Posts tagged “science

March 31 is Oysters on the Half Shell Day

Posted on March 31, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Oyster:

  1. An oyster has a lifespan of over 100 years.
  2. The oyster has no head, no biting mouth parts and no arms or legs.
  3. An oysters two or three inches in diameter would probably be three to five years old.
  4. It takes about 25 to 28 months for oyster larvae to reach market size.
  5. Oysters feed year-round, though they feed less in winter because they need less energy.

Fun Fact:

All shelled fish should be alive when you eat them raw.  If they’re dead (closed), toss them back.

There are over 5,000 different species of oyster world wide.

 The flavor and color of oysters is influenced by the sand or sediment and the waters that they live in.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1814 John Lineback patented the cottonseed hulling machine.
  • 1848 William Waldorf Astor was born. William Waldorf Astor was a cousin of John Jacob Astor IV, the great grandson of John Jacob Astor. He built the Waldorf section (1893) of what would become the Waldorf Astoria (1897). The Empire State Building (1929) now stands on the site of the former hotel.
  • 1918 Daylight Savings Time went into effect in the U.S. for the first time.
  • 1989 Chefs from Japanese restaurants in New York have finally persuaded the FDA to allow them to import and serve fogu. The first shipment of Japanese blowfish (tora fugu) arrived today. The chefs had to attend special classes to protect their customers from poisoning.
  • 1946 G. Allan Nichol of the music group ‘The Turtles’ was born.
  • 2005 Frank Perdue president of Perdue Farms died today. He was the son of the company’s founder Arthur Perdue. Perdue is the 3rd largest poultry company in the U.S. 

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March 31 is Oysters on the Half Shell Day

Posted on March 31, 2014

Oysters-and-Clams-on-half-shell-988x658

Interesting Food Facts about Oysters

  1. An oyster has a lifespan of over 100 years.
  2. The oyster has no head, no biting mouth parts and no arms or legs.
  3. An oysters two or three inches in diameter would probably be three to five years old.
  4. It takes about 25 to 28 months for oyster larvae to reach market size.
  5. Oysters feed year-round, though they feed less in winter because they need less energy.

Fun Fact:

All shelled fish should be alive when you eat them raw.  If they’re dead (closed), toss them back.

There are over 5,000 different species of oyster world wide.

 The flavor and color of oysters is influenced by the sand or sediment and the waters that they live in.

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1814 John Lineback patented the cottonseed hulling machine.
  • 1848 William Waldorf Astor was born. William Waldorf Astor was a cousin of John Jacob Astor IV, the great grandson of John Jacob Astor. He built the Waldorf section (1893) of what would become the Waldorf Astoria (1897). The Empire State Building (1929) now stands on the site of the former hotel.
  • 1918 Daylight Savings Time went into effect in the U.S. for the first time.
  • 1989 Chefs from Japanese restaurants in New York have finally persuaded the FDA to allow them to import and serve fogu. The first shipment of Japanese blowfish (tora fugu) arrived today. The chefs had to attend special classes to protect their customers from poisoning.
  • 1946 G. Allan Nichol of the music group ‘The Turtles’ was born.
  • 2005 Frank Perdue president of Perdue Farms died today. He was the son of the company’s founder Arthur Perdue. Perdue is the 3rd largest poultry company in the U.S. 

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National Food Service Worker’s Day

Posted on September 25, 2013

National Food Service Worker’s Day

Five Waiter Quotes

  • A Cannibal is a person who walks into a restaurant and orders a waiter.
  • A diplomat these days in nothing, but a head waiter who is allowed to sit down occasionally.
  • Epitaph for a dead waiter – God finally caught his eye.
  • I asked the waiter, ‘Is this milk fresh?’ He said, ‘Lady, three hours ago it was grass.’
  • I never taste the wine first in restaurants, I just ask the waiter to pour.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1777 Johann Heinrich Lambert died. He proved that was ‘pi’ that he proved was an irrational number.

1843 Melville Reuben Bissell was born. Bissell invented the carpet sweeper in 1876.

1879 The Cream Separator was patented.

1974 It is first reported that freon from aerosol cans is destroying the ozone layer above the earth.

1976 The largest dolphin caught with rod and reel weighed 87 pounds. It was caught off the coast of Costa Rica.

1985 William Cumming Rose died. An American biochemist, he researched amino acids, and established the importance of the 8 essential amino acids in human nutrition.

National Pralines Day

Posted on June 24, 2013

National Pralines Day

 

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1374 An outbreak of Dancing Mania (sometimes known as ‘St. John’s Dance’) occurred in Aix-la-Chapelle, France. People were overcome with bouts of uncontrollable, manic dancing. Frothing at the mouth, screaming, and sexual frenzy were other symptoms. Ergot (fungus) poisoning (from grain) is now believed to have been the ultimate cause.

1532 Robert Dudley, the earl of Leicester, was born.
Hey diddle, diddle, the cat and the fiddle,
the cow jumped over the moon.
The little dog laughed to see such sport,
and the dish ran away with the spoon.

Dudley was Queen Elizabeth I’s first court favorite. She called him her ‘puppy.’ He is the dog who laughs in the nursery rhyme ‘Hey diddle diddle,’ when the dish runs away with the spoon, i.e., when Lady Elizabeth Throckmorton, one of the Queen’s ladies in waiting, ran away with the Queen’s taster, the Earl of Hereford, since he did not favor the tight reign Elizabeth kept on her court. He was also the step-father of her second lover, the Earl of Essex.

1817 The first coffee was planted in Hawaii on the Kona coast.

1839 Gustavus Franklin Swift was born. Founder of the meat-packing business, Swift & Co., the inventor of the refrigerated railway car, and the first to ship ‘dressed’ beef to eastern markets instead of live animals.

1895 Jack Dempsey was born. He is regarded as one of the greatest boxers of all time. He held the world heavyweight title from 1919 to 1926. He then became a successful restaurateur in New York City.

2003 Richard Pough died. An American ecologist he was the founding president of the Nature Conservancy and helped found the World Wildlife Fund. In 1945, he was one of the first to warn about the dangers of DDT to fish and birds.

National Hazelnut Cake Day

Posted on June 1, 2013

National Hazelnut Cake Day

Five Food Finds about Hazelnuts

  • The hazelnut or filbert, blooms and pollinates in the middle of the winter. These trees can keep producing nuts for several hundred years.
  • Over 95% of the U.S. commercial production of the nut is in Oregon’s Williamette valley.
  • The first commercial filbert orchard in the state of Oregon was the Dorris Ranch in Springfield.
  • One theory of the origin of the name ‘filbert’ is that it comes from St. Philibert, a 7th century Frankish abbot, whose feast day is August 20, which happens to be in the middle of the nutting season in Europe.
  • The Hazelnut  blooms and pollinates in the middle of winter. The nuts begin to grow in the spring, and the are allowed to ripen until they fall off the trees and are then harvested.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1495 The first written mention of scotch whiskey is in the Exchequer Rolls of Scotland. A Friar John Cor was the distiller.

1812 Richard Kirwan was born. Kirwan was an eccentric Irish chemist who hated flies. He had dysphagia, which is the inability to swallow food without convulsive movements. He always dined alone.

1875 A.P. Ashbourne received a patent for a “Process Preparing Coconut for Domestic Use.”

1908 John Krohn walked over 9,000 miles around the perimeter of the United States with his wheelbarrow. He completed the walk in 357 days, resting on Sundays

1926 During this month, the first automatic pop-up toaster was introduced by the Waters-Genter Company of Minneapolis, Minnesota

1926 Marilyn Monroe (Norma Jean) was born. American actress, primarily remembered as being crowned Artichoke Queen of 1947 in Castroville, California.

1938 The first Superman comic book is published.

1951 The International Cheese treaty was signed. International Convention on the Use of Designations of Origin and Names for Cheeses.

1962 Rachel Carson’s ‘Silent Spring’ was published. An American biologist, the book was concerned with the dangers of environmental pollution, especially DDT

1976 Great-Britain & Iceland settle their codfish war.

1993 Brooklyn, New York begins recycling.

1996 Dr. Edward Anton Asselbergs died. In 1960 Dr. Asselbergs developed the process for making instant mashed potato flakes, the same basic process is still used world-wide today.

2006 Restaurateur Claude Terrail, owner of La Tour d’Argent in Paris, died at age 88.

National Pretzel Day

Posted on April 26, 2013

National Pretzel Day

Five Food Finds about Pretzels

  • The first pretzel was created in 610 A.D. by a monk in southern France or northern Italy. It was originally called a ‘pretiola’ and was renamed ‘pretzel’ later when the idea migrated to Germany and Austria.
  •  In 1861, pretzel twisting was the second highest-paying job in the Philadelphia region. Today, machines do the twisting, although at some artisan shops, tourists can still see it done the old-fashioned way.
  • The birthplace of the hard pretzel was Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The pretzel, or bretzel as it was called then, first came to America in 1710 with Palatine German immigrants (from the Rhineland) who settled in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania and became known, incorrectly, as the “Pennsylvania Dutch.”
  •  In the 18th century, German children would wear pretzel necklaces at the beginning of a new year for prosperity, health and good fortune.
  • In the 17th century, pretzels were known as a marriage knot. During a wedding ceremony, a couple would wish upon a pretzel, break it (like a wishbone), and eat it to signify their oneness. It is speculated that the term, “tying the knot,” originated in Switzerland in 1614 during a wedding between two prominent families.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1785 John James Audubon was born. Ornithologist, naturalist and artist, known mainly for his paintings and sketches of North American birds.

1877 Minnesota held a state day of prayer to plead for an end to a 4 year plague of Rocky Mountain locusts. In southwestern Minnesota, locusts had been eating crops, trees, tobacco, fence posts, leather, dead animals, sheep’s wool – everything but the mortgage. Two days later a snowstorm moved through and the locusts were never seen again. No one knows what caused the locust plague, nor why the Rocky Mountain locust became extinct after the plague.

1947 Pete Ham of the music group ‘Badfinger’ was born

1962 ‘Mashed Potato Time’ by Dee Dee Sharp is #1 on the charts.

1986 Chernobyl nuclear plant in the Ukraine explodes. The worst nuclear disaster in history. In addition to the human toll, agriculture  and livestock was contaminated by radiation in large areas of Europe for years to come.

1989 Lucille Ball died. Two of the funniest food related comedy routines ever done were the chocolate factory and the grape stomping episodes from her TV show, ‘I Love Lucy.’

2005 A herd of buffalo escaped from a farm and wandered around a Baltimore, Maryland suburb disrupting traffic, and shutting down several major highways. Police eventually herded them onto a nearby tennis court.

2006 Chicago banned the sale of foie gras.

National Chocolate Mousse Day

Posted on April 3, 2013

April 3rd is

National Chocolate Mousse Day

Five Food Finds about Chocolate Mousse

  • The word mousse is French and translates as “froth” or “foam.”
  • Cold dessert mousses are often poured into decorative glasses and garnished with fruit, sweet sauces, or whipped cream.
  • Savory mousses can be made from fish, shellfish, meat, foie gras, etc.
  • There are three key constituents to a mousse: base, binder, and aerator.
  • They may be hot or cold and are often squeezed through a piping bag onto some kind of platform to be used as hors d’oeuvres.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1829 James Carrington of Connecticut patented a coffee mill.

1845 William James Farrer was born. An Australian agriculturist, he developed several new cultivars of wheat.

1860 The first Pony Express mail delivery service by horse and rider between St. Joseph, Missouri to Sacramento, California began. The 1,800 mile run took 10 days.

1956 Elvis Presley sings ‘Heartbreak Hotel’ on the ‘Milton Berle Show.’ An estimated 25% of the American population tuned in to hear him.

1959 The Coasters song ‘Charlie Brown’ is banned by the BBC because it refers to “throwin’ spitballs.” The ban only lasted 2 weeks.

1974 The Super Tornado Outbreak. 148 tornadoes in 13 states in 26 hours. The world’s largest tornado outbreak in recorded history. It included six F5 tornadoes and 30 F4 tornadoes. The first tornado hit at 1 p.m. and the final tornado hit at 2 a.m. the following morning.

1982 The temperature in Lamberton, Minnesota dropped from 78 degrees F to 7 degrees F in 24 hours.  The 71 degree drop in temperature is a Minnesota record.

1985 The Brown Derby Restaurant in Hollywood, California closed after 57 years. Robert Cobb, owner of the Brown Derby, created the Cobb Salad there in 1936.

2010 Students at a Utah high school created a replica of Van Gogh’s ‘Starry Night’ using 2 tons of Malt-O-Meal cereal.

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