Posts tagged “wordpress

April 1 is Soylent Green Day: “For the people, by the people.”

Posted on March 31, 2018

 

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Interesting Food Facts about Soylent Green

  1. Soylent Green, introduced 1966, is usually considered the original “green” food.
  2. It was first marketed as a, “Miracle food of high-energy plankton gathered from the oceans of the world.”
  3. Throughout the years the company has adopted many slogans:
    • “Food for the people, by the people.”
    • “Make room, make room for green.”
    • “It’s easy being green.”
    • “You’re in good hands with Soylent.”
  4. You can find many recipes for homemade Soylent Green, but there’s nothing like the real thing.
  5. It is said that Charlton Heston was this snack’s #1 fan, keeping mass quantities in his home.

Fun Fact:

The Soylent Green Biscuit Co. is planning on world distribution by 2022.

The Soylent Green Biscuit Co’s famous snack has been a cult classic since its inception in 1973.  People everywhere were delighted to have this affordable snack that “tastes just like grandmas.”

Charlton Heston says that, “When April 1st heralds the coming of Spring, I always think fondly of Soylent Green.”

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Today’s Food History

  • 1582 France adopted the new Gregorian calendar.  Prior to that, the new year was celebrated on April 1.
  • 1755 Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin was born.  In his books, dining is treated as an art form and contains many delightful and witty observations on the pleasures of the table.
  • 1893 The first dishwashing machine became an award winning success at the 1893 Columbian Exposition, which used Josephine Garis Cochran’s hand operated, mechanical dishwashers in its kitchens.  (She patented her original version on December 28, 1886.)  Her company eventually evolved into KitchenAid.
  • 1911 Seaman Asahel Knapp died.  An American agriculturist, he began the system which evolved into the U.S. Cooperative Extension Service.
  • 1932 Actor Gordon Jump was born.  The ‘Maytag Repairman’ in commercials, also Arthur Carlson on ‘WKRP in Cincinnati’
  • 1960 Tiros I, the first weather observation satellite was launched from Cape Kennedy.
  • 1976 Jimmy Buffet’s ‘Margaritaville’ was released.
  • 1976 Carl Peter Henrik Dam died. Dam was a Danish biochemist who discovered vitamin K in 1939.
  • 1994 Ray Geiger died (born Sept 18, 1910).  Editor of theFarmers’ Almanac from 1934-1993, and editor of American Farm & Home Almanac from 1964-1990.
  • 1996 The Taco Bell fast food chain played an April Food joke on the American public by claiming to have bought the Liberty Bell to help pay down the national debt
  • 1999 The first minimum wage goes into effect in Britain, £3.60 an hour for adults and £3.00 an hour for those under 22 years old.
  • 1999 In April 1999, Restaurant Nora in Washington DC became America’s first certified organic restaurant.  This means that 95% or more of everything that you eat at the restaurant has been produced by certified organic growers and farmers.

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April 23 is National Picnic Day

Posted on April 23, 2016

 

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Here are today’s five things to know about Picnic

  1. Did you know that a “picnic” ham is really not a true ham? It is cut from the upper part of the foreleg of a pig – a true ham is cut from the hind leg.
  2. Italy’s favourite picnic day is Easter Monday. It is called “Angel’s Monday” or Pasquetta (“Little Easter”).
  3. After an ant has visited your picinc, it lays down a scent as it returns to the nest for the other ants to follow!
  4. In the year 2000, a 600-mile-long picnic took place in France to celebrate the first Bastille Day of the new millennium.
  5. The first table designed specifically for picnics (in a style similar to what we know today) appeared in the late 1800s.

Fun Fact:

In the first half of the 19th century, a Picnic Society met in London at the Pantheon, a place of public entertainment in Oxford Street.

The French started the modern fashion for picnics when they opened their royal parks to the public after the revolution of 1789.

The 1955 film Picnic, with William Holden and Kim Novak, was nominated for six Oscars and won two for best art direction and best film editing.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1564 and 1616 William Shakespeare was born. He passed away on the same date 52 years later. There are many references to food in Shakespeare’s works. “Let the sky rain potatoes.” (‘The Merry Wives of Windsor’). “Tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers.” (‘Romeo and Juliet’).
  • 1895 Purdy and Peters were issued a patent for a “design for spoons.”
  • 1947 Glenn Cornick of the music group ‘Jethro Tull’ was born.
  • 1982 The Conch Republic (Key West & the Florida Keys) seceded from the United States to protest an INS (Immigration & Naturalization Service) roadblock on the only road into the Keys.
  • 1985 Coca-Cola announced it was changing its 99 year old secret formula. New Coke was a big flop.
  • 1992 The first McDonald’s in Beijing, China opened. It is the world’s largest McDonald’s, with 28,000 square feet, seating for 700 and 1,000 employees.
  • 1993 R.I.P. Cesar Chavez. He was the founder of the United Farm Workers Union.

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May 7 is National Leg of Lamb Day

Posted on May 7, 2015

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For decades May 7 has been a day to celebrate leg of lamb,

the most popular cut of lamb in North America

 Today’s five things to know about Lamb

  1. The oldest organized industry is raising sheep.
  2. The average American eats less than a pound of lamb a year
  3. All American Lamb is hormone free and American Lamb can be offered as all-natural products that are antibiotic free.
  4. This meat generally is more tender than that from older sheep and appears more often on tables in some Western countries.
  5. Lamb should be stored in the refrigerator or freezer immediately after purchasing. Refrigerate fresh lamb at 40 degrees or below.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1660 Isaack B. Fubine of The Hague received a patent for macaroni.
  • (This fact is reported on many sites on the internet. No one has any further information listed, and I am in doubt as to its accuracy).
  • 1873 Salmon Portland Chase died. He was Secretary of the Treasury under Abraham Lincoln, and later Chief Justice.
  • 1947 The ‘Kraft Television Theater’ premiered on NBC TV
  • 1953 The world record swordfish was caught in Chile: 1,182 pounds.
  • 1987 Shelly Long, who played Diane Chambers, makes her final appearance as a regular on ‘Cheers.’

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May 6 is National Crepe Suzette Day

Posted on May 6, 2015

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Today’s five things to know about Crepe Suzette

  1. The most common way to make Crêpe Suzette is to pour liqueur (usually Grand Marnier) over a freshly-cooked crêpe with sugar and light it.
  2. This will make the alcohol in the liqueur evaporate, resulting in a fairly thick, caramelised sauce. In a restaurant, a Crêpe Suzette is often prepared in a chafing dish in full view of the guests.
  3. The origin of the dish and its name is somewhat disputed. One claim is that the dish was created out of a mistake made by a fourteen year-old assistant waiter Henri Charpentier in 1895 at the Maitre at Monte Carlo’s Café de Paris. He was preparing a dessert for the Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII of the United Kingdom, whose guests included a beautiful French girl named Suzette.
  4. Different sources (like the Larousse Gastronomique) however doubt that Charpentier was serving the prince instead of the head waiter because he would have been too young.
  5. The other claim states Crêpes Suzette was named in honor of French actress Suzanne Reichenberg (1853–1924), who worked professionally under the name Suzette.

Fun Fact:

In the early days of the crepe, white flour was an expensive product, reserved only for royalty that why savory crepes were traditionaly made with buckweat , a esay to grow plant..

 Crepe is the French word for pancake.  Crepes differ from traditional pancakes in that they are lighter, thinner and are utilized in both sweet and savory dishes. 

