Posts tagged “soup

February 4 is National Homemade Soup Day

Posted on February 4, 2015

theyellowtable.com

theyellowtable.com

Here are today’s five thing to know about Homemade Soup:

Also: African Heritage & Health Week

  1. Women are more than twice as likely to eat soup as men, 9.67% vs. 4.0%.
  2. The Middle English word soupen meant “to drink in sips”, which is how most soups were consumed. The words “soup,” “supper,” “sip,” and “sop” are derived from  this term.
  3. Andy Warhol(who’s real name was Andrew Warhola) is famous for his Campbell ‘s soup can art of the 1960’s. Did you know his first works sold for around 100 dollars?  Today they sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars.
  4. We ‘eat’ and don’t drink soup. In most cultures, soup is had as a part of the meal. According to etiquette experts, since we consume soup with a spoon as opposed to sipping it from a bowl, we ‘eat’ it.
  5. The word soup is of Sanskrit origin! It is derived from the su and po, which means good nutrition.

Daily Quote: “Of soup and love, the first is the best.” ~ Spanish proverb

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1906 Clyde W. Tombaugh was born. An American astronomer who discovered the planet Pluto in 1930. His first telescopes were  made from old farm equipment parts
  • 1930 Candy maker Frank C. Mars of Minnesota introduced the Snickers bar in 1930. Did you know? Snickers was the name of his prized race horse.
  • 1941 Roy J. Plunkett received a U.S. patent for Teflon. He accidentally discovered it in 1938.
  • 1983 RIP Karen Carpenter from complications associated with anorexia nervosa.

March 13 – Chicken Noodle Soup Day

Posted on March 13, 2012

National Chicken Noodle Soup Day

Five Food Finds about Chicken Noodle Soup

  • Campbell’s first introduces ‘Chicken with Noodles’ soup in 1934
  • During a radio program on “Amos ‘n Andy”  Amos misread his script and said “Chicken Noodle Soup”.  Within a few weeks, Campbell’s changed the name.
  • Research has shown that each can of soup contains around 216 noodles measuring 32 to 34 feet of noodles.
  • Campbell’s create over a million miles of noodles for soup per year. Enough to go around the Earth 40 times.
  • According to the ingredients on the can, only 8% of the soup is chicken.
Extra Fact:In 1889 Campbell’s Soup labels adopted the crimson & white color scheme 
in honor of the Cornell University Football Team.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

  • 1764 Charles Grey, 2nd Earl, was born. Earl Grey was supposedly given the recipe for Earl Grey Tea by a Chinese mandarin with whom he was friends.
  • 1813 Lorenzo Delmonico, famed restaurateur was born at Marengo, Switzerland. In 1851 he joined his uncles in their catering and pastry shop in New York City. He transformed the business into one of the most famous restaurants in the country.
  • 1893 The original Waldorf Hotel opened. It had 450 rooms and almost 1,000 employees.
  • 1915 Wilbert Robinson (Uncle Robby), manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers, attempted to catch a baseball dropped from an airplane. Someone had substituted a grapefruit instead, which virtually exploded in his glove on impact, covering him with grapefruit pulp and juice, much to the amusement of his team.
  • 2006 While a Poultry and Food Science professor at Cornell University from 1949-1989 he developed chicken nuggets (keeping the breading on was the key), turkey ham, poultry hot dogs and many other products. He founded Cornell’s Institute of Food Science and Marketing in 1970, and in 2004 was inducted into the American Poultry Hall of Fame.

February 4 is National Homemade Soup Day

Posted on February 4, 2012

National Homemade Soup Day 

Also: African Heritage & Health Week

Soup Facts: 

1. Women are more than twice as likely to eat soup as men, 9.67% vs. 4.0%.

2. The Middle English word soupen meant “to drink in sips”, which is how most soups were consumed. The words “soup,” “supper,” “sip,” and “sop” are derived from  this term.

3. Andy Warhol(who’s real name was Andrew Warhola) is famous for his Campbell ‘s soup can art of the 1960’s. Did you know his first works sold for around 100 dollars?  Today they sell for hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Daily Quote: “Of soup and love, the first is the best.” ~ Spanish proverb

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

  • 1906 Clyde W. Tombaugh was born. An American astronomer who discovered the planet Pluto in 1930. His first telescopes were  made from old farm equipment parts
  • 1930 Candy maker Frank C. Mars of Minnesota introduced the Snickers bar in 1930. Did you know? Snickers was the name of his prized race horse.
  • 1941 Roy J. Plunkett received a U.S. patent for Teflon. He accidentally discovered it in 1938.
  • 1983 RIP Karen Carpenter from complications associated with anorexia nervosa.


January 21 – National New England Clam Chowder Day

Posted on January 21, 2012

National New England Clam Chowder Day

Daily Fact: An old French word chaudière, pronounced “chowda”, is a  large pot for cooking.

The likely origin of the word chowder.

Today’s Food History

Feast Day of St. Agnes, patron saint of gardeners(Catholic)

  • 1338 Charles V of France was born. He commissioned Taillevent to write what is considered the first professional “cookery” book in French, ‘Le Viandier’.
  • 1937  BBC first aired the Cook’s Night Out with Marcel Boulestin, the first television cook
  • 1908 New York City NY regulation makes it illegal for a woman to smoke or drink in public
  • 1912 Konrad (Emil) Bloch was born. Nobel prize winner for his work on cholesterol & fatty acids. Discovering that high levels of cholesterol may lead to an increased risk of heart attacks.
  • 1942 Bronx magistrate rules all pinball machines in bars and eating establishments illegal
  • 1985 James Beard, American culinary expert & cookbook author, died at age 81.

resources

January 8 – National English Toffee Day

Posted on January 8, 2012

toffeeNational Toffee Day

Fact: Toffee and Caramel are sometimes interchangeable.

The difference between the two?

Toffees consist of mainly sugar and water, while caramels use dairy products in their production, making them softer

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

  • 1676 Charles II of England revoked his previous proclamation suppressing Coffee Houses due to public response.
  • 1800 The first soup kitchens in London were opened to serve the poor.
  • 1823 Alfred Russel Wallace was born. Wallace was a British naturalist who developed a theory of natural selection independently of Charles Darwin. He sent his conclusions to Darwin, and their findings were both presented to the Linnaean Society in 1858.
  • 1825 Eli Whitney died. Inventor of the cotton gin, but more important he developed the concept of mass producing interchangeable parts.
  • 1872 African American inventor Thomas Elkins received his second patent. It was for a ‘Chamber Commode’ – a combination “bureau, mirror, book-rack, washstand, table, easy chair, and earth-closet or chamber-stool.”
  • 1894 Pierre Joseph van Beneden died. A Belgian parasitologist, he discovered the life cycle of tapeworms.
  • 1926 Comedian ‘Soupy Sales’ was born. Most of his routines ended with Soupy receiving a pie in the face.
  • 1992 President George H.W. Bush becomes ill on a trip to Japan and vomits on Japanese Prime Minister Miyazawa Kiichi.
  • 1998 Walter E. Diemer died. While working for the Fleer Chewing Gum Company, he experimented with recipes for chewing gum as a hobby. (He really liked his gum!). He invented bubble gum in 1928.
  • 2002 Dave Thomas, founder of Wendy’s Hamburger chain, died.

some content is courtesy of www.FoodReference.com, used with permission

January 21 – Today’s Food History

Posted on January 21, 2011

National New England Clam Chowder Day

Daily Fact: An old French word chaudière, pronounced “chowda”, is a  large pot for cooking.

The likely origin of the word chowder.

Today’s Food History

  • 1338 Charles V of France was born. He commissioned Taillevent to write what is considered the first professional “cookery” book in French, ‘Le Viandier’.
  • 1937  BBC first aired the Cook’s Night Out with Marcel Boulestin, the first television cook
  • 1912 Konrad (Emil) Bloch was born. Nobel prize winner for his work on cholesterol & fatty acids. Discovering that high levels of cholesterol may lead to an increased risk of heart attacks.
  • 1985 James Beard, American culinary expert & cookbook author, died at age 81.

some content is courtesy of www.FoodReference.com, used with permission

January 21

Posted on January 21, 2011

National New England Clam Chowder Day

Daily Fact: An old French word chaudière, pronounced “chowda”, is a  large pot for cooking.

The likely origin of the word chowder.

Today’s Food History

  • 1338 Charles V of France was born. He commissioned Taillevent to write what is considered the first professional “cookery” book in French, ‘Le Viandier’.
  • 1937  BBC first aired the Cook’s Night Out with Marcel Boulestin, the first television cook
  • 1912 Konrad (Emil) Bloch was born. Nobel prize winner for his work on cholesterol & fatty acids. Discovering that high levels of cholesterol may lead to an increased risk of heart attacks.
  • 1985 James Beard, American culinary expert & cookbook author, died at age 81.

some content is courtesy of www.FoodReference.com, used with permission

%d bloggers like this: