Posts tagged “roquefort cheese

July 26 is National Bagelfest

Posted on July 26, 2015

bagelfest

National Bagelfest

Five Food Finds about Bagels

  • Bagel history dates back to 1783, according to popular belief. They were created to honor King John III Sobieski of Poland, after he protected Austria’s people from an attack by Turkish invaders.  Rumor has it a local Austrian baker created the bagel in the shape of a stirrup to honor the renowned horseman, and named it a “beugel” (the Austrian word for stirrup).
  • Bagels are one of the only breads that are boiled before baked. Once the bagel dough is shaped into a circle, they are dipped in boiling water for 3 to 5 minutes on each side. After that, they are drained and baked for about 10 minutes.
  • That little hole in the center isn’t just for looks. Rumor has it the age old “role with the hole” design is rather efficient! The bagel hole comes in handy to thread multiple bagels onto a dowel, making transport easily, especially for street vendors selling the doughy delights.
  • Too busy to down breakfast and your morning cuppa Joe? Try combing your caffeine fix with your breakfast bite with a Buzzed Bagel! Molecular biologist Robert Bohannon created a bagel that actually contains the caffeine equivalent of one to two cups of coffee.
  • Believe it or not, despite the myriad bagel flavors available from blueberry to the “everything” bagel, the most popular choice is plain, followed closely by sesame.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1856 George Bernard Shaw, Irish playwright, was born. Known for his famous food quote: “There is no love sincerer than the love of food.”

1866 Beatrix Potter was born. English author of children’s books, her first and most famous story is ‘The Tale of Peter Rabbit,’ originally written as an illustrated letter to a sick child.

1922 Blake Edwards, American film director and producer. Among his films are ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s,’ ‘Days of Wine and Roses,’ and ‘The Tamarind Seed.’

1926 Roquefort cheese is the first cheese designated with an appellation d’origine contrôlée. Only cheese that is processed in Roquefort, France and aged in the caves there may be called Roquefort Cheese.’

1989 Leslie Merry was hit with a turnip thrown from a passing vehicle in London. He was knocked down and suffered a broken rib and a ruptured spleen. He died of respiratory failure, due to the accident.

National Peanut Butter and Jelly Day

Posted on April 2, 2013

National Peanut Butter & Jelly Day

Five Food Finds about Peanut Butter & Jelly

  • Studies show that there is a 75% chance that if you drop a slice of peanut buttered bread, it will fall face down.
  • 50 percent of all the peanuts grown around the world are used to make peanut butter.
  • It is estimated that the average American school child will have munched through 1500 Peanut Butter and Jelly sandwiches before graduation.
  • An 18 ounce jar of peanut butter will contain about 850 peanuts.
  • The largest recorded peanut butter and jelly sandwich in the world was lovingly crafted in Peanut, Pennsylvania in 1993. It was 40 ft long and contained 150lbs of peanut butter and 50lbs of jelly.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

742 Charlemagne was born. Charlemagne, Charles I, Charles the Great, King of the Franks, Charles le Grand, Carolus Magnus, Karl Der Grosse, King of the Lombards, master of Western Europe, Emperor.
Some of the food related ‘facts’ I have come across related to Charlemagne:
* the peacock was first served in Europe during his reign;
* Sauerbraten was invented by Charlemagne;
* Roquefort cheese was a favorite of his;
* the knife began to be used to eat food for the first time during his reign (rather than the fingers);
* Roses were used to cover tables for meals.

I have no real corroboration for any of these ‘facts’ think ‘truthy’

1819 The periodical, ‘American Farmer’ was founded by John Skinner

1827 Joseph Dixon began manufacturing the first lead (graphite) pencils. Necessary to write recipes and menus

1840 Emile Zola was born. French writer and critic who was also known as a gourmand. His detailed descriptions of simple meals, banquets and eating in his novels are among the best to be found anywhere. He was also known for his own luxury dinner parties. “What will be the death of me are bouillabaisses, food spiced with pimiento, shellfish, and a load of exquisite rubbish which I eat in disproportionate quantities.”

1863 THE RICHMOND BREAD RIOTS – Shortages of food caused hundreds of angry women gathered in Richmond, Virginia to march on the governor’s office and then on the government commissary to demand bread. It ended in a riot when they broke into the commissary and then other shops & buildings and carried out anything they could carry. Even the hospital reported losing over 300 pounds of beef.  Arrests were made, but at the request of authorities, the newspapers downplayed the incident, and records were later destroyed when the Confederate government fled and burned much of the town behind them.

  

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