Unlike pancake batter where some lumps are of no consequence, crepe batter must be smooth and more fluid, like the consistency of heavy cream.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1806 Chapin Aaron Harris was born. He was cofounder of the first dental school in the world, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery.
  • 1833 John Deere developed the first steel plow.
  • 1851 John Gorrie patented an ice making machine, the first U.S. patent for a mechanical refrigerator.
  • 1862 RIP Henry David Thoreau, American author, philosopher, and naturalist. Author of ‘Walden; or, Life in the Woods.’
  • 1898 Daniel Gerber of baby food fame was born.
  • 1905 Toots Shor, restaurateur was born.
  • 1940 John Steinbeck receives the Pulitzer Prize for his novel ‘The Grapes of Wrath.’
  • 1959 Icelandic gunboats fired on British trawlers during their ‘Cod War’ over fishing rights

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May 5 is National Enchilada Day

Posted on May 5, 2015

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Today’s five things to know about Enchilada

  1. The enchilada is one of the dishes mentioned in Mexico’s first cookbook in 1831.
  2. Enchilada is the past participle of Spanish enchilar, “to add chile pepper to”, literally to “season (or decorate) with chile.”
  3. Enchiladas originated in Mexico, where the practice of rolling tortillas around other food dates back at least to Mayan times.
  4. Writing at the time of the Spanish conquistadors, Bernal Díaz del Castillo documented a feast enjoyed by Europeans hosted by Hernán Cortés in Coyoacán, which included foods served in corn tortillas.
  5. In the 19th century, as Mexican cuisine was being memorialized, enchiladas were mentioned in the first Mexican cookbook, El cocinero mexicano (“The Mexican Chef”), published in 1831, and in Mariano Galvan Rivera’s Diccionario de Cocina, published in 1845.

Fun Fact:

Enchiladas appeared in an English language cookbook in 1914 titled, California Mexican-Spanish Cookbook written by Bertha Haffner Ginger.

In Costa Rica, the enchilada is a common, small, spicy pastry made with puff pastry and filled with diced potatoes spiced with a common variation of tabasco sauce or other similar sauces.

In Honduras, enchiladas is called tostada. They are not corn tortillas rolled around a filling, but instead are flat, fried, corn tortillas topped with ground beef, salad toppings, a tomato sauce, and crumbled or shredded cheese.  

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1865 Nellie Bly (Elizabeth Jane Cochran) was born. In 1889 Bly successfully completed an attempt to beat the record of Jules Verne’s fictional Phileas Fogg to go ‘Around the World in Eighty Days’. Bly was a U.S. newspaper reporter and completed the journey in 72 days, 6 hours, 11 minutes and 14 seconds.
  • 1903 James Beard, culinary expert and cookbook author was born. Quote: “The kitchen, reasonably enough, was the scene of my first gastronomic adventure. I was on all fours. I crawled into the vegetable bin, settled on a giant onion and ate it, skin and all. It must have marked me for life, for I have never ceased to love the hearty flavor of raw onions”.
  • 1926 Ann B. Davis was born. She played the role of Alice the housekeeper and cook on the TV show ‘The Brady Bunch’ (1969-1974).
  • 1936 A patent was granted for the first bottle with a screw cap to Edward Ravenscroft of Glencoe, Illinois.

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May 4 is National Hoagie Day

Posted on May 4, 2015

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Today’s five things to know about Hoagie

  1. The original “hoagie” is what is now referred to as an “Italian Hoagie” which includes a variety of traditional Italian lunch meats, including dry salami, mortadella, capicolla, and provolone served with lettuce, tomato and onions with a light vinegar and oil dressing.
  2. Former Philadelphia mayor (also once Pennsylvania governor) Ed Rendell declared the hoagie the “Official Sandwich of Philadelphia”.
  3. Most hoagie shops offer single-meat hoagies (for example, ham or salami hoagies) as well as premium hoagies with upscale ingredients: prosciutto, imported Italian lunchmeats (cotechino, mortadella, sopressata, etc.). A popular variant is the grinder or cosmo, which is essentially a hoagie that has been toasted under a broiler.
  4. Many takeout shops in Chicago sell a “hoagy” (sic.), usually containing steak and other ingredients, with the option of being “heated.” They also sell cheesesteak, referred to most often as “Philly Steak.”
  5. In many areas the default cheese on a hoagie is Provolone, while in others it is white American cheese. Cheese-only hoagies (Provolone, American, or Mixed) replace the meat with extra slices of cheese.

Fun Fact:

Hoagie was declared the “Official Sandwich of Philadelphia” in 1992. 

The most widely accepted story of hoagie’s origin centers on an area of Philadelphia known as Hog Island, which was home to a shipyard during World War I (1914-1918). 

During the late 1930s, DePalma joined forces with Buccelli’s Bakery and developed the perfect hoagie roll (an eight-inch roll that became the standard for the modern-day hoagie).

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1494 Columbus landed at Jamaica and met the Arawak Indians. The Arawak used Jamaican pimento (allspice) to season and smoke meat (usually pigs), the foundation upon which Jamaican Jerk developed.
  • 1854 Asa Fitch was appointed as New York state entomologist, the first such in the U.S. He studied insects and their effects on agricultural crops.
  • 1942 War time food rationing began in the U.S.

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April 30 is National Raisin Day

Posted on April 30, 2015

Here are today’s five things to know about Raisin

  1. In 1873, a freak hot spell withered the grapes on the vine. One enterprising San Francisco grocer advertised these shriveled grapes as “Peruvian Delicacies” and the rest is history. 
  2. It takes more than 4 tons of grapes to produce 1 ton of raisins.
  3. The finest raisins come from Malaga in Spain.
  4. Raisin – comes from the Latin racemus and means “a cluster of grapes or berries”.
  5. Fresno, California is the Raisin Capital of the World.

Fun Fact:

Raisin colors vary by drying process. For example, a dark purplish/black raisin is sun-dried. A light to medium brown raisin is mechanically dehydrated in special drying tunnels. A golden to bright yellow raisin is mechanically dried and treated with sulfur dioxide to retain color and a green raisin is dried by air in adobe houses.

Golden raisins are made by treating the raisins with a lye solution, sometimes with lye and then burning sulfur, and sometimes with sulfur dioxide.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1792 John Montague, 4th Earl of Sandwich died. Captain Cook named the Sandwich Islands after him (now known as Hawaii). He is supposed to have invented the sandwich as a quick meal so as not to interrupt his gambling sessions.
  • 1904 The Louisiana Purchase Exposition opened in St. Louis (St. Louis World’s Fair). It was at the Fair that the ice cream cone was supposed to have been invented. The hot dog and iced tea were also popularized at the Fair.
  • 1952 Mr. Potato Head is introduced to the world. Mr. Potato Head is the also the first toy to be advertised on television.
  • 1955 ‘Cherry Pink & Apple Blossom White’ by Perez Prado hits number one on the charts.
  • 1981 Dunkin Donuts opened its first store in the Philippines.

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April 29 is National Shrimp Scampi Day

Posted on April 29, 2015

damndelicious.net

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Here are today’s five things to know about Shrimp Scampi

  1. The word “scampi” means “shrimp”.  Therefore, “shrimp scampi” is “shrimp shrimp” (or “scampi scampi”).
  2. The pistol shrimp can deliver an explosive attack hotter than the surface of the sun and loud enough to rupture a human ear drum.
  3. Every shrimp is actually born male, and some develop into females.
  4. Some shrimp are actually capable of glowing in the dark.
  5. Shrimp can vary in size from 1/2 inch to 12 inches.

Fun Fact:

One billion pounds of shrimp are eaten every year by Americans.
The name for raw, uncooked shrimp is “green”.
Every shrimp is actually born a male and then become females as they mature.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1768 Georg Brandt died. A Swedish chemist, he discovered the element cobalt in 1730. Cobalt is used in steel making, and is an essential part of vitamin B12
  • 1856 A shipment of 33 camels arrived at the Texas port of Indianola. They had been purchased on the North African Coast, for the U.S. army to use in the deserts of the Southwest.
  • 1913 The zipper was patented by Gideon Sundback. Most checked chefs pants still have buttons.
  • 1988 McDonald’s announced it will be opening 20 Moscow restaurants. They will serve Bolshoi Mak instead of Big Macs.
  • 1989 Donald Deskey died. An industrial designer, he designed the packaging for Tide laundry detergent and Crest toothpaste among others.

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April 28 is National Blueberry Pie Day

Posted on April 28, 2015

Here are today’s five things to know about Blueberry

  1. Blueberries are one of the only natural foods that are truly blue in color.
  2. The pale, powder-like protective coating on the skin of blueberries is called “bloom.”
  3. A blueberry extract diet improves balance, coordination, and short-term memory in aging rats.
  4. Blueberries are the official berries of Nova Scotia, Canada.
  5. The anthocyanin present in blueberries is good for eyesight.

Fun Fact:

The U.S. is the world’s largest producer of blueberries, harvesting a total of 564.4 million pounds of cultivated and wild blueberries in 2012.  

Blueberries can be harvested by gently shaking a bush and catching the falling berries.

Blueberries don’t ripen after they have been picked.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1789 The most famous mutiny in history took place on the English ship, ‘Bounty’, against Captain William Bligh. The ship was sailing to Tahiti to bring back breadfruit trees.
  • 1796 ‘American Cookery’ by Amelia Simmons is published in Hartford. It is the first cookbook written by an American. This is one of the classic cookbooks that can be found on the Food Reference Website.
  • 1899 The comedy short ‘Stealing a Dinner’ was filmed by cameraman G.W. ‘Billy’ Bitzer for the American Mutoscope and Biograph Company. (Mutoscope were ‘peephole’ motion pictures on cards mounted on a rotating drum turned by hand.)
  • 1940 Italian operatic soprano, Louisia Tetrazzini, died. Chicken Tetrazzini, created by an American chef (San Francisco?), was named in her honor.
  • 1944 Alice Waters was born. Executive Chef and Owner of Chez Panisse Restaurant, opened in 1971 in Berkeley, California
  • 1953 Howard C. Rossin was issued a patent for an overcoat built for two (or Siamese Twins).
  • 2005 Loaded Burrito Scare: Clovis, New Mexicao police were called to a middle school when someone saw what appeared to be a weapon being carried in by a student. Police did not find any weapon, but finally an 8th grader realized that what someone had seen was his extra credit commercial advertising project – a 30 inch long steak burrito wrapped in tin foil and a T-Shirt.

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April 27 is National Prime Rib Day

Posted on April 27, 2015

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Interesting Food Facts about Prime Rib

  1. A standing rib roast is a prime rib consisting of SEVEN ribs.
  2. A scooped & tied standing rib roast will have the bones taken off and then tied back on.
  3. A rib eye roast is a boneless prime rib.
  4. The beef is cut from the rib section, the largest central area of the steer, located in between the chuck and the short loin, just above the plate.
  5. If choosing a prime rib at the butcher, look for a cut that has a bright color and milky white fat.

Fun Fact:

“Au Jus” refers to the drippings that come off the meat during cooking, and it is often served alongside the prime rib.

The prime rib comes from ribs 6-12 of the cow.

Prime rib cooking temperatures are: rare:120°-125°, medium rare: 130°-135°, medium:140°-145° and well done:160°.

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Today’s Food History

  • 1773 The British Parliament passed the ‘Tea Act,’ one of the events that led to the American Revolution.
  • 1865 Cornell University was chartered. Cornell is an agricultural land grant university endowed by Ezra Cornell, one of the founders of Western Union Telegraph Co. Today, Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, offers many programs, including Agricultural and Life Sciences, Hotel Administration, and Nutritional Sciences.
  • 1871 The American Museum of Natural History in New York City was opened to the public.
  • 1902 Julius Sterling Morton died. He was the founder of Arbor Day, first observed in Nebraska on April 10, 1872. Over one million trees were planted.
  • 1947 Pete Ham of the rock group Badfinger was born.
  • 1965 R. C. Duncan was granted a patent for ‘Pampers’ disposable diapers.
  • 1995 On ‘Seinfeld’ Kramer began sculpting with pasta.

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April 26 is National Pretzel Day

Posted on April 26, 2015

Today’s five things to know about Pretzel

  1. The first pretzel was created in 610 A.D. by a monk in southern France or northern Italy. It was originally called a ‘pretiola’ and was renamed ‘pretzel’ later when the idea migrated to Germany and Austria.
  2.  In 1861, pretzel twisting was the second highest-paying job in the Philadelphia region. Today, machines do the twisting, although at some artisan shops, tourists can still see it done the old-fashioned way.
  3. The birthplace of the hard pretzel was Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The pretzel, or bretzel as it was called then, first came to America in 1710 with Palatine German immigrants (from the Rhineland) who settled in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania and became known, incorrectly, as the “Pennsylvania Dutch.”
  4.  In the 18th century, German children would wear pretzel necklaces at the beginning of a new year for prosperity, health and good fortune.
  5. In the 17th century, pretzels were known as a marriage knot. During a wedding ceremony, a couple would wish upon a pretzel, break it (like a wishbone), and eat it to signify their oneness. It is speculated that the term, “tying the knot,” originated in Switzerland in 1614 during a wedding between two prominent families.

Fun Fact:

In a prayer book used by Catherine of Cleves in 1440, there was a picture of St. Bartholomew surrounded by pretzels. By this time, pretzels were considered a sign of good luck and spiritual wholeness—possibly due to the three holes in the common pretzel shape touted to represent the Holy Trinity at this point.

Pretzels have long been integrated into the Christian faith. By the 16th century, it had become tradition to eat pretzels on Good Friday in Germany, and Catholics once considered them the “official food of lent.”

The largest ever pretzel was 40 pounds, baked by Philadelphia resident Joe Nacchio. The baked good was 5 feet across.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1785 John James Audubon was born. Ornithologist, naturalist and artist, known mainly for his paintings and sketches of North American birds.
  • 1877 Minnesota held a state day of prayer to plead for an end to a 4 year plague of Rocky Mountain locusts. In southwestern Minnesota, locusts had been eating crops, trees, tobacco, fence posts, leather, dead animals, sheep’s wool – everything but the mortgage. Two days later a snowstorm moved through and the locusts were never seen again. No one knows what caused the locust plague, nor why the Rocky Mountain locust became extinct after the plague.
  • 1947 Pete Ham of the music group ‘Badfinger’ was born
  • 1962 ‘Mashed Potato Time’ by Dee Dee Sharp is #1 on the charts.
  • 1986 Chernobyl nuclear plant in the Ukraine explodes. The worst nuclear disaster in history. In addition to the human toll, agriculture  and livestock was contaminated by radiation in large areas of Europe for years to come.
  • 1989 Lucille Ball died. Two of the funniest food related comedy routines ever done were the chocolate factory and the grape stomping episodes from her TV show, ‘I Love Lucy.’
  • 2005 A herd of buffalo escaped from a farm and wandered around a Baltimore, Maryland suburb disrupting traffic, and shutting down several major highways. Police eventually herded them onto a nearby tennis court.
  • 2006 Chicago banned the sale of foie gras.

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April 25 is National Zucchini Bread Day

Posted on April 25, 2015

Here are today’s five things to know about Zucchini Bread

  1. A zucchini has more potassium than a banana.
  2. The word zucchini comes from ‘zucca’ the Italian word for squash.
  3. Biggest is NOT best. The most flavorful zucchinis are small- to medium-sized.
  4. According to World’s Healthiest Foods Nutrition info, nutrients and vitamins found in zucchini can help prevent cancer and heart disease.
  5. The flower of the zucchini plant is also edible.

Fun Fact:

The world’s largest zucchini on record was 69 1/2 inches long, and weighed 65 lbs. Bernard Lavery of Plymouth Devon, UK, grew the humongous veggie.

Mild bitterness in zucchini, like that in related species like cucumbers, may be result from environmental factors such as high temperature, low moisture, low soil nutrients, etc. The bitterness is caused by compounds called cucurbitacins.

A zucchini has more potassium than a banana.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1856 Charles Luttwedge Dodgson met a little girl named Alice Liddell. Alice had a penchant for consuming unknown (and apparently psychoactive) food, pills and liquids that she found while exploring a very large rabbit hole.
  • 1932 Meadowlark Lemon, basketball star, was born.
  • 1945 Stu Cook of the music group ‘Creedence Clearwater Revival’ was born.
  • 1959 The St. Lawrence Seaway opened. It connects the Great Lakes with the Atlantic Ocean. Its completion opened the heart of Americas industrial and agricultural areas to ocean going vessels for shipping. (The official opening ceremony is June 26)

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April 24 is National Pigs-in-a-Blanket Day

Posted on April 24, 2015

 

Here are today’s five things to know about Pigs-in-a-Blanket

  1. The first written record of pigs in a blanket occurs in Betty Crocker’s Cooking for Kids in 1957.
  2. Pigs in a blanket are also known as devils on horsebacks, kilted sausages, and wiener winks.
  3. In the United Kingdom, pigs in blankets are small sausages, or chipolatas wrapped up in bacon.
  4. In America, pigs in a blanket often refers to hot dogs, Vienna sausages, or breakfast sausages wrapped in biscuit dough, croissant dough or a pancake and then baked.
  5. You can combine these dishes by wrapping your sausage in bacon, then cooking them into a biscuit or croissant.

Fun Fact:

Pigs in a blanket are usually different from sausage rolls, which are a larger, more filling item served for breakfast and lunch in parts of Europe, Australia, New Zealand, and, more rarely, the United States and Canada.

The name can also refer to klobasnek (a kind of kolache filled with sausage or ham slices). The German Würstchen im Schlafrock (“sausage in a dressing gown“) uses sausages wrapped in puff pastryor, more rarely, pancakes. Cheese and bacon are sometimes present.

In Russia, this dish is named Сосиска в тесте (Sosiska v teste, “sausage in dough“).

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1766 Robert Bailey Thomas was born. He was the founder and long time editor of the ‘Farmer’s Almanac’ now known as the ‘Old Farmer’s Almanac.’
  • 1833 Jacob Ebert and George Dulty patented the first soda fountain.
  • 1914 Justin Wilson, Cajun chef and humorist was born. He wrote five cookbooks, hosted several cooking shows, including ‘Louisiana Cookin’ and ‘Cookin’ Cajun.’
  • 1949 Chocolate rationing ended in Britain.
  • 1994 The world’s largest lollipop, 3,011 pounds, is made in Denmark.

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April 22 is National Jelly Bean Day

Posted on April 22, 2015

Here are today’s five things to know about Jelly Bean

  1. They were President Reagan’s favorite candy and he used them to help him quit smoking when he was the governor of California.
  2. Each year in the U.S, there are 16 billion jelly beans manufactured just for Easter.  This is enough to circle the Earth more than 3 times if they were laid end to end.
  3. The jelly bean is associated with Easter because of its egg-like shape.
  4. In the early 20th century, a “jelly-bean” was slang for a man of style and no substance.
  5. They were the first candy to be sold by weight rather than by piece.

Fun Fact:

The first jelly bean was created by an unknown American candy maker in the 1800s. An 1861 advertisement recommended sending jelly beans to soldiers fighting in the Civil War.

The original eight flavors of Jelly Belly beans introduced in 1976 were Very Cherry, Root Beer, Cream Soda, Tangerine, Green Apple, Lemon, Licorice and Grape.

Jelly Belly beans were the first jelly beans in outer space when President Reagan sent them on the 1983 flight of the space shuttle Challenger.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1662 John Tradescant died. He succeeded his father as naturalist and gardener to Charles I. 1818 Cadwallader C. Washburn is born in Livermore, Maine. In 1866 he built a flour mill at St. Anthony Falls, Minnesota and his Washburn-Crosby Co. (forerunner of General Mills) would market Gold Medal flour.
  • 1832 Julius Sterling Morton was born. He was the founder of Arbor Day, first observed in Nebraska on April 10, 1872. Over one million trees were planted.
  • 1889 The U.S. opened Oklahoma to homesteaders and the Oklahoma land rush officially began at 12 noon.
  • 1913 Thomas Wright of New Jersey patented a method to load ice on to refrigerator railroad cars.
  • 1948 Prosper Montagne died. Montagne was one of the great French chefs of all time. He is mainly remembered as the creator of Larousse Gastronomique (1938), a comprehensive encyclopedia of French gastronomy.
  • 1964 The New York World’s Fair opens in Flushing Meadows on the same site as the 1939 World’s Fair. I had my first Heineken beer at their exhibition there. As a matter of fact, I spent every weekend there from April to October for the 2 years the Fair was open. I sampled music, food, beer and wine from around the world, and it helped to inspire my interest in cooking and food history.
  • 1970 The first Earth Day was celebrated. Is our environment better or worse today?
  • 1996 Erma Bombeck died. Writer, humorist, you will find some of her quotes about family and food on the Food Reference website.

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April 21 is National Chocolate-Covered Cashews Day

Posted on April 21, 2015

 

Here are today’s five things to know about Cashews

  1. Pistachio, mango, cashew and poison ivy are in the same family.
  2. Cashews are native to Costa Rica and Central America. The fresh cashew nut has a substance inside that produce a big burn and rash in skin and mouth, at the same time this is a highly valuable product known as Cashew Nut Shell Liquid or CNSL, ingredient that have special structural features for transformation into specialty chemicals and high value polymers, this is important considering the fact that, since this is a renewable resource, is better than synthetics.
  3. One thing is the cashew nut and a different thing is the cashew apple, this last one is a kind of fruit to which it’s attached the nut, this fleshy fruit has an aroma some people love while others dislike, the most common way of preparation of this fruit is doing a tasteful juice mixed with water and sugar.
  4. Cashews in Costa Rica are harvested during March and April.
  5. A quite interesting experience is to burn in wood fire a raw cashew nut, this CNSL is highly flammable and while it burns produces impressive tiny explosions. Kids shouldn’t try this without parent’s supervision.  Gases and fumes can also irritate, so this experiment should be done in open spaces.

Fun Fact:

 India is the world’s largest producer of cashews, with Brazil second and Africa a distant third.

 While high in fat, cashews actually contain less fat than other mass-produced nuts, such as almond and walnuts, and the amount of dietary fiber contained make them a good food for weight loss when eaten in moderation.

Cashews have a high fat content, which means that if they are left at room temperature, they won’t stay fresh for long.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1838 John Muir was born. Muir was a naturalist who was largely responsible for the establishment of Sequoia and Yosemite national parks in California in 1890.
  • 1878 The White House hosted the first Easter Egg Roll. Previously, the activities had been held on the Capitol grounds. Congress passed a law banning the practice due to a limited maintenance and landscaping budget (Bah humbug!). President Rutherford B. Hayes was asked if children could hold the activities on the South Lawn of the White House and he enthusiastically agreed. The event has been held there ever since.
  • 1910 R.I.P. Samuel Langhorne Clemens (Mark Twain. American author, pen name Mark Twain, who wrote ‘Tom Sawyer’, ‘Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,’ etc. There are many quotes and descriptions about food and dining in his works (and on FoodReference.com). An example is: “A man accustomed to American food and American domestic cookery would not starve to death suddenly in Europe, but I think he would gradually waste away, and eventually die.” (From ‘A Tramp Abroad’).
  • 1962 The Top Of The Needle restaurant in the Seattle, Washington Space Needle, was officially opened. It was the second revolving restaurant in the U.S. It seats 260 and rotates completely once every hour. (The world’s first revolving restaurant was the La Ronde Restaurant built in 1961 atop the Ala Moana building fronting the Ala Moana shopping center. The restaurant has since closed down.)
  • 1963 The Beatles and the Rolling Stones met for the first time at the Crawdaddy Club.

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April 20 is National Pineapple Upside Down Cake Day

Posted on April 20, 2015

Here are today’s five things to know about Pineapple Upside-Down Cake

  1. The term ‘upside down cake’ wasn’t used very much before the middle of the 19th century, but the style of baking probably dates back much further, probably to the Middle Ages.
  2. The early recipes for fruit upside down cakes were made in cast iron skillets on top of the stove.
  3. The classic American ‘Pineapple Upside Down Cake’ dates to sometime after 1903, when Jim Dole invented canned pineapple.
  4. The Hawaiian Pineapple Co. (now Dole Pineapple) held a pineapple recipe contest in 1925, with judges from Fannie Farmer’s School, Good Housekeeping and McCall’s magazine on the judging panel. The 100 winning recipes would be published in a cookbook the following year.
  5. The Hawaiin Pineapple Company ran an ad campaign in 1926 based on the fact that so many recipes for the cake had been submitted, naturally making the Pineapple Upside Down Cake even more popular.

Fun Fact:

Caribbean Indians placed pineapples or pineapple crowns outside the entrances of their homes to symbolize friendship and hospitality.

The Spanish explorers thought pineapples looked like pinecones, so they called them “Pina.” The English added “apple” to associate it with juicy delectable fruits.

Pineapple, “halakahiki” in Hawaiian, meaning foreign fruit, has been grown in Hawaii since the early 1800’s.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  1. 1770 Marie-Anne de Cupis de Camargo died. Born in Belgium, this ballerina danced with the Paris Opera. Escoffier named many gourmet dishes in her honor.
  2. 1841 Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘The Murders in the Rue Morgue’ was published, the first modern detective story. This has nothing to do with food, but I am an avid fan of both detective fiction and Poe.

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April 19 is National Rice Ball Day

Posted on April 19, 2015

imgarcade.com

imgarcade.com

Here are today’s five things to know about Rice Balls

  1. The rice balls preserve very well, and can even be used to preserve meats or other foods within its airtight seal.
  2. The rice ball is traditionally Japanese.
  3. Typically the rice is soaked in vinegar and made to stick together.  Dipping it in soy sauce will cause it to fall apart again.
  4. Rice balls date back at least as far as the 11th century.
  5. Another word for the rice ball is “Onigiri”, a word commonly misused to refer to sushi.

Fun Fact:

Popular onigiri fillings include tuna salad, salmon flakes, seafood salad, konbu (a type of sea vegatable), umeboshi (a sour bright-red pickled Japanese plum), tempura, and even natto (eat this one at your own risk!).

“Onigri” literally means “to hold on to”.

It was believed that onigiri could not be mass-produced as the hand-rolling technique was considered too difficult for a machine to replicate. In the 1980s, however, a machine that made triangular onigiri was devised. 

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1877 Ole Evinrude was born. He invented the first practical outboard motor in 1909. The idea came to him while rowing a boat to a picnic one day. He decided there must be an easier way to move a small boat on the water.
  • 1882 Charles Darwin Died. Pioneering English naturalist who developed the theory of evolution. His works include ‘Origin of Species’ and ‘The Descent of Man.’
  • 1904 Richard Pough was born. An American ecologist he was the founding president of the Nature Conservancy and helped found the World Wildlife Fund. In 1945, he was one of the first to warn about the dangers of DDT to fish and birds.
  • 1933 Jayne Mansfield was born. American beauty contest winner, stage and screen actress. Supposedly the only title she ever turned down was ‘Miss Roquefort Cheese,’ because she believed it “just didn’t sound right.”
  • 1947 Mark Volman of the music group ‘The Turtles’ was born.
  • 1968 ‘Honey’ by Bobby Goldsboro is #1 on the charts.
  • 1975 Percy L. Julian died. An African American chemist, he worked on synthesizing various compounds from soy beans. One of his creations was a foam fire extinguisher refined from soya protein.
  • 1995 The Supreme Court ruled that alcohol content could be listed on beer labels, overturning a 1935 law which had prohibited it.

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April 18 is National Animal Crackers Day

Posted on April 18, 2015

imgkid.com

imgkid.com

Here are today’s five things to know about Animal Crackers

  1. The famous Barnum’s animal crackers box was originally a Christmas ornament hung by a string.  The string can still be found on boxes.
  2. A box of Animal Crackers sold for 5 cents in 1902.
  3. Animal Crackers originated in England where they were known as animal biscuits.
  4. 54 different animals have been created as animal crackers. The most popular brand, Barnum’s Animal Crackers, has featured 37 different animals since 1902.
  5. The most recent addition to the Barnum’s animal crackers is the Koala bear.

Fun Fact:

Over the years, the only ones that have survived the entire lifetime of the product are bears, elephants, lions and tigers.

Shirley Temple sang “Animal crackers in my soup, Monkeys and rabbits loop the loop,”, but rabbits never found their way into a box of Barnum’s Animal Crackers.

The name referred to P. T. Barnum (1810-1891), the famous circus owner and showman.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1834 William Lamb became prime minister of England. (I know it’s a stretch, but his name is Lamb!).
  • 1904 ‘Pigmeat’ Markham was born. American actor, comedian. (“Here comes the Judge.”).
  • 1906 San Francisco was hit by a devastating earthquake at 5:12 a.m.
  • 1907 The Fairmont hotel reopened in San Francisco, one year after being severely damaged by the San Francisco Earthquake of 1906.
  • 1944 Skip Spence of the music group ‘Moby Grape’ was born.

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April 16 is National Eggs Benedict Day

Posted on April 16, 2015

modernflavormagazine.com

modernflavormagazine.com

Here are today’s five thing to know about Egg Benedict:

  1. Eggs Blackstone substitutes streaky bacon for the ham and adds a tomato slice.
  2. Huevos Benedict substitutes avocado for the ham, and is topped with both salsa and hollandaise sauce.
  3. Eggs Sardou substitutes artichoke bottoms and crossed anchovy fillets for the English muffin and ham, then tops the hollandaise sauce with chopped ham and a truffle slice. The dish was created at Antoine’s Restaurant in New Orleans in honor of the French playwright Victorien Sardou. A more widespread version of the dish starts with a base of creamed spinach, substitutes artichoke bottoms for the English muffin, and eliminates the ham.
  4. Portobello Benedict substitutes Portobello mushrooms for the ham, and is a popular alternative for Catholics observing the Friday Fast.
  5. Eggs Provençal replaces the Hollandaise sauce with Béarnaise Sauce.

Fun Fact:

Historians attribute the invention of Eggs Benedict to two different events.

Origin Story 1:  In the 1860’s, a regular patron of the restaurant, Mrs. LeGrand Benedict, finding nothing to her liking and wanting something new to eat for lunch, discussed this with Chef Charles Ranhofer(1936-1899), Ranhofer came up with Eggs Benedict.

Origin Story 2:  In 1894, Lemuel Benedict, a Wall Street broker, who was suffering from a hangover, ordered “some buttered toast, crisp bacon, two poached eggs, and a hooker of hollandaise sauce” at the Waldorf Hotel in New York. The Waldorf’s legendary chef, Oscar Tschirky, was so impressed that he put the dish on his breakfast and luncheon menus after substituting Canadian bacon for crisp bacon and a toasted English muffin for toasted bread.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1521 Martin Luther arrived at the Diet of Worms. This was NOT the first fad diet.
  • 1906 William James Farrer died. An Australian agriculturist, he developed new varieties of wheat.
  • 1924 Henry Mancini was born. Oscar winning music composer, he wrote many songs and film scores, including the score for ‘Breakfast at Tiffany’s’
  • 1928 Ellsworth Milson Statler died. American hotel owner, founder of Statler Hotels. His Statler Hotel in Buffalo, New York was the first hotel in the U.S. to have running water and private baths in each room.
  • 1941 The original Elsie the Cow died. Elsie the cow was originally a cartoon character appearing in ads for Borden Milk. At the 1939 New York World’s Fair, when people began asking where Elsie was, Borden’s picked a cow originally named ‘You’ll do Lobelia’ from their herd to be Elsie. Elsie stared in commercials, made personal appearances, and even starred in an RKO movie, ‘Little Men.’ Elsie was injured in a truck accident in 1941 and had to be put to sleep. She is buried in Plainsboro, New Jersey.
  • 1956 On the ‘I Love Lucy’ show, Lucy stomped grapes in Rome, and wrestled with another female grape stomper. An inspiration for future ‘food wrestling’ entrepreneurs. Actually, this is one of the funniest sitcom episodes ever made.

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April 15 is National Ham Day

Posted on April 15, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Glazed Ham:

  1. The Hormel Company of Austin, Minnesota sold the first canned ham in 1926.
  2. Hams are produced by almost every country in the world.
  3. Mainz ham is a German ham that is brined, soaked in brandy or wine lees (or a mixture of both) and then smoked for a long period.
  4. A country ham is much drier than injected-cured hams and has a sharper flavored due to its high salt content.
  5. A pig scratches himself with his right leg, which uses the muscles more often, so the meat will be tougher.  Aim for the left leg if you can.

Fun Fact:

On the Apollo 13 mission, the crew managed to create a functioning CO2 filter out of duct tape and glazed ham.

Chicago artist Dwight Kalb made a statue of Madonna from 180 pounds of ham.

Names of some of the better known hams of the world include: Smithfield, prosciutto, Westphalian, Parma, Virginia, Kentucky, Country, Canned, Bayonne, York, Mainz, Prague, Asturias, Toulouse, Dijon, Black Forest, Bohemian, Serrano, presunto, Bradenham, Estremadura, Prazska sunks, and szynka.

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Today’s Food History

  • 1710 Marie-Anne de Cupis de Camargo was born. Born in Belgium, this ballerina danced with the Paris Opera. Escoffier named many gourmet dishes in her honor.
  • 1854 New York became the first state to fund a study of insects harmful to plants.
  • 1874 George Harrison Shull was born. An American botanist, frequently called the ‘father of hybrid corn.’
  • 1878 Harley Proctor created Ivory Soap.
  • 1912 John Jacob Astor IV died. Great grandson of John Jacob Astor, who founded the family fortune. John Jacob IV built the Astoria section of what would become the Waldorf Astoria Hotel (1897) in New York city (this was on the site that were the Empire State building would be built in 1929). He also built the Knickerbocker and the St. Regis hotels. He died on the Titanic.
  • 1951 Household hints columnist, Heloise, was born in Waco, Texas.
  • 1955 The first franchised McDonald’s was opened in Des Plaines, Illinois, by Ray Kroc, who bought the hamburger restaurant owned by the McDonald brothers. On opening day a 2 patty hamburger was 15 cents and French Fries were 10 cents

 


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April 14 is National Pecan Day

Posted on April 14, 2015

luxebeatmag.com

luxebeatmag.com

Here are today’s five thing to know about Pecan:

  1. Pecans come in a variety of sizes – mammoth, extra large, large, medium, small and midget.
  2. Before a shelled pecan is ready to be sold, it must first be cleaned, sized, sterilized, cracked and finally, shelled.
  3. There are over 1,000 varieties of pecans.  Many are named for Native American Indian tribes, including Cheyenne, Mohawk, Sioux, Choctaw and Shawnee.
  4. Texas adopted the pecan tree as its state tree in 1919.
  5. 2 Pecans provide nearly 10 percent of the recommended Daily Value for zinc.

Fun Fact:

Albany, Georgia, which boasts more than 600,000 pecan trees, is the pecan capital of the U.S. Albany hosts the annual National Pecan Festival, which includes a race, parade, pecan-cooking contest, the crowning of the National Pecan Queen and many other activities.
The U.S. produces about 80 percent of the world’s pecan crop.
Native Americans utilized and cultivated wild pecans in the 1500s. It is the only tree native to North America and is considered one of the most valuable North American nut species.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1828 The first edition of Noah Webster’s dictionary is copyrighted.
  • 1912 The British luxury liner Titanic struck an iceberg shortly before midnight. It sank at 2:20 a.m. on April 15.
  • 1927 Clarence Birdseye of Massachusetts received a U.K. patent for frozen fish fingers.
  • 1939 ‘The Grapes of Wrath’ by John Steinbeck was published.
  • 1964 Rachel Louise Carson died. An American biologist and author of ‘Silent Spring,’ about environmental pollution, especially the dangers of DDT.
  • 1989 ‘She Drives Me Crazy’ by Fine Young Cannibals is #1 on the charts

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April 4 is National Cordon Bleu Day

Posted on April 4, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Cordon Bleu:

  1. The phrase “Cordon Bleu” means “Blue Ribbon” when referring to the dish.
  2. Another use of the phrase “Cordon Bleu” comes from a distinguished order of sixteenth-century French knights, who apparently wore blue sashes and were therefore popularly referred to as the “Cordon-bleus.”
  3. Cordon Bleu is a thinly pounded piece of meat (most often chicken, but also veal or pork) stuffed with ham and cheese, then breaded and fried.
  4. Chicken Cordon Bleu is a relatively recent American creation, first found mentioned in the written word in 1967.
  5. Common variations on this recipe include baking instead of frying, skipping the breading, and switching the order of the meats.

Fun Fact:

The dish did not originate at any of the prestigious Cordon Bleu cooking schools of Europe as often thought. It is not exactly clear who was the first person to prepare and name the dish chicken cordon bleu.

There are many regional dishes from Europe that share characteristics with Chicken Cordon Bleu. Some of the countries that include roulades, or roll ups of meat, in their cuisine are Germany, France and Italy.

In largely Muslim-populated countries, the halal versions of chicken cordon bleu are also popular, but to cater to the halal requirement for the Muslims, the chicken is rolled around a beef instead of a pork product.

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Today’s Food History

  • 1828 Casparus van Wooden of Amsterdam, patented chocolate milk powder.
  • 1871 Mary Florence Potts of Ottumwa, Iowa patented the ‘Mrs. Potts’ pressing iron. It had a detachable handle so several iron bodies could be heated and used in turn as one cooled down.
  • 1883 Peter Cooper died. American inventor and founder of the ‘Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art.’ He also obtained the first American patent for the manufacture of gelatin. In 1895, a cough syrup manufacturer, Pearl B. Wait purchased the patent and developed a packaged gelatin dessert. Wait’s wife, May David Wait named it Jell-O.
  • 1884 Adolphe Duglere died. A pupil of Careme, head chef of the Rothschild family, and head chef of the famous 19th century Paris restaurant, the Cafe Anglais.
  • 1887 William Cumming Rose was born. An American biochemist, he researched amino acids, and established the importance of the 8 essential amino acids in human nutrition.
  • 1893 Alphonse Pyrame de Candolle died. A Swiss botanist, author of ‘Origin of Cultivated Plants.’
  • 1899Benjamin F. Jackson patented a gas burner.
  • 1932 Vitamin C is first isolated by C.G. King at the University of Pittsburgh.
  • 1998 A locust plague in Ethiopia was reported that covered almost 4,000 acres

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April 1 is National Sourdough Bread Day

Posted on April 1, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Sourdough Bread:

  • The liquid alcohol layer referred to as ‘hooch’ comes from an Native American tribe called Hoochinoo. The Hoochinoo used to trade supplies with Alaskan gold miners for the ‘hooch’ off the top of their sourdough starters.
  • Barm is the English term for sourdough starter. It is derived from the term ‘barmy’ which means tipsy, or ditzy. This is because of the alcohol!
  • Sourdough likely originated in Ancient Egyptian times around 1500 BC and was likely the first form of leavening available to bakers.
  • Baker’s yeast is not useful as sourdough starter for leavening rye bread, as rye does not contain enough gluten.
  • Most bread is leavened with yeast, but sourdough is leavened with the Lactobacillus bacterium.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

1582 France adopted the new Gregorian calendar. Prior to that, the new year was celebrated on April 1. (The new year actually started on March 25, which fell during Holy Week – so the celebrations were delayed until the first day of April). One explanation of the origin of ‘April Fools Day’ is that those who failed to accept the new start of the year on January 1 became the object of practical jokes. (Pope Gregory XIII introduced the new Gregorian Calendar in 1582. It is possible that Charles IX of France may have changed the start of the New Year to January in 1564).

1755 Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin was born. A French politician and author of the 8 volume Physiologie du goût, ou Méditation de gastronomie transcendante, ouvrage théorique, historique et à l’ordre du jour (“The Physiology of Taste, or Meditation on Transcendent Gastronomy, a Work Theoretical, Historical, and Programmed”) published in 1825. It treats dining as an art form and contains many delightful and witty observations on the pleasures of the table.

1893 The first dishwashing machine became an award winning success at the 1893 Columbian Exposition, which used Josephine Garis Cochran’s hand operated, mechanical dishwashers in its kitchens. (She patented her original version on December 28, 1886.) Her company eventually evolved into KitchenAid.

1911 Seaman Asahel Knapp died. An American agriculturist, he began the system which evolved into the U.S. Cooperative Extension Service.

1932 Actor Gordon Jump was born. The ‘Maytag Repairman’ in commercials, also Arthur Carlson on ‘WKRP in Cincinnati’.

1960 Tiros I, the first weather observation satellite was launched from Cape Kennedy.

1976 Jimmy Buffet’s ‘Margaritaville’ was released.

1976 R.I.P. Carl Peter Henrik Dam. Dam was a Danish biochemist who discovered vitamin K in 1939.

1996 The Taco Bell fast food chain played an April Food joke on the American public by claiming to have bought the Liberty Bell to help pay down the national debt.

1999 The first minimum wage goes into effect in Britain, £3.60 an hour for adults and £3.00 an hour for those under 22 years old.

1999 In April 1999, Restaurant Nora in Washington DC became America’s first certified organic restaurant. This means that 95% or more of everything that you eat at the restaurant has been produced by certified organic growers and farmers.

March 31 is Oysters on the Half Shell Day

Posted on March 31, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Oyster:

  1. An oyster has a lifespan of over 100 years.
  2. The oyster has no head, no biting mouth parts and no arms or legs.
  3. An oysters two or three inches in diameter would probably be three to five years old.
  4. It takes about 25 to 28 months for oyster larvae to reach market size.
  5. Oysters feed year-round, though they feed less in winter because they need less energy.

Fun Fact:

All shelled fish should be alive when you eat them raw.  If they’re dead (closed), toss them back.

There are over 5,000 different species of oyster world wide.

 The flavor and color of oysters is influenced by the sand or sediment and the waters that they live in.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1814 John Lineback patented the cottonseed hulling machine.
  • 1848 William Waldorf Astor was born. William Waldorf Astor was a cousin of John Jacob Astor IV, the great grandson of John Jacob Astor. He built the Waldorf section (1893) of what would become the Waldorf Astoria (1897). The Empire State Building (1929) now stands on the site of the former hotel.
  • 1918 Daylight Savings Time went into effect in the U.S. for the first time.
  • 1989 Chefs from Japanese restaurants in New York have finally persuaded the FDA to allow them to import and serve fogu. The first shipment of Japanese blowfish (tora fugu) arrived today. The chefs had to attend special classes to protect their customers from poisoning.
  • 1946 G. Allan Nichol of the music group ‘The Turtles’ was born.
  • 2005 Frank Perdue president of Perdue Farms died today. He was the son of the company’s founder Arthur Perdue. Perdue is the 3rd largest poultry company in the U.S. 

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March 28 is National Black Forest Cake Day

Posted on March 28, 2015

mybestrecipes.eu

mybestrecipes.eu

Here are today’s five thing to know about Black Forest Cake:

  1. Typically, Black Forest cake consists of several layers of chocolate cake, with whipped cream and cherries between each layer.
  2. In some European traditions sour cherries are used both between the layers and for decorating the top.
  3. Traditionally, Kirschwasser (a clear liquor distilled from tart cherries) is added to the cake, although other liquors are also used
  4. The cake is named not directly after the Black Forest (Schwarzwald) mountain range in southwestern Germany but rather from the specialty liquor of that region, known as Schwarzwälder Kirsch(wasser) and distilled from tart cherries.
  5. Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte was first mentioned in writing in 1934.

Fun Fact:

The record for the world’s largest authentic black forest cake, weighing 3000 kg, was set at Europa Park, Germany on 16 July 2006, by K&D Bakery.

In the history of black forest cake, it was not in the form of a cake but instead as a dessert recipe.

The forests in “Hansel and Gretel”, “Snow White”, and “Rapunzel” are based on the Black Forest. They are all German fairy tales.

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

  • 1797 The first U.S. patent for a ‘washing machine’ was issued (possibly to Nathaniel Briggs).  It was called a scrub board or wash board.
  • 1819 Sir Joseph William Bazalgette was born.  A British civil engineer, he designed the main sewer system for London.
  • 1897 Victor Mills was born.  He was a chemical engineer who worked for Proctor & Gamble.  He improved Duncan Hines cake mixes, improved Jif peanut butter, and invented Pampers disposable diapers.
  • 1968 ‘Whiskey On A Sunday’ was recorded by the Irish Rovers.
  • 1996 John Leonard submitted an order form along with ‘Pepsi Points’ and a check to Pepsi for a Harrier Jump Jet.  The Harrier had been featured in a Pepsi commercial as one of the items that could be redeemed for ‘points,’ or a combination of cash and points. Pepsi subsequently refused to send Leonard the Harrier Jump Jet (actual cost: $23 million).  Leonard then sued, and finally a judge ruled that the Harrier Jump Jet had obviously been mentioned in the promotion as a joke.

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March 24 is National Cake Pop Day

Posted on March 24, 2015

Here are today’s five thing to know about Cake Pop:

  1. A cake pop is cake, baked in an appealing shape, hand dipped in frosting,  and decorated to taste, all on a stick to be eaten as candy.
  2. While there is no recorded date for the creation of cake pops. Most people say that Bakerella, a popular baking blog, helped make then a “pop” phenomenon.See Pinterest below
  3. In 2011, cake pops were considered the newest and most popular confectionery food trends
  4. Other variations of cake pops are  cake balls, cakesicles, cupcake pops, and cake-on-a-stick.
  5. Cake pops in recent years have become ubiquitous to Starbucks coffee shops.

* Bakerella celebrates National Cake Pop Day on Feb 1

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Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

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Today’s Food History

      • 1765 The British Parliament passed the Quartering Act, which required American colonists to provide temporary quarters, food, drink, etc. to British troops stationed in their towns.
      • 1896 Clement Hardy received a patent for the rotary disk plow.
      • 1989 The worst oil spill in U.S. history (up to that point) occurred as the Exxon Valdez ran aground in Alaska’s Prince William Sound, and eventually leaked 11 million gallons of crude oil.  The effects on wildlife and fish was devastating.
      • 1990 R.I.P. Cookbook author Jane Grigson, age 61.

May 7 is National Leg of Lamb Day

Posted on May 7, 2014

lamb-leg-1210-xlg-50509617

For decades May 7 has been a day to celebrate leg of lamb,

the most popular cut of lamb in North America

Did you know…

  1. The oldest organized industry is raising sheep.
  2. The average American eats less than a pound of lamb a year
  3. All American Lamb is hormone free and American Lamb can be offered as all-natural products that are antibiotic free.
  4. This meat generally is more tender than that from older sheep and appears more often on tables in some Western countries.
  5. Lamb should be stored in the refrigerator or freezer immediately after purchasing. Refrigerate fresh lamb at 40 degrees or below.

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Today’s Food History

  • 1660 Isaack B. Fubine of The Hague received a patent for macaroni.
  • (This fact is reported on many sites on the internet. No one has any further information listed, and I am in doubt as to its accuracy).
  • 1873 Salmon Portland Chase died. He was Secretary of the Treasury under Abraham Lincoln, and later Chief Justice.
  • 1947 The ‘Kraft Television Theater’ premiered on NBC TV
  • 1953 The world record swordfish was caught in Chile: 1,182 pounds.
  • 1987 Shelly Long, who played Diane Chambers, makes her final appearance as a regular on ‘Cheers.’

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May 6 is National Crepe Suzette Day

Posted on May 6, 2014

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Interesting Food Facts about Crepe Suzette

  1. The most common way to make Crêpe Suzette is to pour liqueur (usually Grand Marnier) over a freshly-cooked crêpe with sugar and light it.
  2. This will make the alcohol in the liqueur evaporate, resulting in a fairly thick, caramelised sauce. In a restaurant, a Crêpe Suzette is often prepared in a chafing dish in full view of the guests.
  3. The origin of the dish and its name is somewhat disputed. One claim is that the dish was created out of a mistake made by a fourteen year-old assistant waiter Henri Charpentier in 1895 at the Maitre at Monte Carlo’s Café de Paris. He was preparing a dessert for the Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII of the United Kingdom, whose guests included a beautiful French girl named Suzette.
  4. Different sources (like the Larousse Gastronomique) however doubt that Charpentier was serving the prince instead of the head waiter because he would have been too young.
  5. The other claim states Crêpes Suzette was named in honor of French actress Suzanne Reichenberg (1853–1924), who worked professionally under the name Suzette.

Fun Fact:

In the early days of the crepe, white flour was an expensive product, reserved only for royalty that why savory crepes were traditionaly made with buckweat , a esay to grow plant..

 Crepe is the French word for pancake.  Crepes differ from traditional pancakes in that they are lighter, thinner and are utilized in both sweet and savory dishes. 

Unlike pancake batter where some lumps are of no consequence, crepe batter must be smooth and more fluid, like the consistency of heavy cream.

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Today’s Food History

  • 1806 Chapin Aaron Harris was born. He was cofounder of the first dental school in the world, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery.
  • 1833 John Deere developed the first steel plow.
  • 1851 John Gorrie patented an ice making machine, the first U.S. patent for a mechanical refrigerator.
  • 1862 RIP Henry David Thoreau, American author, philosopher, and naturalist. Author of ‘Walden; or, Life in the Woods.’
  • 1898 Daniel Gerber of baby food fame was born.
  • 1905 Toots Shor, restaurateur was born.
  • 1940 John Steinbeck receives the Pulitzer Prize for his novel ‘The Grapes of Wrath.’
  • 1959 Icelandic gunboats fired on British trawlers during their ‘Cod War’ over fishing rights

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May 5 is National Enchilada Day

Posted on May 5, 2014

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Interesting Food Facts about Enchilada

  1. The enchilada is one of the dishes mentioned in Mexico’s first cookbook in 1831.
  2. Enchilada is the past participle of Spanish enchilar, “to add chile pepper to”, literally to “season (or decorate) with chile.”
  3. Enchiladas originated in Mexico, where the practice of rolling tortillas around other food dates back at least to Mayan times.
  4. Writing at the time of the Spanish conquistadors, Bernal Díaz del Castillo documented a feast enjoyed by Europeans hosted by Hernán Cortés in Coyoacán, which included foods served in corn tortillas.
  5. In the 19th century, as Mexican cuisine was being memorialized, enchiladas were mentioned in the first Mexican cookbook, El cocinero mexicano (“The Mexican Chef”), published in 1831, and in Mariano Galvan Rivera’s Diccionario de Cocina, published in 1845.

Fun Fact:

Enchiladas appeared in an English language cookbook in 1914 titled, California Mexican-Spanish Cookbook written by Bertha Haffner Ginger.

In Costa Rica, the enchilada is a common, small, spicy pastry made with puff pastry and filled with diced potatoes spiced with a common variation of tabasco sauce or other similar sauces.

In Honduras, enchiladas is called tostada. They are not corn tortillas rolled around a filling, but instead are flat, fried, corn tortillas topped with ground beef, salad toppings, a tomato sauce, and crumbled or shredded cheese.  

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Today’s Food History

  • 1865 Nellie Bly (Elizabeth Jane Cochran) was born. In 1889 Bly successfully completed an attempt to beat the record of Jules Verne’s fictional Phileas Fogg to go ‘Around the World in Eighty Days’. Bly was a U.S. newspaper reporter and completed the journey in 72 days, 6 hours, 11 minutes and 14 seconds.
  • 1903 James Beard, culinary expert and cookbook author was born. Quote: “The kitchen, reasonably enough, was the scene of my first gastronomic adventure. I was on all fours. I crawled into the vegetable bin, settled on a giant onion and ate it, skin and all. It must have marked me for life, for I have never ceased to love the hearty flavor of raw onions”.
  • 1926 Ann B. Davis was born. She played the role of Alice the housekeeper and cook on the TV show ‘The Brady Bunch’ (1969-1974).
  • 1936 A patent was granted for the first bottle with a screw cap to Edward Ravenscroft of Glencoe, Illinois.

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May 4 is National Hoagie Day

Posted on May 4, 2014

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Interesting Food Facts about Hoagie

  1. The original “hoagie” is what is now referred to as an “Italian Hoagie” which includes a variety of traditional Italian lunch meats, including dry salami, mortadella, capicolla, and provolone served with lettuce, tomato and onions with a light vinegar and oil dressing.
  2. Former Philadelphia mayor (also once Pennsylvania governor) Ed Rendell declared the hoagie the “Official Sandwich of Philadelphia”.
  3. Most hoagie shops offer single-meat hoagies (for example, ham or salami hoagies) as well as premium hoagies with upscale ingredients: prosciutto, imported Italian lunchmeats (cotechino, mortadella, sopressata, etc.). A popular variant is the grinder or cosmo, which is essentially a hoagie that has been toasted under a broiler.
  4. Many takeout shops in Chicago sell a “hoagy” (sic.), usually containing steak and other ingredients, with the option of being “heated.” They also sell cheesesteak, referred to most often as “Philly Steak.”
  5. In many areas the default cheese on a hoagie is Provolone, while in others it is white American cheese. Cheese-only hoagies (Provolone, American, or Mixed) replace the meat with extra slices of cheese.

Fun Fact:

Hoagie was declared the “Official Sandwich of Philadelphia” in 1992. 

The most widely accepted story of hoagie’s origin centers on an area of Philadelphia known as Hog Island, which was home to a shipyard during World War I (1914-1918). 

During the late 1930s, DePalma joined forces with Buccelli’s Bakery and developed the perfect hoagie roll (an eight-inch roll that became the standard for the modern-day hoagie).

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Today’s Food History

  • 1494 Columbus landed at Jamaica and met the Arawak Indians. The Arawak used Jamaican pimento (allspice) to season and smoke meat (usually pigs), the foundation upon which Jamaican Jerk developed.
  • 1854 Asa Fitch was appointed as New York state entomologist, the first such in the U.S. He studied insects and their effects on agricultural crops.
  • 1942 War time food rationing began in the U.S.

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