” is a verb form that means “to bread”.  Emapanada is the past-participle, “breaded”.
  2. It’s basically a single-serving turnover.  It can be filled with sweet foods like fruits, sugars, and syrups, or savory foods like meats, cheeses, and oils.
  3. They originated in northwest Spain, in a region known as Galicia.
  4. Today they are most popular in Spanish-speaking countries across Europe and South America.
  5. Originally they were made with bread dough, but now they are made with pastries as well.

Fun Fact:

The bolani is an Afghan variant of the empanada. Bolanis are flatbreads stuffed with vegetables such as spinach or potato. They are served in the evenings during the Muslim feast of Ramadan as well as at other times.

Bolivian empanadas are made with beef, pork, or chicken, and usually contain potatoes, peas and carrots, as well as a hard-boiled egg, an olive, or raisins. They are called salteñas and are moon-shaped pouches of dough customarily seamed along the top of the pastry.

Empanadas are known as panada or pastel in Indonesia. The panada, has thick crust made of fried bread, giving it bread texture and is filled with spicy tuna and chili peppers. The pastel has thin crust and a fillings typically made of finely diced potatoes, carrot, green onions, chicken, garlic, and glass noodles.

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1513 Ponce de Leon landed in Florida while searching for the Fountain of Youth. He thought it was just another island of the Bahamas.
  • 1862 John D. Lynde of Philadelphia patented the first aerosol dispenser.
  • 1873 Alfred Paraf received a patent for the first commercially viable margarine manufacturing process.
  • 1879 The Echo Farms Dairy of New York began selling milk in glass bottles, the first in the U.S.
  • 1946 ‘Catfish’ Hunter, baseball pitcher, was born.
  • 1992 R.I.P. Benjamin Eisenstadt. He invented the artificial sweetener, ‘Sweet ‘n Low’ (granulated saccharin and dextrose).

dvdr1 2

April 4 is National Cordon Bleu Day

Posted on April 4, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Cordon Bleu:

  1. The phrase “Cordon Bleu” means “Blue Ribbon” when referring to the dish.
  2. Another use of the phrase “Cordon Bleu” comes from a distinguished order of sixteenth-century French knights, who apparently wore blue sashes and were therefore popularly referred to as the “Cordon-bleus.”
  3. Cordon Bleu is a thinly pounded piece of meat (most often chicken, but also veal or pork) stuffed with ham and cheese, then breaded and fried.
  4. Chicken Cordon Bleu is a relatively recent American creation, first found mentioned in the written word in 1967.
  5. Common variations on this recipe include baking instead of frying, skipping the breading, and switching the order of the meats.

Fun Fact:

The dish did not originate at any of the prestigious Cordon Bleu cooking schools of Europe as often thought. It is not exactly clear who was the first person to prepare and name the dish chicken cordon bleu.

There are many regional dishes from Europe that share characteristics with Chicken Cordon Bleu. Some of the countries that include roulades, or roll ups of meat, in their cuisine are Germany, France and Italy.

In largely Muslim-populated countries, the halal versions of chicken cordon bleu are also popular, but to cater to the halal requirement for the Muslims, the chicken is rolled around a beef instead of a pork product.

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1828 Casparus van Wooden of Amsterdam, patented chocolate milk powder.
  • 1871 Mary Florence Potts of Ottumwa, Iowa patented the ‘Mrs. Potts’ pressing iron. It had a detachable handle so several iron bodies could be heated and used in turn as one cooled down.
  • 1883 Peter Cooper died. American inventor and founder of the ‘Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art.’ He also obtained the first American patent for the manufacture of gelatin. In 1895, a cough syrup manufacturer, Pearl B. Wait purchased the patent and developed a packaged gelatin dessert. Wait’s wife, May David Wait named it Jell-O.
  • 1884 Adolphe Duglere died. A pupil of Careme, head chef of the Rothschild family, and head chef of the famous 19th century Paris restaurant, the Cafe Anglais.
  • 1887 William Cumming Rose was born. An American biochemist, he researched amino acids, and established the importance of the 8 essential amino acids in human nutrition.
  • 1893 Alphonse Pyrame de Candolle died. A Swiss botanist, author of ‘Origin of Cultivated Plants.’
  • 1899Benjamin F. Jackson patented a gas burner.
  • 1932 Vitamin C is first isolated by C.G. King at the University of Pittsburgh.
  • 1998 A locust plague in Ethiopia was reported that covered almost 4,000 acres

dvdr1 2

March 31 is Oysters on the Half Shell Day

Posted on March 31, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Oyster:

  1. An oyster has a lifespan of over 100 years.
  2. The oyster has no head, no biting mouth parts and no arms or legs.
  3. An oysters two or three inches in diameter would probably be three to five years old.
  4. It takes about 25 to 28 months for oyster larvae to reach market size.
  5. Oysters feed year-round, though they feed less in winter because they need less energy.

Fun Fact:

All shelled fish should be alive when you eat them raw.  If they’re dead (closed), toss them back.

There are over 5,000 different species of oyster world wide.

 The flavor and color of oysters is influenced by the sand or sediment and the waters that they live in.

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1814 John Lineback patented the cottonseed hulling machine.
  • 1848 William Waldorf Astor was born. William Waldorf Astor was a cousin of John Jacob Astor IV, the great grandson of John Jacob Astor. He built the Waldorf section (1893) of what would become the Waldorf Astoria (1897). The Empire State Building (1929) now stands on the site of the former hotel.
  • 1918 Daylight Savings Time went into effect in the U.S. for the first time.
  • 1989 Chefs from Japanese restaurants in New York have finally persuaded the FDA to allow them to import and serve fogu. The first shipment of Japanese blowfish (tora fugu) arrived today. The chefs had to attend special classes to protect their customers from poisoning.
  • 1946 G. Allan Nichol of the music group ‘The Turtles’ was born.
  • 2005 Frank Perdue president of Perdue Farms died today. He was the son of the company’s founder Arthur Perdue. Perdue is the 3rd largest poultry company in the U.S. 

dvdr1 2

March 28 is National Black Forest Cake Day

Posted on March 28, 2015

mybestrecipes.eu

mybestrecipes.eu

Here are today’s five thing to know about Black Forest Cake:

  1. Typically, Black Forest cake consists of several layers of chocolate cake, with whipped cream and cherries between each layer.
  2. In some European traditions sour cherries are used both between the layers and for decorating the top.
  3. Traditionally, Kirschwasser (a clear liquor distilled from tart cherries) is added to the cake, although other liquors are also used
  4. The cake is named not directly after the Black Forest (Schwarzwald) mountain range in southwestern Germany but rather from the specialty liquor of that region, known as Schwarzwälder Kirsch(wasser) and distilled from tart cherries.
  5. Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte was first mentioned in writing in 1934.

Fun Fact:

The record for the world’s largest authentic black forest cake, weighing 3000 kg, was set at Europa Park, Germany on 16 July 2006, by K&D Bakery.

In the history of black forest cake, it was not in the form of a cake but instead as a dessert recipe.

The forests in “Hansel and Gretel”, “Snow White”, and “Rapunzel” are based on the Black Forest. They are all German fairy tales.

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1797 The first U.S. patent for a ‘washing machine’ was issued (possibly to Nathaniel Briggs).  It was called a scrub board or wash board.
  • 1819 Sir Joseph William Bazalgette was born.  A British civil engineer, he designed the main sewer system for London.
  • 1897 Victor Mills was born.  He was a chemical engineer who worked for Proctor & Gamble.  He improved Duncan Hines cake mixes, improved Jif peanut butter, and invented Pampers disposable diapers.
  • 1968 ‘Whiskey On A Sunday’ was recorded by the Irish Rovers.
  • 1996 John Leonard submitted an order form along with ‘Pepsi Points’ and a check to Pepsi for a Harrier Jump Jet.  The Harrier had been featured in a Pepsi commercial as one of the items that could be redeemed for ‘points,’ or a combination of cash and points. Pepsi subsequently refused to send Leonard the Harrier Jump Jet (actual cost: $23 million).  Leonard then sued, and finally a judge ruled that the Harrier Jump Jet had obviously been mentioned in the promotion as a joke.

dvdr1 2

%d bloggers like this: