Posts tagged “wordpress

April 1 is Soylent Green Day: “For the people, by the people.”

Posted on March 31, 2018

 

 _DSC6977

Interesting Food Facts about Soylent Green

  1. Soylent Green, introduced 1966, is usually considered the original “green” food.
  2. It was first marketed as a, “Miracle food of high-energy plankton gathered from the oceans of the world.”
  3. Throughout the years the company has adopted many slogans:
    • “Food for the people, by the people.”
    • “Make room, make room for green.”
    • “It’s easy being green.”
    • “You’re in good hands with Soylent.”
  4. You can find many recipes for homemade Soylent Green, but there’s nothing like the real thing.
  5. It is said that Charlton Heston was this snack’s #1 fan, keeping mass quantities in his home.

Fun Fact:

The Soylent Green Biscuit Co. is planning on world distribution by 2022.

The Soylent Green Biscuit Co’s famous snack has been a cult classic since its inception in 1973.  People everywhere were delighted to have this affordable snack that “tastes just like grandmas.”

Charlton Heston says that, “When April 1st heralds the coming of Spring, I always think fondly of Soylent Green.”

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1582 France adopted the new Gregorian calendar.  Prior to that, the new year was celebrated on April 1.
  • 1755 Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin was born.  In his books, dining is treated as an art form and contains many delightful and witty observations on the pleasures of the table.
  • 1893 The first dishwashing machine became an award winning success at the 1893 Columbian Exposition, which used Josephine Garis Cochran’s hand operated, mechanical dishwashers in its kitchens.  (She patented her original version on December 28, 1886.)  Her company eventually evolved into KitchenAid.
  • 1911 Seaman Asahel Knapp died.  An American agriculturist, he began the system which evolved into the U.S. Cooperative Extension Service.
  • 1932 Actor Gordon Jump was born.  The ‘Maytag Repairman’ in commercials, also Arthur Carlson on ‘WKRP in Cincinnati’
  • 1960 Tiros I, the first weather observation satellite was launched from Cape Kennedy.
  • 1976 Jimmy Buffet’s ‘Margaritaville’ was released.
  • 1976 Carl Peter Henrik Dam died. Dam was a Danish biochemist who discovered vitamin K in 1939.
  • 1994 Ray Geiger died (born Sept 18, 1910).  Editor of theFarmers’ Almanac from 1934-1993, and editor of American Farm & Home Almanac from 1964-1990.
  • 1996 The Taco Bell fast food chain played an April Food joke on the American public by claiming to have bought the Liberty Bell to help pay down the national debt
  • 1999 The first minimum wage goes into effect in Britain, £3.60 an hour for adults and £3.00 an hour for those under 22 years old.
  • 1999 In April 1999, Restaurant Nora in Washington DC became America’s first certified organic restaurant.  This means that 95% or more of everything that you eat at the restaurant has been produced by certified organic growers and farmers.

dvdr1 2

April 23 is National Picnic Day

Posted on April 23, 2016

 

image

Here are today’s five things to know about Picnic

  1. Did you know that a “picnic” ham is really not a true ham? It is cut from the upper part of the foreleg of a pig – a true ham is cut from the hind leg.
  2. Italy’s favourite picnic day is Easter Monday. It is called “Angel’s Monday” or Pasquetta (“Little Easter”).
  3. After an ant has visited your picinc, it lays down a scent as it returns to the nest for the other ants to follow!
  4. In the year 2000, a 600-mile-long picnic took place in France to celebrate the first Bastille Day of the new millennium.
  5. The first table designed specifically for picnics (in a style similar to what we know today) appeared in the late 1800s.

Fun Fact:

In the first half of the 19th century, a Picnic Society met in London at the Pantheon, a place of public entertainment in Oxford Street.

The French started the modern fashion for picnics when they opened their royal parks to the public after the revolution of 1789.

The 1955 film Picnic, with William Holden and Kim Novak, was nominated for six Oscars and won two for best art direction and best film editing.

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1564 and 1616 William Shakespeare was born. He passed away on the same date 52 years later. There are many references to food in Shakespeare’s works. “Let the sky rain potatoes.” (‘The Merry Wives of Windsor’). “Tis an ill cook that cannot lick his own fingers.” (‘Romeo and Juliet’).
  • 1895 Purdy and Peters were issued a patent for a “design for spoons.”
  • 1947 Glenn Cornick of the music group ‘Jethro Tull’ was born.
  • 1982 The Conch Republic (Key West & the Florida Keys) seceded from the United States to protest an INS (Immigration & Naturalization Service) roadblock on the only road into the Keys.
  • 1985 Coca-Cola announced it was changing its 99 year old secret formula. New Coke was a big flop.
  • 1992 The first McDonald’s in Beijing, China opened. It is the world’s largest McDonald’s, with 28,000 square feet, seating for 700 and 1,000 employees.
  • 1993 R.I.P. Cesar Chavez. He was the founder of the United Farm Workers Union.

dvdr1 2

May 7 is National Leg of Lamb Day

Posted on May 7, 2015

lamb-leg-1210-xlg-50509617

For decades May 7 has been a day to celebrate leg of lamb,

the most popular cut of lamb in North America

 Today’s five things to know about Lamb

  1. The oldest organized industry is raising sheep.
  2. The average American eats less than a pound of lamb a year
  3. All American Lamb is hormone free and American Lamb can be offered as all-natural products that are antibiotic free.
  4. This meat generally is more tender than that from older sheep and appears more often on tables in some Western countries.
  5. Lamb should be stored in the refrigerator or freezer immediately after purchasing. Refrigerate fresh lamb at 40 degrees or below.

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1660 Isaack B. Fubine of The Hague received a patent for macaroni.
  • (This fact is reported on many sites on the internet. No one has any further information listed, and I am in doubt as to its accuracy).
  • 1873 Salmon Portland Chase died. He was Secretary of the Treasury under Abraham Lincoln, and later Chief Justice.
  • 1947 The ‘Kraft Television Theater’ premiered on NBC TV
  • 1953 The world record swordfish was caught in Chile: 1,182 pounds.
  • 1987 Shelly Long, who played Diane Chambers, makes her final appearance as a regular on ‘Cheers.’

dvdr1 2

May 6 is National Crepe Suzette Day

Posted on May 6, 2015

DSC05301-1024x680

Today’s five things to know about Crepe Suzette

  1. The most common way to make Crêpe Suzette is to pour liqueur (usually Grand Marnier) over a freshly-cooked crêpe with sugar and light it.
  2. This will make the alcohol in the liqueur evaporate, resulting in a fairly thick, caramelised sauce. In a restaurant, a Crêpe Suzette is often prepared in a chafing dish in full view of the guests.
  3. The origin of the dish and its name is somewhat disputed. One claim is that the dish was created out of a mistake made by a fourteen year-old assistant waiter Henri Charpentier in 1895 at the Maitre at Monte Carlo’s Café de Paris. He was preparing a dessert for the Prince of Wales, the future King Edward VII of the United Kingdom, whose guests included a beautiful French girl named Suzette.
  4. Different sources (like the Larousse Gastronomique) however doubt that Charpentier was serving the prince instead of the head waiter because he would have been too young.
  5. The other claim states Crêpes Suzette was named in honor of French actress Suzanne Reichenberg (1853–1924), who worked professionally under the name Suzette.

Fun Fact:

In the early days of the crepe, white flour was an expensive product, reserved only for royalty that why savory crepes were traditionaly made with buckweat , a esay to grow plant..

 Crepe is the French word for pancake.  Crepes differ from traditional pancakes in that they are lighter, thinner and are utilized in both sweet and savory dishes. 

Unlike pancake batter where some lumps are of no consequence, crepe batter must be smooth and more fluid, like the consistency of heavy cream.

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1806 Chapin Aaron Harris was born. He was cofounder of the first dental school in the world, the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery.
  • 1833 John Deere developed the first steel plow.
  • 1851 John Gorrie patented an ice making machine, the first U.S. patent for a mechanical refrigerator.
  • 1862 RIP Henry David Thoreau, American author, philosopher, and naturalist. Author of ‘Walden; or, Life in the Woods.’
  • 1898 Daniel Gerber of baby food fame was born.
  • 1905 Toots Shor, restaurateur was born.
  • 1940 John Steinbeck receives the Pulitzer Prize for his novel ‘The Grapes of Wrath.’
  • 1959 Icelandic gunboats fired on British trawlers during their ‘Cod War’ over fishing rights

dvdr1 2

May 5 is National Enchilada Day

Posted on May 5, 2015

breakfast-enchiladas-4

Today’s five things to know about Enchilada

  1. The enchilada is one of the dishes mentioned in Mexico’s first cookbook in 1831.
  2. Enchilada is the past participle of Spanish enchilar, “to add chile pepper to”, literally to “season (or decorate) with chile.”
  3. Enchiladas originated in Mexico, where the practice of rolling tortillas around other food dates back at least to Mayan times.
  4. Writing at the time of the Spanish conquistadors, Bernal Díaz del Castillo documented a feast enjoyed by Europeans hosted by Hernán Cortés in Coyoacán, which included foods served in corn tortillas.
  5. In the 19th century, as Mexican cuisine was being memorialized, enchiladas were mentioned in the first Mexican cookbook, El cocinero mexicano (“The Mexican Chef”), published in 1831, and in Mariano Galvan Rivera’s Diccionario de Cocina, published in 1845.

Fun Fact:

Enchiladas appeared in an English language cookbook in 1914 titled, California Mexican-Spanish Cookbook written by Bertha Haffner Ginger.

In Costa Rica, the enchilada is a common, small, spicy pastry made with puff pastry and filled with diced potatoes spiced with a common variation of tabasco sauce or other similar sauces.

In Honduras, enchiladas is called tostada. They are not corn tortillas rolled around a filling, but instead are flat, fried, corn tortillas topped with ground beef, salad toppings, a tomato sauce, and crumbled or shredded cheese.  

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1865 Nellie Bly (Elizabeth Jane Cochran) was born. In 1889 Bly successfully completed an attempt to beat the record of Jules Verne’s fictional Phileas Fogg to go ‘Around the World in Eighty Days’. Bly was a U.S. newspaper reporter and completed the journey in 72 days, 6 hours, 11 minutes and 14 seconds.
  • 1903 James Beard, culinary expert and cookbook author was born. Quote: “The kitchen, reasonably enough, was the scene of my first gastronomic adventure. I was on all fours. I crawled into the vegetable bin, settled on a giant onion and ate it, skin and all. It must have marked me for life, for I have never ceased to love the hearty flavor of raw onions”.
  • 1926 Ann B. Davis was born. She played the role of Alice the housekeeper and cook on the TV show ‘The Brady Bunch’ (1969-1974).
  • 1936 A patent was granted for the first bottle with a screw cap to Edward Ravenscroft of Glencoe, Illinois.

dvdr1 2

May 4 is National Hoagie Day

Posted on May 4, 2015

commons.wikimedia.org

commons.wikimedia.org

Today’s five things to know about Hoagie

  1. The original “hoagie” is what is now referred to as an “Italian Hoagie” which includes a variety of traditional Italian lunch meats, including dry salami, mortadella, capicolla, and provolone served with lettuce, tomato and onions with a light vinegar and oil dressing.
  2. Former Philadelphia mayor (also once Pennsylvania governor) Ed Rendell declared the hoagie the “Official Sandwich of Philadelphia”.
  3. Most hoagie shops offer single-meat hoagies (for example, ham or salami hoagies) as well as premium hoagies with upscale ingredients: prosciutto, imported Italian lunchmeats (cotechino, mortadella, sopressata, etc.). A popular variant is the grinder or cosmo, which is essentially a hoagie that has been toasted under a broiler.
  4. Many takeout shops in Chicago sell a “hoagy” (sic.), usually containing steak and other ingredients, with the option of being “heated.” They also sell cheesesteak, referred to most often as “Philly Steak.”
  5. In many areas the default cheese on a hoagie is Provolone, while in others it is white American cheese. Cheese-only hoagies (Provolone, American, or Mixed) replace the meat with extra slices of cheese.

Fun Fact:

Hoagie was declared the “Official Sandwich of Philadelphia” in 1992. 

The most widely accepted story of hoagie’s origin centers on an area of Philadelphia known as Hog Island, which was home to a shipyard during World War I (1914-1918). 

During the late 1930s, DePalma joined forces with Buccelli’s Bakery and developed the perfect hoagie roll (an eight-inch roll that became the standard for the modern-day hoagie).

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1494 Columbus landed at Jamaica and met the Arawak Indians. The Arawak used Jamaican pimento (allspice) to season and smoke meat (usually pigs), the foundation upon which Jamaican Jerk developed.
  • 1854 Asa Fitch was appointed as New York state entomologist, the first such in the U.S. He studied insects and their effects on agricultural crops.
  • 1942 War time food rationing began in the U.S.

dvdr1 2

April 30 is National Raisin Day

Posted on April 30, 2015

Here are today’s five things to know about Raisin

  1. In 1873, a freak hot spell withered the grapes on the vine. One enterprising San Francisco grocer advertised these shriveled grapes as “Peruvian Delicacies” and the rest is history. 
  2. It takes more than 4 tons of grapes to produce 1 ton of raisins.
  3. The finest raisins come from Malaga in Spain.
  4. Raisin – comes from the Latin racemus and means “a cluster of grapes or berries”.
  5. Fresno, California is the Raisin Capital of the World.

Fun Fact:

Raisin colors vary by drying process. For example, a dark purplish/black raisin is sun-dried. A light to medium brown raisin is mechanically dehydrated in special drying tunnels. A golden to bright yellow raisin is mechanically dried and treated with sulfur dioxide to retain color and a green raisin is dried by air in adobe houses.

Golden raisins are made by treating the raisins with a lye solution, sometimes with lye and then burning sulfur, and sometimes with sulfur dioxide.

Unknown-1

Today’s Pinterest Board : Foodimentary

dvdr1

Today’s Food History

  • 1792 John Montague, 4th Earl of Sandwich died. Captain Cook named the Sandwich Islands after him (now known as Hawaii). He is supposed to have invented the sandwich as a quick meal so as not to interrupt his gambling sessions.
  • 1904 The Louisiana Purchase Exposition opened in St. Louis (St. Louis World’s Fair). It was at the Fair that the ice cream cone was supposed to have been invented. The hot dog and iced tea were also popularized at the Fair.
  • 1952 Mr. Potato Head is introduced to the world. Mr. Potato Head is the also the first toy to be advertised on television.
  • 1955 ‘Cherry Pink & Apple Blossom White’ by Perez Prado hits number one on the charts.
  • 1981 Dunkin Donuts opened its first store in the Philippines.

dvdr1 2

%d bloggers like this: