Posts tagged “transportation

July 19th is National Daiquiri Day

Posted on July 19, 2018

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Daiquiris:

  1. The Daiquiri cocktail, made of rum, lime juice and sugar, takes its name from the village and iron mines of Daiquiri near Santiago, Cuba, where the cocktail  originated around 1900.
  2. It was named either by American engineers working there, or by the U.S. troops who arrived there in 1898.
  3.  At least one source claims it did not appear until after World War I.
  4. Thirsty partygoers and responsible parents lookin’ for a frosty, fruity thrill can find drive-thru strawberry daiquiri stands just about anywhere in New Orleans.
  5. Drive-thrus now limit customers to only one straw per visit, and they can no longer pack adult-strength strawberry daiquiris with kids’ meals.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1104 Flitch Day. A married couple who can prove to a mock court with a jury of bachelors and maidens, that they have ‘not wished themselves unwed,’ are awarded a ‘flitch’ of bacon (half a pig). The origins of this custom are in Dunmow, Essex, England, details are not certain, but references to it go back to 1104. It has been a regular civic event in Dunmow since 1855. Now held every 4 years, and frequently televised.

1863 Curtis Fletcher Marbut was born. An American geologist and one of the founders of modern soil science. He was with the U.S. Bureau of Soils for 25 years.

1947 Bernie Leadon of the music group ‘Flying Burrito Brothers’ was born

1996 Mervyn Hugh Cowie R.I.P. Cowie was a British wildlife conservationist, founder and director of Kenya’s Royal National Parks.

July 19th is National Daiquiri Day

Posted on July 19, 2017

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Daiquiris:

  1. The Daiquiri cocktail, made of rum, lime juice and sugar, takes its name from the village and iron mines of Daiquiri near Santiago, Cuba, where the cocktail  originated around 1900.
  2. It was named either by American engineers working there, or by the U.S. troops who arrived there in 1898.
  3.  At least one source claims it did not appear until after World War I.
  4. Thirsty partygoers and responsible parents lookin’ for a frosty, fruity thrill can find drive-thru strawberry daiquiri stands just about anywhere in New Orleans.
  5. Drive-thrus now limit customers to only one straw per visit, and they can no longer pack adult-strength strawberry daiquiris with kids’ meals.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1104 Flitch Day. A married couple who can prove to a mock court with a jury of bachelors and maidens, that they have ‘not wished themselves unwed,’ are awarded a ‘flitch’ of bacon (half a pig). The origins of this custom are in Dunmow, Essex, England, details are not certain, but references to it go back to 1104. It has been a regular civic event in Dunmow since 1855. Now held every 4 years, and frequently televised.

1863 Curtis Fletcher Marbut was born. An American geologist and one of the founders of modern soil science. He was with the U.S. Bureau of Soils for 25 years.

1947 Bernie Leadon of the music group ‘Flying Burrito Brothers’ was born

1996 Mervyn Hugh Cowie R.I.P. Cowie was a British wildlife conservationist, founder and director of Kenya’s Royal National Parks.

July 19th is National Daiquiri Day

Posted on July 19, 2016

High-res version

Five Food Finds about Daiquiris:

  1. The Daiquiri cocktail, made of rum, lime juice and sugar, takes its name from the village and iron mines of Daiquiri near Santiago, Cuba, where the cocktail  originated around 1900.
  2. It was named either by American engineers working there, or by the U.S. troops who arrived there in 1898.
  3.  At least one source claims it did not appear until after World War I.
  4. Thirsty partygoers and responsible parents lookin’ for a frosty, fruity thrill can find drive-thru strawberry daiquiri stands just about anywhere in New Orleans.
  5. Drive-thrus now limit customers to only one straw per visit, and they can no longer pack adult-strength strawberry daiquiris with kids’ meals.

Today’s Food History

on this day in…

1104 Flitch Day. A married couple who can prove to a mock court with a jury of bachelors and maidens, that they have ‘not wished themselves unwed,’ are awarded a ‘flitch’ of bacon (half a pig). The origins of this custom are in Dunmow, Essex, England, details are not certain, but references to it go back to 1104. It has been a regular civic event in Dunmow since 1855. Now held every 4 years, and frequently televised.

1863 Curtis Fletcher Marbut was born. An American geologist and one of the founders of modern soil science. He was with the U.S. Bureau of Soils for 25 years.

1947 Bernie Leadon of the music group ‘Flying Burrito Brothers’ was born

1996 Mervyn Hugh Cowie R.I.P. Cowie was a British wildlife conservationist, founder and director of Kenya’s Royal National Parks.

May 2 is National Chocolate Mousse Day

Posted on May 2, 2015

Here are today’s five things to know about Chocolate Mousse

  1. The word mousse is French and translates as “froth” or “foam.”
  2. Cold dessert mousses are often poured into decorative glasses and garnished with fruit, sweet sauces, or whipped cream.
  3. Savory mousses can be made from fish, shellfish, meat, foie gras, etc.
  4. There are three key constituents to a mousse: base, binder, and aerator.
  5. They may be hot or cold and are often squeezed through a piping bag onto some kind of platform to be used as hors d’oeuvres.

Fun Fact:

Savory mousse dishes were an 18th century French achievement. Dessert mousses (generally fruit mousses) began to appear much later, in the second half of the 19th century.

The first written record of chocolate mousse in the United States comes from a Food Exposition held at Madison Square Garden in New York City in 1892.

Chocolate mousse came into the public eye in the U.S. in the 1930s, about the time as chocolate pudding mixes were introduced.

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1878 At 7 a.m., the Washburn A flour mill in Minneapolis exploded, sending the roof 500 feet in the air. 18 workers were killed and seven other flour mills were also destroyed.
  • 1885 Good Housekeeping magazine begins publication. Founded by Clark W. Bryan, the magazine was purchased by Hearst publishing in 1911.
  • 1934 Sergey Vasilyevich Lebedev died. A Russian chemist who developed a method for large scale production of synthetic rubber. Production of polybutadiene was begun in 1932 using potatoes and limestone as raw materials.

dvdr1 2

April 9 is National Chinese Almond Cookie Day

Posted on April 9, 2015

breadetbutter.wordpress.com

breadetbutter.wordpress.com

Here are today’s five thing to know about Chinese Almond Cookies

  1. In Mandarin Chinese, these are more literally called “Almond Cakes.”
  2. The Chinese Almond Cookie is native to southern and southeast China.
  3. There is no record of these cookies before the 1900’s.
  4. The Chinese commonly prepared Almond milk and Almond tea.
  5. An American variation exists using pecans.

Fun Fact:

Typical to southern and southeastern China, these almond cookies are usually enjoyed around Chinese New Year, and are given as gifts to family and friends.

In some Chinese restaurants, they are served to cleanse the palate after several courses, rather than being regarded as a dessert.

Yuan-Shan Chi declared these cookies “as Chinese as blueberry pie.”

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1626 R.I.P. Sir Francis Bacon. An English statesman, philosopher and author of ‘Novum Organum’, a work on scientific inquiry. Some also claim he wrote the plays attributed to Shakespeare. He died after having stuffed a dressed chicken with snow to see how long the flesh could be preserved by the extreme cold. He caught cold and died from complications about a month later.
  • 1682 Rene-Robert Cavelier, Sieur de La Salle discovered the mouth of the Mississippi River and claimed the whole Mississippi Basin for France. He named it Louisiana, in honor of Louis XIV of France.
  • 1770 Capt. James Cook discovered Botany Bay on the Australian continent.
  • 1850 R.I.P William Prout.  An English chemist, he was the first to classify food components into 3 main divisions – carbohydrates, fats and proteins.
  • 1872 Samuel R. Percy of New York received a patent for dried milk.
  • 1965 The entire cast of the comic strip ‘Peanuts’ was featured on the cover of TIME magazine

dvdr1 2

March 31 is Oysters on the Half Shell Day

Posted on March 31, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Oyster:

  1. An oyster has a lifespan of over 100 years.
  2. The oyster has no head, no biting mouth parts and no arms or legs.
  3. An oysters two or three inches in diameter would probably be three to five years old.
  4. It takes about 25 to 28 months for oyster larvae to reach market size.
  5. Oysters feed year-round, though they feed less in winter because they need less energy.

Fun Fact:

All shelled fish should be alive when you eat them raw.  If they’re dead (closed), toss them back.

There are over 5,000 different species of oyster world wide.

 The flavor and color of oysters is influenced by the sand or sediment and the waters that they live in.

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1814 John Lineback patented the cottonseed hulling machine.
  • 1848 William Waldorf Astor was born. William Waldorf Astor was a cousin of John Jacob Astor IV, the great grandson of John Jacob Astor. He built the Waldorf section (1893) of what would become the Waldorf Astoria (1897). The Empire State Building (1929) now stands on the site of the former hotel.
  • 1918 Daylight Savings Time went into effect in the U.S. for the first time.
  • 1989 Chefs from Japanese restaurants in New York have finally persuaded the FDA to allow them to import and serve fogu. The first shipment of Japanese blowfish (tora fugu) arrived today. The chefs had to attend special classes to protect their customers from poisoning.
  • 1946 G. Allan Nichol of the music group ‘The Turtles’ was born.
  • 2005 Frank Perdue president of Perdue Farms died today. He was the son of the company’s founder Arthur Perdue. Perdue is the 3rd largest poultry company in the U.S. 

dvdr1 2

March 28 is National Black Forest Cake Day

Posted on March 28, 2015

mybestrecipes.eu

mybestrecipes.eu

Here are today’s five thing to know about Black Forest Cake:

  1. Typically, Black Forest cake consists of several layers of chocolate cake, with whipped cream and cherries between each layer.
  2. In some European traditions sour cherries are used both between the layers and for decorating the top.
  3. Traditionally, Kirschwasser (a clear liquor distilled from tart cherries) is added to the cake, although other liquors are also used
  4. The cake is named not directly after the Black Forest (Schwarzwald) mountain range in southwestern Germany but rather from the specialty liquor of that region, known as Schwarzwälder Kirsch(wasser) and distilled from tart cherries.
  5. Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte was first mentioned in writing in 1934.

Fun Fact:

The record for the world’s largest authentic black forest cake, weighing 3000 kg, was set at Europa Park, Germany on 16 July 2006, by K&D Bakery.

In the history of black forest cake, it was not in the form of a cake but instead as a dessert recipe.

The forests in “Hansel and Gretel”, “Snow White”, and “Rapunzel” are based on the Black Forest. They are all German fairy tales.

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1797 The first U.S. patent for a ‘washing machine’ was issued (possibly to Nathaniel Briggs).  It was called a scrub board or wash board.
  • 1819 Sir Joseph William Bazalgette was born.  A British civil engineer, he designed the main sewer system for London.
  • 1897 Victor Mills was born.  He was a chemical engineer who worked for Proctor & Gamble.  He improved Duncan Hines cake mixes, improved Jif peanut butter, and invented Pampers disposable diapers.
  • 1968 ‘Whiskey On A Sunday’ was recorded by the Irish Rovers.
  • 1996 John Leonard submitted an order form along with ‘Pepsi Points’ and a check to Pepsi for a Harrier Jump Jet.  The Harrier had been featured in a Pepsi commercial as one of the items that could be redeemed for ‘points,’ or a combination of cash and points. Pepsi subsequently refused to send Leonard the Harrier Jump Jet (actual cost: $23 million).  Leonard then sued, and finally a judge ruled that the Harrier Jump Jet had obviously been mentioned in the promotion as a joke.

dvdr1 2

%d bloggers like this: