Posts tagged “swedish botanist

September 21st is National Pecan Cookie Day!

Posted on September 21, 2018

High-res version

Here are today’s five thing to know about Pecan Cookie:

  1. If the body does not get enough zinc, it may have difficulty producing testosterone – a key hormone in initiating sexual desire in both men and women.  Pecans provide nearly 10 percent of the recommended Daily Value for zinc.
  2. It would take 11,624 pecans, stacked end to end, to reach the top of the Empire State Building in New York City.
  3. Texas adopted the pecan tree as its state tree in 1919.  In fact, Texas Governor James Hogg liked pecan trees so much that he asked if a pecan tree could be planted at his gravesite when he died.
  4. Albany, Georgia, which boasts more than 600,000 pecan trees, is the pecan capital of the U.S.  Albany hosts the annual National Pecan Festival, which includes a race, parade, pecan-cooking contest, the crowning of the National Pecan Queen and many other activities.
  5. Pecan trees usually range in height from 70 to 100 feet, but some trees grow as tall as 150 feet or higher.  Native pecan trees – those over 150 years old – have trunks more than three feet in diameter.

Today’s Food History

  • 1756 John Loudon McAdam was born. He invented macadam pavement for roads. The Macadamia Nut was named for him.
  • 1760 Olof Swartz was born. A Swedish botanist who collected plants in Jamaica and Hispaniola, and published several books on the plants of the Caribbean.
  • 1937 J.R.R. Tolkein’s ‘The Hobbit’ was published. Hobbits were well known as both gourmets and gourmands.
  • 1961 Earle Dickson died. He invented Band-Aids for his wife, who had frequent kitchen accidents, cutting or burning herself. He worked for Johnson & Johnson, who soon began manufacturing Band-Aids.
  • 1971 Coca Cola introduced the plastic bottle.

September 21st is National Pecan Cookie Day!

Posted on September 21, 2017

High-res version

Here are today’s five thing to know about Pecan Cookie:

  1. If the body does not get enough zinc, it may have difficulty producing testosterone – a key hormone in initiating sexual desire in both men and women.  Pecans provide nearly 10 percent of the recommended Daily Value for zinc.
  2. It would take 11,624 pecans, stacked end to end, to reach the top of the Empire State Building in New York City.
  3. Texas adopted the pecan tree as its state tree in 1919.  In fact, Texas Governor James Hogg liked pecan trees so much that he asked if a pecan tree could be planted at his gravesite when he died.
  4. Albany, Georgia, which boasts more than 600,000 pecan trees, is the pecan capital of the U.S.  Albany hosts the annual National Pecan Festival, which includes a race, parade, pecan-cooking contest, the crowning of the National Pecan Queen and many other activities.
  5. Pecan trees usually range in height from 70 to 100 feet, but some trees grow as tall as 150 feet or higher.  Native pecan trees – those over 150 years old – have trunks more than three feet in diameter.

Today’s Food History

  • 1756 John Loudon McAdam was born. He invented macadam pavement for roads. The Macadamia Nut was named for him.
  • 1760 Olof Swartz was born. A Swedish botanist who collected plants in Jamaica and Hispaniola, and published several books on the plants of the Caribbean.
  • 1937 J.R.R. Tolkein’s ‘The Hobbit’ was published. Hobbits were well known as both gourmets and gourmands.
  • 1961 Earle Dickson died. He invented Band-Aids for his wife, who had frequent kitchen accidents, cutting or burning herself. He worked for Johnson & Johnson, who soon began manufacturing Band-Aids.
  • 1971 Coca Cola introduced the plastic bottle.

September 21st is National Pecan Cookie Day!

Posted on September 21, 2016

High-res version

Here are today’s five thing to know about Pecan Cookie:

  1. If the body does not get enough zinc, it may have difficulty producing testosterone – a key hormone in initiating sexual desire in both men and women.  Pecans provide nearly 10 percent of the recommended Daily Value for zinc.
  2. It would take 11,624 pecans, stacked end to end, to reach the top of the Empire State Building in New York City.
  3. Texas adopted the pecan tree as its state tree in 1919.  In fact, Texas Governor James Hogg liked pecan trees so much that he asked if a pecan tree could be planted at his gravesite when he died.
  4. Albany, Georgia, which boasts more than 600,000 pecan trees, is the pecan capital of the U.S.  Albany hosts the annual National Pecan Festival, which includes a race, parade, pecan-cooking contest, the crowning of the National Pecan Queen and many other activities.
  5. Pecan trees usually range in height from 70 to 100 feet, but some trees grow as tall as 150 feet or higher.  Native pecan trees – those over 150 years old – have trunks more than three feet in diameter.

Today’s Food History

  • 1756 John Loudon McAdam was born. He invented macadam pavement for roads. The Macadamia Nut was named for him.
  • 1760 Olof Swartz was born. A Swedish botanist who collected plants in Jamaica and Hispaniola, and published several books on the plants of the Caribbean.
  • 1937 J.R.R. Tolkein’s ‘The Hobbit’ was published. Hobbits were well known as both gourmets and gourmands.
  • 1961 Earle Dickson died. He invented Band-Aids for his wife, who had frequent kitchen accidents, cutting or burning herself. He worked for Johnson & Johnson, who soon began manufacturing Band-Aids.
  • 1971 Coca Cola introduced the plastic bottle.

National Wine Day

Posted on May 25, 2013

National Wine Day

Five Food Finds about Wine

  • The longest recorded champagne cork flight was 177 feet and 9 inches, four feet from level ground at Woodbury Vineyards in New York State.
  • Thomas Jefferson helped stock the wine cellars of the first five U.S. presidents and was very partial to fine Bordeaux and Madeira.
  • Chilling tones down the sweetness of wine. If a red wine becomes too warm, it may lose some of its fruity flavor.
  • The Irish believe that fairies are extremely fond of good wine.
  • Foot treading of grapes is still used in producing a small quantity of the best port wines.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1789 R.I.P. Anders Dahl. A renowned Swedish botanist, the Dahlia flower was named for him.

1877 Minnesota’s $1.00 per bushel bounty on grasshopper eggs expires. The state had experienced a 4 year grasshopper (locust) plague.

1882 The first frozen mutton from New Zealand arrived in Britain

1973 Wrexham Asda supermarket opened in the U.K.

1986 Six million Americans participate in ‘Hand Across America’ by holding hands and singing across 4,150 miles of road in support of the hungry and homeless.

2007 Coca Cola created a 3,000 gallon, 15 foot high ice cream float with Vanilla Coke and ice cream, and set a new world record for the largest ice cream float.  The float was certified as drinkable by health inspectors, but it was disposed of by a garbage company.  Coke also held the previous record from 1998 with a 2,085 gallon float.

National Taffy Day

Posted on May 23, 2013

National Taffy Day

Five Food Finds about Taffy

  • Salt water taffy was “invented” in Atlantic City in 1883.
  • Modern technology allows confectioners to produce 1,000 pieces of taffy a minute.
  • In one hour enough pieces of taffy are made to cover one third of the length of Atlantic City (about 1.3 miles).
  • The three most popular taffy flavors sold by Sweet Candy Company are peppermint, cinnamon and chocolate.
  • America celebrates National Taffy Day May 23rd.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1707 Carolus Linnaeus was born. He was a Swedish botanist who developed the 2 name or binomial system for defining and naming plants.

1774 Residents of Chestertown, Maryland  react to news of the Boston Tea Party by staging a similar protest, dumping a shipment of tea into the Chester River.

1868 R.I.P. Kit Carson, American frontiersman. His last words were supposedly “Wish I had time for just one more bowl of chili.”

1922 Thomas Edison patented a method for making metal foils.

1960 R.I.P. Georges Claude. A French engineer, he invented the neon light, commonly used for signs.

1968 ‘Yummy, Yummy, Yummy’ by the Ohio Express is #1 on the charts.

  

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