Posts tagged “star recipe

National Martini Day

Posted on June 19, 2013

National Martini Day

Five Food Finds about Martinis

  • The Martini, gin and vermouth, is probably the most popular and widely consumed cocktail. Its origin is in dispute, but it dates back to about 1862.
  • The Martini’s popularity has waxed and waned, and its recipe has changed considerably over the years.
  • Going from an original mixture that contained more Vermouth than Gin garnished with a lemon twist, to 2 to 1 gin and vermouth, to a 15 to 1 mixture, and finally straight chilled Gin.
  • There is also the Vodka Martini.
  • Standard Martini garnish is an olive, garnish it with a pearl onion and it is called a Gibson.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1912 The United States government adopted an 8-hour work day. (I’m still waiting!)

1931 The first commercial doors operated by a photoelectric cell were installed on the swinging doors between the kitchen and dining room of Wilcox’s Pier Restaurant in West Haven, Connecticut.

1941 General Mills introduced ‘Cherioats.’ The name was changed to ‘Cherrios’ in 1945.

1978 Garfield, the lasagna eating cat was born. He was brought into this world by cartoonist Jim Davis.

1987 Ben & Jerry Ice Cream introduced a new Ice Cream flavor, Cherry Garcia.

1993 English author William Golding died. His first novel was ‘Lord of the Flies’ (1954).

National Peanut Butter Cookie Day

Posted on June 12, 2013

National Peanut-Butter Cookie Day

Five Food Finds about Cookies

  • The first commercial cookie in the U.S. was the Animal Cracker, introduced in 1902.
  • The Oreo, the best-selling cookie of the 20th century, was developed and introduced by the American company Nabisco, in 1912.
  • The U.S. leads the world as the biggest cookie bakers and eaters, spending more than $550 million annually on Oreos alone.
  • In 1989, New Mexico named the ‘bizcochito’ its official state cookie. Bizcochito, derived from the spanish word ‘bizcocho’ which means biscuit, is a delicious shortbread cookie flavored with anise and topped with cinnamon sugar.
  • The U.S. has a National Cookie Cutter Historical Museum located within the Joplin Museum Complex in Joplin, Missouri.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1873 Rocky Mountain locusts enter southwestern Minnesota. The beginning of a 4 year crop destroying locust (grasshopper) plague.

1897 Carl Elsener patented the Swiss Army Knife.

1963 “Cleopatra” premiered in New York, staring Elizabeth Taylor, Richard Burton and Rex Harrison. It is rumored that the caterers were the only ones who made money on this movie.

1965 The Rolling Stones recorded the frustrated diners lament, “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.”

2004 A federal judge upheld a rule issued by the USDA on June 2, 2003 which declared that frozen, batter coated french fries are fresh vegetables. The judge stated that the term ‘fresh vegetables’ was ambiguous.
In 1981 the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) had unsuccessfully tried to classify ketchup and pickle relish as vegetables. Public protest caused them to drop the idea.

Good Friday – Hot Cross Buns Day

Posted on March 29, 2013

National Hot Cross Buns Day

Five Food Finds about Hot Cross Buns

  • A hot cross bun is a spiced sweet bun made with currants or raisins and marked with a cross on the top, traditionally eaten on Good Friday.
  • In many historically Christian countries, buns are traditionally eaten hot or toasted on Good Friday, with the cross standing as a symbol of the Crucifixion.
  • They are believed by some to pre-date Christianity, although the first recorded use of the term “hot cross bun” was not until 1733.
  • It is believed that buns marked with a cross were eaten by Saxons in honour of the goddess Eostre (the cross is thought to have symbolised the four quarters of the moon); “Eostre” is probably the origin of the name “Easter”.
  • Others claim that the Greeks marked cakes with a cross, much earlier.

 

  

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