Posts tagged “restaurants

September 24th is National Cherries Jubilee Day!

Posted on September 24, 2018

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Here are today’s five thing to know about Cherries Jubilee:

  1. The cherry is the fruit of many plants of the genus Prunus, and is a fleshy stone fruit.
  2. The cherry fruits of commerce are usually obtained from a limited number of species, including especially cultivars of the wild cherry, Prunus avium.
  3. The name ‘cherry’, often as the compound term ‘cherry tree’, may also be applied to many other members of the genus Prunus, or to all members of the genus as a collective term.
  4. The fruits of many of these are not cherries, and have other common names, including plum, apricot, peach, and others.
  5. The name ‘cherry’ is also frequently used in reference to cherry blossom.

Today’s Food History

  • 1870 Georges Claude was born. A French engineer, he invented the neon light, commonly used for signs. 1936 Jim Henson, puppeteer was born. Creator of the ‘Muppets’ – including Miss Piggy and the Cookie Monster.
  • 1944 Rosa Lee Hawkins of the vocal group ‘The Dixie Cups’ was born.
  • 1991 Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel) died. Writer and cartoonist. A few of his childrens books were ‘Green Eggs and Ham,’ ‘One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish,’ ‘Scrambled Eggs Super!’ and ‘The Butter Battle Book’

September 15th is 🍔 National Double-Cheeseburger Day 🍔!

Posted on September 15, 2018

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Here are today’s five thing to know about double cheeseburgers:

  1. The oldest fast food restaurant in the world is the White Castle franchise, which opened in 1921.
  2. The people of America eat more burgers out at restaurants or on the go than they do at home.
  3. The largest hamburger ever created was over 8,000 pounds and was cooked for a burger festival in Wisconsin.
  4. However, the hamburger in its current form, with ground beef and a bun, is a decidedly American creation.
  5. Hamburgers are made of beef, not ham, and there is much debate over whether they actually originated in Hamburg.

Today’s Food History

  • 1885 Jumbo, an African elephant exhibited by in France, the London Zoo, and finally in the Barnum & Bailey Circus, died after being hit by a locomotive in Ontario, Canada. Jumbo was supposedly 12 feet tall at the time of his death.
  • 1898 William S. Burroughs died. An American inventor, Burroughs invented and manufactured  the first adding machine with a printer.
  • 1962 The Four Seasons ‘Sherry’ hits number 1 on the charts.
  • 1965 Green Acres TV show debuted.
  • 1971 Greenpeace founded.
  • 1981 The USDA announced that ketchup could be counted as a vegetable in the school lunch program.
  • 1995 Tan M&Ms are replaced by the new blue M&Ms. The tan ones originally replaced violet M&Ms in 1949.

September 11th is National Hot Cross Buns Day! / A ‘Day’ for Remembrance.

Posted on September 11, 2018

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The celebration of ‘Soul Cakes’ is a perfect and respectful way to celebrate the 9/11 tragedy.

Here are today’s five thing to know about Hot Cross Buns:

  1. A hot cross bun is a spiced sweet bun made with currants or raisins and marked with a cross on the top.
  2. Ancient Greeks marked cakes with a cross, to symbolize remembrance of those who have past, ‘Soul Cakes’
  3. They are believed by some to pre-date Christianity, although the first recorded use of the term “hot cross bun” was not until 1733.
  4. It is believed that buns marked with a cross were eaten by Saxons in honour of the goddess Eostre (the cross is thought to have symbolised the four quarters of the moon); “Eostre” is probably the origin of the name “Easter”.
  5. In many historically Christian countries, buns are traditionally eaten hot or toasted on Good Friday, with the cross standing as a symbol of the Crucifixion.

Today’s Food History

  • 1721 Rudolph Jacob Camerarius died. A German botanist, he showed the existence of sexes in plants, and identified the stamen and pistil as the male and female organs.
  • 1777 The Battle of Brandywine in the American Revolutionary War. The British win, enabling them to capture Philadelphia.
  • 1851 Sylvester Graham died in Northampton, Massachusetts. He advocated vegetarianism, temperance and the use of coarse ground whole wheat (graham) flour. He developed the Graham cracker in 1829.
  • 1959 Congress passed legislation creating the Food Stamp program.
  • 1961 The World Wildlife Fund, a  conservation organization, was founded.

July 30th is National Cheesecake Day 🧀+🍰=😋/ #NationalCheeseCakeDay

Posted on July 30, 2018

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Happy national Cheesecake Day!

Today’s 5 Facts about Cheesecake:

  1. Pennsylvania Dutch-style cheesecake uses a slightly tangy type of cheese with larger curds and less water content, called pot or farmer’s cheese.
  2. Philadelphia-style cheesecake is lighter in texture, yet richer in flavor than New York style cheesecake.
  3. Farmer’s cheese cheesecake is the contemporary implementation for the traditional use of baking to preserve fresh cheese and is often baked in a cake form along with fresh fruit like a tart.
  4. Country-style cheesecake uses buttermilk to produce a firm texture while decreasing the pH (increasing acidity) to extend shelf life.
  5. Lactose free cheesecake may be made either with lactose-free cream cheese or as an imitation using Vegan recipes combining non-dairy cream cheese alternatives with other lactose-free ingredients.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1739 Caspar Wistar founded the first successful large scale glass factory in the U.S. in Allowaystown, New Jersey.

1838 It supposedly rained frogs in London.

1849 Jacob Perkins died. Perkins was issued the first U.S. patent for a refrigerating machine. It used sulfuric ether compression.

1963 Lisa Marie Diane Kudrow was born. American actress, her first major TV role was as the strange waitress on ‘Mad About You.’

July 22nd is National Penuche Day

Posted on July 22, 2018

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Five Food Finds about Penuche:

  1. Penuche (Italian: panucci) is a fudge-like candy made from brown sugar, butter, and milk, using no flavorings except for vanilla. Penuche often has a tannish color, and is lighter than regular fudge.
  2. It is formed by the caramelization of brown sugar, thus its flavor is said to be reminiscent of caramel. Nuts, especially pecans, are often added to penuche for texture, especially in the making of penuche candies.
  3. It is primarily a regional food, found in New England and some places in the Southern United States, though in the latter it goes by different names, usually “brown sugar fudge candy”.
  4. Penuche is also used as a boiled icing flavor. Once very popular in Hawaii, its name was localized as panocha or panuche.
  5. Panocha is said to come from the Spanish word for raw sugar (but also Spanish slang for “vulva”).

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1376 Rat Catcher’s Day. The Pied Piper got rid of all the rats in the German town of Hamelin. When the townspeople refused to pay, the Pied Piper led all the towns children away.

1461 Charles VII of France was born. His mistress, Agnes Sorel, was a celebrated cook who created several dishes, and had several culinary creations named in her honor.. (Agnes Sorel soup garnish, Agnes Sorel Timbales, etc.).

1822 Gregor (Johann) Mendel was born. Mendel was an Austrian botanist whose work was the foundation of the science of genetics. Working mainly with garden peas (some 28,000 plants over 7 years), he discovered what was to become know as the laws of heredity.

1915 Sir Sanford Fleming died. He devised the present system of time zones while working for the Canadian Pacific Railway.

1956 Curnonsky (Maurice Edmond Sailland) died. At the age of 84, he leaned too far out of his window and fell to his death. French writer, novelist, biographer, and gastronome. Curnonsky was known as the “Prince of Gastronomes,” a title he was awarded in a public referendum in 1927, and a title no one else has ever been given.

1967 The rock group Vanilla Fudge made its concert debut in New York

July 19th is National Daiquiri Day

Posted on July 19, 2018

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Five Food Finds about Daiquiris:

  1. The Daiquiri cocktail, made of rum, lime juice and sugar, takes its name from the village and iron mines of Daiquiri near Santiago, Cuba, where the cocktail  originated around 1900.
  2. It was named either by American engineers working there, or by the U.S. troops who arrived there in 1898.
  3.  At least one source claims it did not appear until after World War I.
  4. Thirsty partygoers and responsible parents lookin’ for a frosty, fruity thrill can find drive-thru strawberry daiquiri stands just about anywhere in New Orleans.
  5. Drive-thrus now limit customers to only one straw per visit, and they can no longer pack adult-strength strawberry daiquiris with kids’ meals.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1104 Flitch Day. A married couple who can prove to a mock court with a jury of bachelors and maidens, that they have ‘not wished themselves unwed,’ are awarded a ‘flitch’ of bacon (half a pig). The origins of this custom are in Dunmow, Essex, England, details are not certain, but references to it go back to 1104. It has been a regular civic event in Dunmow since 1855. Now held every 4 years, and frequently televised.

1863 Curtis Fletcher Marbut was born. An American geologist and one of the founders of modern soil science. He was with the U.S. Bureau of Soils for 25 years.

1947 Bernie Leadon of the music group ‘Flying Burrito Brothers’ was born

1996 Mervyn Hugh Cowie R.I.P. Cowie was a British wildlife conservationist, founder and director of Kenya’s Royal National Parks.

July 17th is National Peach Ice-Cream Day

Posted on July 17, 2018

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Five Food Finds about Ice-Cream

  1. It takes 12 lbs. of milk to make just one gallon of ice cream.
  2. The U.S. enjoys an average of 48 pints of ice cream per person, per year, more than any other country.
  3. The ice cream cone’s invention is linked to the 1904 World’s Fair in St. Louis. An ice cream vendor reportedly didn’t have enough dishes to keep up with the demand, so he teamed up with a waffle vendor who rolled his waffles into cones!
  4. In 2003, Portland, Oregon bought more ice cream per person than any other U.S. city.
  5. The biggest ice cream sundae in history was made in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, in 1988, and weighed in at over 24 tons.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1763 John Jacob Astor was born in Waldorf, Germany. His descendants built the Waldorf-Astoria hotel.

1845 Charles Grey, 2nd Earl R.I.P. Grey (also Baron Grey and Viscount Howick) was given the recipe for Earl Grey Tea by a Chinese mandarin with whom he was friends (and/or whose life either he or another British diplomat saved).

1867 Harvard School of Dental Medicine was founded in Boston, Massachusetts. It was the first dental school in the U.S.

1948 Mick Tucker of the music group ‘Sweet’ was born.

1955 Disneyland opened in Anaheim, California.

1959 Mary Leakey, wife of Louis Leakey, discovered the oldest human skull in Tanganyika (Tanzania). It is about 1.8 million years old.

1961 The Supremes first single recording was released, ‘Buttered Popcorn.’

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