Posts tagged “snack

May 2 is National Chocolate Mousse Day

Posted on May 2, 2015

Here are today’s five things to know about Chocolate Mousse

  1. The word mousse is French and translates as “froth” or “foam.”
  2. Cold dessert mousses are often poured into decorative glasses and garnished with fruit, sweet sauces, or whipped cream.
  3. Savory mousses can be made from fish, shellfish, meat, foie gras, etc.
  4. There are three key constituents to a mousse: base, binder, and aerator.
  5. They may be hot or cold and are often squeezed through a piping bag onto some kind of platform to be used as hors d’oeuvres.

Fun Fact:

Savory mousse dishes were an 18th century French achievement. Dessert mousses (generally fruit mousses) began to appear much later, in the second half of the 19th century.

The first written record of chocolate mousse in the United States comes from a Food Exposition held at Madison Square Garden in New York City in 1892.

Chocolate mousse came into the public eye in the U.S. in the 1930s, about the time as chocolate pudding mixes were introduced.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1878 At 7 a.m., the Washburn A flour mill in Minneapolis exploded, sending the roof 500 feet in the air. 18 workers were killed and seven other flour mills were also destroyed.
  • 1885 Good Housekeeping magazine begins publication. Founded by Clark W. Bryan, the magazine was purchased by Hearst publishing in 1911.
  • 1934 Sergey Vasilyevich Lebedev died. A Russian chemist who developed a method for large scale production of synthetic rubber. Production of polybutadiene was begun in 1932 using potatoes and limestone as raw materials.

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March 24 is National Cake Pop Day

Posted on March 24, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Cake Pop:

  1. A cake pop is cake, baked in an appealing shape, hand dipped in frosting,  and decorated to taste, all on a stick to be eaten as candy.
  2. While there is no recorded date for the creation of cake pops. Most people say that Bakerella, a popular baking blog, helped make then a “pop” phenomenon.See Pinterest below
  3. In 2011, cake pops were considered the newest and most popular confectionery food trends
  4. Other variations of cake pops are  cake balls, cakesicles, cupcake pops, and cake-on-a-stick.
  5. Cake pops in recent years have become ubiquitous to Starbucks coffee shops.

* Bakerella celebrates National Cake Pop Day on Feb 1

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

      • 1765 The British Parliament passed the Quartering Act, which required American colonists to provide temporary quarters, food, drink, etc. to British troops stationed in their towns.
      • 1896 Clement Hardy received a patent for the rotary disk plow.
      • 1989 The worst oil spill in U.S. history (up to that point) occurred as the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Alaska’s Prince William Sound, and eventually leaked 11 million gallons of crude oil.  The effects on wildlife and fish was devastating.
      • 1990 R.I.P. Cookbook author Jane Grigson, age 61.

April 3 is National Chocolate Mousse Day

Posted on April 3, 2014

chocolate-mousse

Interesting Food Facts about Chocolate Mousse

  1. The word mousse is French and translates as “froth” or “foam.”
  2. Cold dessert mousses are often poured into decorative glasses and garnished with fruit, sweet sauces, or whipped cream.
  3. Savory mousses can be made from fish, shellfish, meat, foie gras, etc.
  4. There are three key constituents to a mousse: base, binder, and aerator.
  5. They may be hot or cold and are often squeezed through a piping bag onto some kind of platform to be used as hors d’oeuvres.

Fun Fact:

Savory mousse dishes were an 18th century French achievement. Dessert mousses (generally fruit mousses) began to appear much later, in the second half of the 19th century.

The first written record of chocolate mousse in the United States comes from a Food Exposition held at Madison Square Garden in New York City in 1892.

Chocolate mousse came into the public eye in the U.S. in the 1930s, about the time as chocolate pudding mixes were introduced.

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Today’s Food History

  • 1829 James Carrington of Connecticut patented a coffee mill.
  • 1845 William James Farrer was born. An Australian agriculturist, he developed several new cultivars of wheat.
  • 1860 The first Pony Express mail delivery service by horse and rider between St. Joseph, Missouri to Sacramento, California began. The 1,800 mile run took 10 days.
  • 1956 Elvis Presley sings ‘Heartbreak Hotel’ on the ‘Milton Berle Show.’ An estimated 25% of the American population tuned in to hear him.
  • 1959 The Coasters song ‘Charlie Brown’ is banned by the BBC because it refers to “throwin’ spitballs.” The ban only lasted 2 weeks.
  • 1974 The Super Tornado Outbreak. 148 tornadoes in 13 states in 26 hours. The world’s largest tornado outbreak in recorded history. It included six F5 tornadoes and 30 F4 tornadoes. The first tornado hit at 1 p.m. and the final tornado hit at 2 a.m. the following morning.
  • 1982 The temperature in Lamberton, Minnesota dropped from 78 degrees F to 7 degrees F in 24 hours.  The 71 degree drop in temperature is a Minnesota record.
  • 1985 The Brown Derby Restaurant in Hollywood, California closed after 57 years. Robert Cobb, owner of the Brown Derby, created the Cobb Salad there in 1936.
  • 2010 Students at a Utah high school created a replica of Van Gogh’s ‘Starry Night’ using 2 tons of Malt-O-Meal cereal.

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March 24 is National Cake Pop Day

Posted on March 24, 2014

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Interesting Food Facts about Cake Pops

  1. A cake pop is cake, baked in an appealing shape, hand dipped in frosting,  and decorated to taste, all on a stick to be eaten as candy.
  2. While there is no recorded date for the creation of cake pops. Most people say that Bakerella, a popular baking blog, helped make then a “pop” phenomenon.See Pinterest below
  3. In 2011, cake pops were considered the newest and most popular confectionery food trends
  4. Other variations of cake pops are  cake balls, cakesicles, cupcake pops, and cake-on-a-stick.
  5. Cake pops in recent years have become ubiquitous to Starbucks coffee shops.

* Bakerella celebrates National Cake Pop Day on Feb 1

Foodimentary’s cake pops pics.

Our pinterest cake pops pictures.

Today’s Food History

      • 1765 The British Parliament passed the Quartering Act, which required American colonists to provide temporary quarters, food, drink, etc. to British troops stationed in their towns.
      • 1896 Clement Hardy received a patent for the rotary disk plow.
      • 1989 The worst oil spill in U.S. history (up to that point) occurred as the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Alaska’s Prince William Sound, and eventually leaked 11 million gallons of crude oil.  The effects on wildlife and fish was devastating.
      • 1990 R.I.P. Cookbook author Jane Grigson, age 61.

National Chocolate Mousse Day

Posted on April 3, 2013

April 3rd is

National Chocolate Mousse Day

Five Food Finds about Chocolate Mousse

  • The word mousse is French and translates as “froth” or “foam.”
  • Cold dessert mousses are often poured into decorative glasses and garnished with fruit, sweet sauces, or whipped cream.
  • Savory mousses can be made from fish, shellfish, meat, foie gras, etc.
  • There are three key constituents to a mousse: base, binder, and aerator.
  • They may be hot or cold and are often squeezed through a piping bag onto some kind of platform to be used as hors d’oeuvres.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1829 James Carrington of Connecticut patented a coffee mill.

1845 William James Farrer was born. An Australian agriculturist, he developed several new cultivars of wheat.

1860 The first Pony Express mail delivery service by horse and rider between St. Joseph, Missouri to Sacramento, California began. The 1,800 mile run took 10 days.

1956 Elvis Presley sings ‘Heartbreak Hotel’ on the ‘Milton Berle Show.’ An estimated 25% of the American population tuned in to hear him.

1959 The Coasters song ‘Charlie Brown’ is banned by the BBC because it refers to “throwin’ spitballs.” The ban only lasted 2 weeks.

1974 The Super Tornado Outbreak. 148 tornadoes in 13 states in 26 hours. The world’s largest tornado outbreak in recorded history. It included six F5 tornadoes and 30 F4 tornadoes. The first tornado hit at 1 p.m. and the final tornado hit at 2 a.m. the following morning.

1982 The temperature in Lamberton, Minnesota dropped from 78 degrees F to 7 degrees F in 24 hours.  The 71 degree drop in temperature is a Minnesota record.

1985 The Brown Derby Restaurant in Hollywood, California closed after 57 years. Robert Cobb, owner of the Brown Derby, created the Cobb Salad there in 1936.

2010 Students at a Utah high school created a replica of Van Gogh’s ‘Starry Night’ using 2 tons of Malt-O-Meal cereal.

April 6 – National Caramel Popcorn Day

Posted on April 6, 2012

National Caramel Popcorn Day

Five Food Finds about Popcorn

  • Popcorn is made by boiling the water inside the corn kernel.  As the liquid water becomes gaseous, it occupies much more volume and therefore causes incredible pressure in the kernel that causes it to explode into being inside-out.
  • Unpopped popcorn kernels are called “old maids.”
  • Americans consume 17 billion quarts of popped popcorn annually, or 54 quarts per man, woman and child.
  • United States citizens consume more popcorn than any other country’s.
  • Being corn, popcorn that is unsalted, unbuttered, and otherwise unaltered is a very healthy snack.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1859 Massachusetts created the first Inspector of Milk position in the U.S.

1869 John Wesley Hyatt patented celluloid, the first synthetic plastic.

1896 Opening day of the first modern Olympic games. The last Olympics were held 1,500 years ago.

1930 ‘Twinkies’ go on sale for the first time.

1932 C. Glen King, at the University of Pittsburgh, isolated vitamin C from lemon juice.

1938 Roy J. Plunkett accidentally discovered Teflon.

1947 John Ratzenberger, actor, was born. He played ‘Cliff Clavin, Jr.’ on the TV series ‘Cheers.’

1954 TV dinners are introduced. C.A. Swanson & Sons introduced the first TV dinner: roast turkey with stuffing and gravy, sweet potatoes and peas. It sold for 98 cents and came in an aluminum tray, so you could just open the box and heat the dinner in the oven. (No microwave ovens back then).
Supposedly executive Gerald Thomas came up with the idea when the company had tons of leftover turkey from Thanksgiving (Didn’t we all?). The idea for the aluminum trays came from the trays used for airline food. They were an immediate success, and Turkey dinners are still the most popular Swanson frozen dinner. Swanson stopped calling them TV dinners in 1962.

1988 McDonald’s opened its 10,000th restaurant in Dale City, Virginia.

A History of Chocolate Bunnies

Posted on April 3, 2012

Did you know that hollow chocolate bunnies are a by-product of WWII cocoa rationing?  That way, they could keep their appealing shape while using significantly less material. Smithsonian magazine reports that the chocolate bunny has existed since the 19th century when it was initially created in Germany. Gourmet.com states that these treats were hidden for kids to find around springtime to commemorate the season. Whitman’s Chocolates produced chocolate bunnies as a take on the tradition in the mid 1800s, but not everyone was keen on the idea just yet. In 1890, Robert Strohecker was the first American shop owner to use a five-foot-tall chocolate bunny as an Easter promotion in his drug store. However, it wasn’t until the beginning of the 20th century when…

April 3 – National Chocolate Mousse Day

Posted on April 3, 2012

National Chocolate Mousse Day

Five Food Finds about Chocolate Mousse

  • The word mousse is French and translates as “froth” or “foam.”
  • Cold dessert mousses are often poured into decorative glasses and garnished with fruit, sweet sauces, or whipped cream.
  • Savory mousses can be made from fish, shellfish, meat, foie gras, etc.
  • There are three key constituents to a mousse: base, binder, and aerator.
  • They may be hot or cold and are often squeezed through a piping bag onto some kind of platform to be used as hors d’oeuvres.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1829 James Carrington of Connecticut patented a coffee mill.

1845 William James Farrer was born. An Australian agriculturist, he developed several new cultivars of wheat.

1860 The first Pony Express mail delivery service by horse and rider between St. Joseph, Missouri to Sacramento, California began. The 1,800 mile run took 10 days.

1956 Elvis Presley sings ‘Heartbreak Hotel’ on the ‘Milton Berle Show.’ An estimated 25% of the American population tuned in to hear him.

1959 The Coasters song ‘Charlie Brown’ is banned by the BBC because it refers to “throwin’ spitballs.” The ban only lasted 2 weeks.

1974 The Super Tornado Outbreak. 148 tornadoes in 13 states in 26 hours. The world’s largest tornado outbreak in recorded history. It included six F5 tornadoes and 30 F4 tornadoes. The first tornado hit at 1 p.m. and the final tornado hit at 2 a.m. the following morning.

1982 The temperature in Lamberton, Minnesota dropped from 78 degrees F to 7 degrees F in 24 hours.  The 71 degree drop in temperature is a Minnesota record.

1985 The Brown Derby Restaurant in Hollywood, California closed after 57 years. Robert Cobb, owner of the Brown Derby, created the Cobb Salad there in 1936.

2010 Students at a Utah high school created a replica of Van Gogh’s ‘Starry Night’ using 2 tons of Malt-O-Meal cereal.

March 24 – National Cake Pop Day

Posted on March 24, 2012

National Cake Pop Day

Also: National Chocolate Covered Raisins Day

Five Food Finds about Cake Pops

  • A cake pop is cake, baked in an appealing shape, hand dipped in frosting,  and decorated to taste, all on a stick to be eaten as candy.
  • While there is no recorded date for the creation of cake pops. Most people say that Bakerella, a popular baking blog, helped make then a “pop” phenomenon.See Pinterest below
  • In 2011, cake pops were considered the newest and most popular confectionery food trends
  • Other variations of cake pops are  cake balls, cakesicles, cupcake pops, and cake-on-a-stick.
  • Cake pops in recent years have become ubiquitous to Starbucks coffee shops.
* Bakerella celebrates National Cake Pop Day on Feb 1

Foodimentary’s cake pops pics.

Our pinterest cake pops pictures.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1765 The British Parliament passed the Quartering Act, which required American colonists to provide temporary quarters, food, drink, etc. to British troops stationed in their towns.

1896 Clement Hardy received a patent for the rotary disk plow.

1989 The worst oil spill in U.S. history (up to that point) occurred as the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Alaska’s Prince William Sound, and eventually leaked 11 million gallons of crude oil.  The effects on wildlife and fish was devastating.

1990 R.I.P. Cookbook author Jane Grigson, age 61.

March 9 – National Crab Day

Posted on March 9, 2012

National Crab Day

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1822 Charles Graham of New York received a patent for artificial teeth.

1839 Famous Food Fights
The Great Pastry War ended this day. A brief conflict began on November 30, 1838, between Mexico and France caused by a French pastry cook who claimed that some Mexican Army soldiers had damaged his restaurant. The Mexican government refused to pay for damages. Several other countries had asked the Mexican government for similar claims in the past due to civil unrest in Mexico, without any resolution. France decided to do something about it, and sent a fleet to Veracruz and fired on the fortress outside the harbor. They occupied the city on April 16, 1838, and through the mediation of Great Britain were promised payment of 600,000 pesos for the damages. They withdrew on March 9, 1839.

some content is courtesy of www.FoodReference.com, used with permission

March 7 – National Cereal Day

Posted on March 7, 2012

National Cereal Day

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1804 John Wedgwood, the son of Josiah Wedgwood of pottery fame, founded the Royal Horticultural Society.

1849 Luther Burbank was born. American horticulturist, he developed many new varieties of fruits and vegetables, including the Burbank Potato (1873), the Shasta Daisy, over 100 varieties of plums and prunes and 10 varieties of berries.

1897 Dr. John Kellogg served corn flakes for the first time to his patients at his hospital in Battle Creek, Michigan. They wouldn’t be sold commercially until 1906.

1914 The Coca Cola Bottler’s Association was formed.

What kind of biscuit do you like?

Posted on March 1, 2012

I am a life-long Southerner, and I have to say that biscuits are breakfast staple!

I like a warm, fresh buttermilk biscuit with a spicy sausage patty and a shot of hot sauce.  I want my biscuit crisp on the top and bottom and tender in the middle.

Now you can have a bad biscuit:  They can be too dry, doughy and under cooked, or — worst of all — burned on the bottom.

I’ll never forget a visit to my Yankee aunt’s house.  Bless her heart, she decided to cook me a “Southern” breakfast.

The biscuits were starchy and burned on the bottom.  Someone forgot to tell her how to season her iron skillet.  The sausage patty was like biting into a greasy hockey puck.  I won’t even tell you what the grits were like.  I try to block it out.  It was bad.

Being the true Southerner that I am (you fellow Southerners know what I’m talking about) I just smiled and chewed and tried my best to look like I was eating manna from Heaven.  There was no dog to slip the biscuit to.  I don’t think a dog would have been interested.

There are all kinds of biscuit combinations:

You can put jelly on them, bacon on them, gravy on them, ham on them, eggs on them, sausage on them, chicken on them, steak on them… I feel like Bubba Blue! I don’t think “scrimps” and biscuits mix for breakfast though.

So what kind of biscuit do YOU like for breakfast?

Heck, down here we can have them any time!

You can have biscuits on the side with fried chicken, with vegetable soup, use them as dumplings… Stop me!

Macaroon

Posted on May 10, 2010

The word macaroon is applied to a variety of light, baked confections, described as either small cakes or meringue-like cookies depending on their consistency. The original macaroon was a “small sweet cake consisting largely of ground almonds”[1] similar to Italian amaretti. Today, other common varieties include the coconut macaroon and the French macaroon or macaron, which can have various flavourings and is typically cream-filled. The English word macaroon and French macaron come from the Italian maccarone or maccherone. This word is itself derived from ammaccare, meaning crush or beat,[2] used here in reference to the almond paste which is the principal ingredient. Most recipes call for egg whites (usually whipped to stiff peaks), with ground or powdered nuts, generally almond or coconut. Almost all…

Popsicle

Posted on May 10, 2010

Popsicle is the most popular brand of ice pop in the U.S. and Canada. Popsicle is a trademark owned by Unilever, although it has entered the general vernacular in North America. It was founded in Michigan. The Popsicle was first made (But not patented) in 1905 by Frank Epperson, who was only 11 years old at that time. In 1905, Frank Epperson, then only 11 years old, left a stir stick in a mixture of powdered flavored soda[disambiguation needed] and water out on the porch. That night, temperatures in San Francisco reached a record low. When Epperson woke the next morning, he discovered the drink had frozen to the stir stick, creating a fruit flavored ‘icicle,’ a treat he had named the Epsicle. Eighteen…

Dessert

Posted on May 7, 2010

In Western culture, Dessert is a course that typically comes at the end of a meal, usually consisting of sweet food. The word comes from the French language as dessert and this from Old French desservir, “to clear the table” and “to serve.” Common desserts include cakes, cookies, pastries, ice cream, and candies, fruit may also be eaten with the dessert. In Russia, breakfast foods such as Bliny,Oladi, and Syrniki served with honey and jam are also popular as desserts. The word dessert is most commonly used for this course in U.S., Canada, Australia, and Ireland, while sweet, pudding or afters may be alternative terms used in the UK and some other Commonwealth countries, including India. In England, the term pudding might be used…

Hoagie

Posted on May 3, 2010

A submarine sandwich, also known as a sub, grinder, hero, hoagie, Italian sandwich, po’ boy, wedge, zep, torpedo, bocadillo or roll, is a sandwich that consists of an oblong roll, often of Italian, Spanish or French bread, split lengthwise either into two pieces or opened in a “V” on one side, and filled with various meats, cheeses, vegetables, seasonings, and sauces.[1][2] The sandwich has no standardized name, and many U.S. regions have their own names for it.[1] The usage of the several terms varies regionally but not in any pattern, as they have been used variously by the people and enterprises who make and sell them. The terms submarine and sub are widespread and not assignable to any certain region, though many of the…

Custard

Posted on May 3, 2010

Custard refers to a number of culinary preparations involving whipped and cooked milk, sugar and egg yolk mixtures. Custards are typically very rich and thick and have many uses in desserts. Custard bases may also be used for quiches and other savoury foods. As a dessert, it is made from a combination of milk or cream, egg yolks, sugar, and vanilla. Sometimes flour, corn starch, or gelatin is added. Custard is usually cooked in a double boiler (bain-marie) or microwave, or heated very gently in a saucepan on a stove, though custard can also be steamed, baked in the oven with or without a hot water bath, or even cooked in a pressure cooker. Custard preparation is a delicate operation, because a temperature increase…

Parfait

Posted on May 3, 2010

The French term for parfait can refer to a frozen syrup made of sugar syrup, egg, and cream. An American parfait is a dessert normally made by layering cream, ice cream, or flavored gelatin dessert with other ingredients such as granola, nuts, yogurt, syrups, liqueurs, fresh fruit, or whipped topping. A parfait is normally made in a tall clear glass making all layers visible. The term parfait traditionally refers to an ice-cream treat similar to a sundae. Currently, the term ‘yogurt parfait’ is being popularized by specialty retailers in America, being a layered concoction of fruit, yogurt and granola or other cereal. It is eaten for breakfast or as a snack.

Raisins

Posted on April 30, 2010

Raisins are dried grapes. They are produced in many regions of the world, such as Armenia, the United States, Australia, Chile, Argentina, Macedonia, Mexico, Greece, Syria, Turkey, Georgia, India, Iran, Pakistan, Iraq, China, Afghanistan, Togo, and Jamaica, as well as South Africa and Southern and Eastern Europe. Raisins may be eaten raw or used in cooking and baking.Raisins are sweet due to their high concentration of sugars. The sugar inside the fruit crystallizes if they are stored for a long period. This makes the dry raisins gritty, but does not affect their usability. The sugar grains dissolve when the raisins are swelled in (hot) water.

Pretzel

Posted on April 30, 2010

A pretzel is a type of European-descended baked good made from dough in soft and hard varieties and savory or sweet flavors often in a unique knot-like shapes. The archetypal pretzel shape is a distinctive symmetrical looped form, whereby the ends of a long strip of dough are intertwined or brought together and then twisted back onto itself in a certain way (“a pretzel loop”). However, some varieties are instead made in a more plain stick or rod shape. For seasoning and decoration glazes of lye or sugar, coarse or fine salt or sugar, various seeds and nuts can be used. Larger pretzels are typically consumed singly while small pretzels are served in multiples. Pretzels as a food are associated with different backgrounds, cultural…

Animal Crackers

Posted on April 17, 2010

In the late 1800s, animal-shaped cookies (or “biscuits” in British terminology) called “Animals” were imported from England to the United States. The demand for these crackers grew to the point that bakers began to produce them domestically. Stauffer’s Biscuit Company produced their first batch of animal crackers in 1871 in York, Pennsylvania.[1] Other domestic bakeries, including the Dozier-Weyl Cracker Company of St. Louis and the Holmes and Coutts Company of New York City, were the predecessors of the National Biscuit Company, today’s “Nabisco Brands”. Animal biscuit crackers were made and distributed under the National Biscuit Company banner. In 1902, animal crackers officially became known as “Barnum’s Animals” and evoked the familiar circus time theme. Later in 1902, the now-familiar box was designed for the…

Pecan

Posted on April 13, 2010

The pecan (English pronunciation: /piːˌkɑn/), Carya illinoinensis or illinoensis, is a species of hickory, native to south-central North America, in Mexico from Coahuila south to Jalisco and Veracruz,[1][2] in the United States from southern Iowa, Illinois and Indiana east to western Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina and western Tennessee, south through Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Florida, and west into New Mexico. “Pecan” is from an Algonquian word, meaning a nut requiring a stone to crack.[3] It is pronounced in various parts of the US as pi-KAHN, pi-KAN, PEE-kahn, or PEE-kan. In Mexico, pecans and walnuts share the same Spanish name, nuez, which is a cognate of the English word nut.

Cobbler

Posted on April 13, 2010

Cobbler is a traditional dish in both the United States and the United Kingdom, although the meaning of the term is quite different in each country. In the United States, it is usually a dessert consisting of a fruit filling poured into a large baking dish over a batter that rises through when baking. The batter forms as a dumpling within the cobbler as well as a crust for the top. In the United Kingdom it is usually a savoury meat dish, typically a lamb casserole, which is covered with a savoury scone-like topping—each scone (or biscuit) forming a separable cobbler. Fruit-based versions are also increasingly popular in the United Kingdom—although they still retain the separate cobbler (or biscuit) topping of the meat version—and…

Coffee Cake

Posted on March 30, 2010

The term coffee cake can refer to either of the following: * A class of cakes intended to be served with coffee or for similar breaks and snacks. Under this definition, a coffee cake doesn’t need to contain coffee. They are typically single layer cakes that may be square or rectangular like a stolen. Coffee cakes are typically flavored with cinnamon, nuts, and fruits. These cakes sometimes have a crumbly or crumb topping called Streusel and/or a light glaze drizzle. Blueberries are a fruit that may be added as an ingredient to this baked good, for example one might hear the phrase “blueberry coffee cake”. Some minor parallels to teacakes may be made, though teacakes are often smaller individual items served with tea. A…

Caramel Popcorn

Posted on March 30, 2010

Caramel corn is a confection made of popcorn covered in caramel or molasses, creating a sweet, crunchy treat. Mixes of caramel corn often contain nuts, like peanuts or almonds. Certain types of caramel corn are made with a white sugar-based caramel rather than the traditional brown sugar versions, for a lighter and more buttery flavor. The combination of caramel and corn dates back at least as far as the 1890s with Cracker Jacks. There are many commercial forms of caramel corn available, such as Cracker Jack, Fiddle Faddle and Lolly Gobble Bliss Bombs. Other caramelized flavorings may also be used. Chocolate, strawberry, watermelon, coconut, green apple, and blueberry are the most commonly found flavors, though many more often exist in specialized candy shops. These…

Raisin and Spice Bar

Posted on March 30, 2010

Raisins are dried grapes. They are produced in many regions of the world, such as Armenia, the United States, Australia, Chile, Argentina, Macedonia, Mexico, Greece, Syria, Turkey, Georgia, India, Iran, Pakistan, Iraq, China, Afghanistan, Togo, and Jamaica, as well as South Africa and Southern and Eastern Europe. Raisins may be eaten raw or used in cooking and baking.The word raisin dates back to Middle English and is a loanword from Old French; in Old French and French, raisin means “grape,” while, in French, a dried grape is referred to as a raisin sec, or “dry grape.” The Old French word in turn developed from the Latin word racemus, “a bunch of grapes.” Add a few raisins into any spice bar recipe and accentuate your…

Chocolate Mousse

Posted on March 30, 2010

Mousse (pronounced /ˈmus/) is derived from the French word mousse which means “lather” or “foam”. A mousse is a stable prepared food that incorporates air bubbles to give it a light and airy texture. Depending on how it is prepared, it can range from light and fluffy to creamy and thick.A dessert mousse is a form of dessert typically made from egg and cream (classically no cream, only egg yolks, egg whites, sugar, and chocolate or other flavorings), usually in combination with other flavors such as chocolate or puréed fruit, although recipes with chicken liver or other savory ingredients also exist. Once only a specialty of French restaurants, chocolate mousse entered into American and English home cuisine in the 1960s.

Cheese Doodle

Posted on March 30, 2010

Cheez Doodles are a cheese-flavored corn snack produced by Wise Foods, Inc. that are similar to Frito-Lay’s Cheetos, which debuted several years after Frito-Lay’s snack in the 1950’s. Originally manufactured by the Yohigh family, and brokered by Dave Birdie, it became the prevalent cheese puff in the East Coast. In the mid 60’s the company was acquired by Borden and assigned to the Wise potato chip division. Cheez Doodles remain one of the strongest brands marketed by Wise. Like Cheetos, Cheez Doodles came in many varieties. Wise recently made their Crunchy Cheez Doodles “cheezier.” Their less intense cheese flavor has been replaced by a slightly more powerful flavor. The new flavor is much more akin to Cheetos’. The original Cheez Doodle has a new…

Peanut Cluster

Posted on March 30, 2010

An excellent representative of the peanut cluster is the GooGoo Cluster. The GooGoo Cluster is an American candy bar sold since 1912 in Nashville, Tennessee. It was developed by Howell Campbell and the Standard Candy Company. The disk-shaped candy bar contains marshmallow, caramel and roasted peanuts covered in milk chocolate. GooGoo Cluster is considered the first combination candy bar, meaning it contained several types of candy rather than an all-chocolate bar. The name is thought to refer to the sound a baby makes; another theory is that the candy was sold at the Grand Ole Opry (GOO). During the Great Depression, Goo Goo Clusters were advertised as “a nourishing lunch for a nickel.” This slogan was used until the 1950s. Variations include GooGoo Supreme…

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